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Full text of "Hardware merchandising July-September 1918"



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Vol. XXX PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY SINCE 1888 July 6 

^^' 2^ THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED ^^^^ 

PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 



iF'V "'1 ^\ l--''x ^^^^ 



Ten Times the 
for the 




Illumination 

N Same I Money 




MOVABLE SHADE 
REFLECTS LIGHT \ 
ANY ANGLE \ 

Takes up little space — port- 
able anywhere — gives ten times 
the illuminating power that the 
same amount of current used in 
other kinds of lamps can give, 
thereby cutting down lighting 
bills. 

That's why the Wallace makes a 
real hit wherever demonstrated. 

Hundreds of uses in every home 
and office. Display it strongly in 
your store and watch results. 

MENZIES & COMPANY, Ltd. 

TORONTO, CANADA 

A. C. PENN - Incorporated NEW YORK 




|\\/allace 



I) ADJUSTABLE 



lamp 

"Approved by the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters ' 




FOLDED WHEN 

N0TINU5E 

FOR TRAVELLING. 



In Brass 
Nickel 



or oronze 



SPRING CONCEALED m BffSE WILL FASTEN 
TO BACK OF CHAIR OR BED. 



II A R D ^\' A RE AND METAL 




Canadian Rolling Mills 
Co., Limited 

Works: Lachine Canal, Montreal 



Manufacturers of 

BAR IRON AND STEEL 
squares and flats). 



(rounds, 



TWISTED STEEL BARS FOR REIN- 
FORCING. 

CANADIAN TUBE & IRON 
CO., LIMITED 

MONTREAL 



Canadian Tube & Iron 
Co., Limited 

Works: Lachine Canal, Montreal 
Manufacturers of 

BOLTS AND NUTS 
Carriage Bolts, Coach and Lag Screws, 
Tire Bolts, Machine Bolts, Sleigh Shoe 
Bolts, Plow Bolts, Track Bolts, Square 
Nuts, Hexagon Nuts, Boiler Rivets, 
Tinners' Rivets, etc. 

WROUGHT PIPE 

Black and Galvanized, sizes l^ in. to 4 
in., is thoroughly inspected and tested 
to 600 lbs. pressure, and every length 
is branded with our trade-mark. 
We also manufacture NIPPLES in all 
sizes — black or galvanized. 



Colonial Wire Mfg. 
Co., Limited 

Manufacturers of 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRES (Bright an- 
nealed, solid and annealed). 

TINNED MATTRESS WIRE, BROOM 
WIRE, FINE WIRE (plain and gal- 
vanized). 

FENCE STAPLES — WIRE NAILS — - 
WOOD SCREWS. 

PUMP RODS (plain and galvanized). 

CANADIAN TUBE & IRON 
CO., LIMITED 

MONTREAL 




July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





m 



SMALL 






.s. 



^oop 



Taps, Dies, Reamers, 
Milling Cutters, Drills 

Higrhest Grade Materials — Expert Workmen — 
Quality absolutely guaranteed. 

PRATT & WHITNEY CO., 
OF CANADA, LTD. 

Dundas Ontario Canada 

Montreal, 723 Druramond Bldg. ; Vancouver, 
609 Bank of Ottawa Bide.; Winnipeg, 1205 
McArthur Bldfr. 



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imim 111 imn ■■■■■■ II ■■iiPMagj 




Priest's Horse Clippers 

The line of Priests Clippers is so complete 
and varied that you simply can't help but 
find something that will suit both as to 
style and price. 



A. MacFarlane ®r Co. 
Montreal, Canada 



Selling Agents 



Wiebusch ca Hilger, Ltd. 
New York City 



// interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 




No. 9637— Percolator. 




No. 946— Toaster. 




No. 7538 — Casserole. 
Has Vitrified China Inserts. 




No. 476 — Percolator. 





No. 940— Chafer. 



No. 9081— Iron. 




This is the trade-mark 



UNIVERSAL 



It stands for the best in mechanical construc- 
tion, material, quality and satisfaction. 

You will find it in nearly every home on ap- 
pliances that are giving real satisfaction. 

It is easy to sell the ow^ners of these appli- 
ances other home needs under this trade- 
mark. 

The ow^ners of these appliances w\\\ buy 
more Home Needs and insist upon the 
UNIVERSAL trade-mark. 

Well-balanced, consistent national advertis- 
ing is persistently reminding housew^ives of 
the many UNIVERSAL Appliances, 

LANDERS, FRARY & CLARK 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 





No. 80— Vacuum Bottle. 




No. 02641— Pocket Knife. 




No. 02111— Carver. 




No. 1 — Food Chopper. 



No. 125 — Churn. 



No. 4 — Bread Maker. 



// interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to he answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BOOT 
CALKS 

for 
HUNTERS 



Our stocks of these lines are very large. We carry 
all staple lines, and we have been told that our prices 
are lower than houses that sell these lines exclusively. 

More shoe repairs will be sold than ever. See that 
your stock is well assorted. 



BOOT 
CALKS 

for 
WOODSMEN 







^MMS 



^SfS» 



/"w U D tS t-t ffe ; R E P Al RING 



COBBLERS' SHOE 
REPAIR OUTFITS 






iBSBimiiiaia"""'" 



BOOT 
CALKS 

for 
ICE-CUTTERS 



Cobbler repair outfits — Half Soles, Heel Taps, Rubber Heels, Shoe Lasts, 
Shoe Hammers, Shoe Pincers, Shoe Thread, Shoe Bristles, Shoe Wax, 
Peg Breaks, Heel Supports, Shoe Tacks. 

Look over your stock. If not supplied with all these items, write us. 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 

LEWIS BROS., LIMITED 



MONTREAL 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 



BOOT 
CALKS 

for 
LUMBERMEN 



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^ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



pAZORS 



A Square Foot of Selling Space 

[That Can Be Made Very Profitable 
In Your Store 

THE space occupied by this Genco Razor Display Case is about one square foot. 
Besides containing and protecting the razors, it catches and holds the eye 
and gives the goods a pleasing display. As a salesman it is on the job 
every minute. 

The case is made of pressed steel, with handsome Circassian walnut finish. It 
holds six Genco Razors of different design on constant display against a back- 
ground of Royal Purple plush and there is ample room beneath for carrying stock. 

All current Genco Razor advertising features this case prominently. It goes to 
work for you the minute it appears on your counter. Let it be a reminder to you/ 
customers of the 500 master cutlers who, in the largest high grade razor factory 
in the world, grind the quality in and the guess work out of Genco Razors. 

We are making a special proposition which included one of those display cases 
free with your first order. Write for the details of this offer now, while the 
matter is fresh in your mind. It's quite a good thing. Mention the name of your 
jobber when writing us. 

GENEVA CUTLERY COMPANY 

159 Gates Avenue, Geneva, New York 



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NO MORE. GVe&S V«OR%S. \N <%A>.XOR \a\l>f\H<a. 



'•'^f^KfeS'"" 



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<jenco 



RAZORS 



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If interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE 



AND 



METAL 




Utility — Strength — Safety 

^'Big 4'' Flexible Door Hangers 

are everywhere meeting fully the require- 
ments of builders and barn. 

Common-sense construction- — materials se- 
lected to withstand rough usage — - and 
reasonable price, are the essential features 
that go to make National "Big 4" a 100 per 
cent. Barn Door Hanger. 

The "Big 4" is simply but heavily built en- 
tirely of steel; has no complicated parts to get 
out of order; runs smoothly on anti-friction 
steel roller bearings; is flexible; is fastened to 
but one side of the door; brings the door close 
to the track; has sherardized axles and rivets; 
wheel housing is prevented from binding on 
hub of wheel; japanning is done before assem- 
bling, ensuring bearings free from japan; 
cannot jump the track. 

And these are Points that have made "Big 4" 
the great seller it is. 

Packed the careful "National Way" — one 
pair in a box, with bolts for attaching. A 
printed tag is also packed in each box, giving 
a list of articles required to properly equip 
each door. This serves as a reminder to the 
clerk and will help make sales of articles 
listed. 

Send for a National Catalog. 



NATIONAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

STERLING, ILLINOIS 




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HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 




Every body Likes 

Strap and Tee 

Hinges 

Packed One Pair in a Box with Screws 




No. S.c. 609 



No. S.c. 209 



Before placing your next order for hinges consider the time wasted loosening 

bundles, selecting and counting out the screws and wrapping in paper. 

Consider the additional customers you can wait on when hinges are already 

packaged, neatly labelled, ready to hand out. 

Consider the advantages of having a clean, attractive stock that can be handled 

without soiling the hands. 

Naturally this time- and labor-saving method appeals to the trade and consumer 

as is shown from the ever-increasing demand. 

In ordering, prefix the letters S.c. to the class number to distinguish from the 

line of hinges in bulk. 

CANADA STEEL GOODS COMPANY, LIMITED 

HAMILTON - CANADA 




Davidson s Well Known 

FROST RIVER 

Refrigerator shown herewith 

Made entirely of Sheet Steel Galvanized 

The exterior is Japanned French Grey, beautifully finished with 
neatly decorated panels and corner scrolls. 

The Food Chamber is coated with white enamel, thoroughly hard- 
ened and baked on in an oven of high temperature. 

All inside parts are removable for cleaning purposes. 

The drip pipe for the waste water has been carried outside the 
body, and does not run through the Food Chamber — as usual in other 
refrigerators. 

Made in three sizes, the largest with double doors. 

NOW is the time to get your Orders in 

for these goods and ensure 

prompt shipment. 

The Thos. Davidson Mfg, Co. 



Toronto 



LIMITED 
Montreal 



Winnipeg 



// interested, tear out this page and place with letters to be answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




LET the Dealers' Service Department of the Plymouth 
Cordage Company help you install an attractive sales- 
producing window. 
They are always ready to co-operate with Plymouth Deal- 
ers. Their book of instructions on window trimming is 
replete with suggestions for seasonable windows, profusely 
illustrated and easy to follow. 

The display material furnished all Plymouth Dealers is 
interesting and instructive. Many hardware dealers have 
gained regular customers through a Plymouth Rope win- 
dow. The satisfactory service given by the Plymouth Rope 
they bought has brought them back again and again when 
in need of other things. 

If you are a Plymouth Dealer you should avail yourself 
of this service. If you are not selling Plymouth Rope now 
it is a good time to begin; the service is yours when you 
begin selling Plymouth. 

PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 

North Plymouth, Mass. Welland, Canada 

INDEPENDENT CORDAGE COMPANY, LIMITED 

TORONTO, - CANADA 

Canadian Sales Agents 




THERE'S MORE PROFIT IN i 

PLYMOUTH ROPE 




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HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



"YANKEE" TOOLS 

PUSH DRILL No. 44 
Saves Time at Every Turn 

Here you have a rapid fire drill, with 
adjustable tension for hard or soft 
woods and the 8 different size 
Drill Points furnished 
with it. 



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A turn of the cap 
does the trick that saves 
time, labor and Drill Points. 
. This drill is about as valuable 
to the average mechanic as any 
"Yankee" Tool we make. Built for 
hard service. 

Your Jobber Can Supply 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



OFFICIAL 

AWAR D 
Rl BBON 




PANAMA PACIFIC 

INTERNATIONAL 

EXPOSITION 

SAN FRANCISCO 

1915 



i^.^:^ 



PRESlircitTOfTUt SUfERlOR JUBY 



DlRECTCiiOFEXHIBfTS 



-w-^-Al-cVC 



EViEDAL 



DEPARTMENT OF 

MANUFACTURESAND 
VARIED INDUSTRIES 




TRIMO TOOLS 




Nut with Nut Guards 

BE sure to ask for the 
Trimo Wrenches, 
both Pipe and Monkey. 
They are equipped with 
Nut Guards that pre- 
vent the accidental turn- 
ing of the adjusting nut 
in close quarters, and 
with Steel Frames in the 
principal size that will 
not break. 

SEND FOR CATALOG 
NO. 55. 

T R I MO NT 
MFG. CO. 

55-71 Amory Street 
Roxbury, Mass. 
U.S.A. 



TBIMO PIPE WBSNOH 
WOOD HANDIiE 




WITH FLAT-LINK OB CABLK CHAIM 



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July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




■M 



The Needs of the Empire 



m-. V 



NEVER BEFORE in the history of Canada has greater 
^^ (1^ opportunity been offered her Sons and Daughters to 

render SERVICE to the Empire; — and 

NEVER BEFORE have the needs of the Empire 
demanded as high a standard of QUALITY in thought, 
deed and product as at present. 

HOW NOBLY CANADA has responded is now known 
around the World and history will record it for the future. 

THE PRODUCTS OF OUR MILLS are at the Fronts 
and on the Seas, in the Shipyards and Factories and in 
the Fields, faithfully fulfilling their mission of reliable 
performance wherever the Government's War- Winning 
Programme directs, as we are, and have been, stripped for 
action since the first call to arms. 



THE NEEDS OF THE EMPIRE are many and the 
War-Wmning Programme changes as necessity demands; 
but it matters not, the needs of the Empire are paramount 
and must be supplied. 

THEREFORE, if in these trying times, we do not deliver 
promptly to you such of the products of our Mills or 
Blast Furnaces as you may need, console yourself with 
the thought that through us, you are rendering Service 
\ l^\ to the Empire and to the Cause that matters most for 

the Liberty, Justice and Freedom of the World. 

THE 

STEEL COMPANY 

OF 

CANADA 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON MONTREAL 



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10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



^StanW^ob 




Bailey Iron Planes 

The Standard For More Than Fifty Years 

Made by the most skilled Plane makers in the world. 



The average Carpenter invariably demands a Bailey. 

He learned his trade by their use as did his father before him. 
You never have to "carry over" a Bailey Plane. They are always 
in demand and constitute one of the m.ost staple articles a Hard- 
ware Dealer stocks. 

Improvements are constantly being made in their manufac- 
ture, tending to make them daily more popular and more sought 
after by discriminating Carpenters and Mechanics. 

If you do not carry these Planes, arrange to do so at once. 
You will be surprised how your Plane sales will increase. 

MADE IN THE CANADIAN WORKS 

OF THE 

StanleyRule 8t Level Co. 

New Britain. Conn. U.S.A. 



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July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



Screw Plates 



Eveiy Garage 
needs a Set of 

Little Giant 

Taps aW Dies 






'•IrtKaT^;; 



tft«?aBS'!»rww!«M?»»*sG: I 




Little Giant Combination Screw 
Plates are a very important part of 
the working equipment of every 
ap-to-date garage. 

They contain taps and dies for cut- 
ting practically all sizes of screw 
threads found in automobile, truck 
or tractor construction, and besides 
the regulation stock and tap 
wrench, many of them contain a 
Bit Brace Die Holder which is very 
useful in threading out-of-the-way 
parts without removing them from 
the car. 

Little Giant Screw Plates are made 
and backed by the largest tap and die 
manufacturers in the world. 

Have you the latest Little Giant Cata- 
log and Discount? 



Wells Brothers Co. 
of Canada, Ltd. 

E [;Galt,'Ontario 



Sales]Agents : Canadian Fairbanks-Morse 
••■•'- Company, Limited 



Canadian Factory : Greenfield Tap and Die 
Corporation 



V^' 



;. 




If interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be anstvered. 



12 



HARDAVARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



The Blacksmith, the 
Carpenter, the Local 
Garage and Every Manu- 
facturer in Your Neigh- 
borhood Uses Files 

These men will buy "Famous Five" 
files without question because they 
know them to be standard grade 
tools ; hard, sharp, and well bal- 
anced. 

That's why it will pay you to sell 
them. 

Specify "Famous Five" when 
ordering from your jobber. 

They are : 





WHY NOT BE GUIDED 
BY THE JUDGMENT OF 
HUNDREDS OF WELL 
KNOWN LUMBERMEN, 
WHO ACKNOWLEDGE 
THE SUPERIORITY OF 

"SAGER AXES" 

AND 

"SOO LINE" 
LOGGING 

TOOLS? 

GET THE HABIT. 

(AND THE PROFIT) 

Canadian Warren 
Axe & Tool Co. 

LIMITED 
ST. CATHARINES. ONT. 





Soo Line 
Logging Tools 



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July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



Stores, churches, lodges and homes 

There is no limit to the 
number of prospects in 
your neighborhood for 
Metallic Ceiling and Wall 
plate jobs. 

Just a suggestion from 
you will often land a big 
profitable job and we will 
handle all the detail of 
figuring and planning for 
you. 

First, get our big illustrated 
catalogue and information 
about our dealer service. 



Stock carried by 

GEO. W. REED & CO., LTD. 

37 St. Antoine Street Montreal 




Desit,n Registered 1916 



i|^^iffli^^^^^8M™wP 



TORONTO 







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Two Good Lines That 

Always Make Good 

A stock of these two dependable sellers will bring you many 
profitable sales and give you a satisfied customer with every one. 

The 

"NEW MILO" DOOR HANGER 
and THE "T-F" SPRING HINGE 

should be included in every Hardware dealer's stock. 



We take pride in producing a quality article, and we stand back of 
these two lines, guaranteeing them to be all your customers expect, 
and more. 

We are the largest Hardware manufacturers in Canada, and will be 
glad to send you particulars about any lines you may require. 

Write us. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Limited, Guelph, Ontario 

// interested, tear out this page and place with letters to be answered. 




14 



HARDWARE AND METAT. 



July 6, 1918 



COLD 
ROLLED 



Also in 

SQUARE 

HEXAGON 

FLAT 

STRIP 

FLAT WIRE 



IRON & STEEL 
MERCHANTS 



SHAFTING 



20' Lengths 



330 bars 

56 

41 
202 

88 

20 

25 

20 

33 

16 

20 

175 

106 

6 

103 

9 

14 
5 



Dia. 

1" 

1 1 16" 

IVs" 
1 3 16' 
11/4" 
1 5 16" 
1%" 
1%" 
1 11/16" 
1 13/16' 
1%" 

1 15/16' 
2" 
2%" 

2 7^16" 
21/2" 

2 11 16" 
2%" 



Dia. 

8 bars 2 13 16" 

6 " ZYs" 

72 " 2 15 16" 

45 " 3" 

10 " 3 1 16" 

20 " 3 316" 

2 " 314" 

64 " 3 7 16 ' 

10 " 31/2" 

5 " ?>%" 

9 " 4 3 16" 

2 " 4 5/I6" 

6 " 41^" 

3 " 4%" 

4 " 4%" 

5 " A%" 

3 " 51/8" 

8 " 5 3 16" 



GET OUR STOCK LIST 



IN 



STOCK 



NICKEL 
STEEL 

and 

BARS 

SHEETS 

SHAPES, etc. 

of all kinds 



TORONTO 



BAINES & PECKOVER 



98-116 ESPLANADE 



18-22 




Down goes cost of gasoline 

The Powerlight Manifold Heater for Ford Cars — Guaranteed 
to save 25% to 40% on gasoline. The most useful accessory 
ever put on any car. 
Installed in a few minutes. 

Price $7 complete with full directions for installing. 
Four Outstanding Advantages. 

1. The Powerlight Manifold Heater for Ford Cars will save 
from 25 to 40 per cent, on gasoline, which means more 

• mileage. 

2. It heats the gasoline after it leaves the carburetor and 
as it enters the manifold intake so that it will enter into the 
cylinders in a dry, intensely combustible state. Every 
cylinder will receive the same quality gas, for every particle 



of the gasoline has been thoroughly vaporized and will cause a much better mixture. 
In consequence, more power. 

3. It will reduce by 50 per cent, the carbon deposits in the cylinder walls, valves 
and spark plug, for where there is no heating device of any sort the gasoline enters 
the cylinders in a semi-liquid state, causing a red, smoky flame. This is especially 
true of the low grade gasoline of to-day. Result, perfect firing. 

4. It will do way with spark plug and valve troubles and lessens the chances of 
leaky valves, doing away with the necessity of grinding valves or burning out the 
cylinders, and causes a much smoother running of the engine, therefore, longer 
life for the engine. 

Manufactured by 

The Powerlight Co., of Winnipeg 

A few good select territories still open. 




If interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



Whymm Should Be A 
Michelin Dealer 

No. 





Michelin Reputation Adds 
Salability to Your Entire Stock 



Practically every motorist realizes that Michelin Tires are 
unsurpassed for Durability and Value. 

The discrimination with which Michelin Dealers 
are selected and the wide publicity which has been 
given to the instruction to look for the Michelin 
Sign on Leading Stores and Garages — means that 
the dealer who displays the Michelin sign at once 
secures prestige for handling trustworthy goods. 

This accounts for the prosperity which Michelin Dealers 
enjoy in all departments of their business. 

It will pay you to look into the Michelin Dealer Proposition. 
Write todav for full information. 



Michelin Tire Co. of Canada, Limited 

782 St. Catherine St. W., Montreal 




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16 



k. 



HARD AV A RE AND M E T A L 



July 6, 1918 




5 Minute • Vulcanizer 




Mends Tubes in 5 Minutes 



J 



EASY TO USE— EASY TO SELL 



Every buyer of a SHALER 5-Minute 
Vulcanizer becomes a booster! Every 
motorist who buys one shows it to his 
friends — gives them a demonstration — 
because it is such a wonderful thing. 



This means big sales for you. As soon as you 
start selling- the SHALER 5-Minute Vulcanizer, 
your customers will spread the news. You 
will quickly notice new faces in your store — 
new customers passing their money across 
your counters. 



Complete Outfit ^l^priVnHt $2.00 in Canada 



The dozen patches and combustible discs that 
go with the vulcanizer are soon used up — and 
the motorist comes back to you for more. He 
pays you 75 cents for every dozen of these 
units. You make a good profit. 



Can you realize what a big repeat business 
this means for you ? Can't you see how it will 
bring car owners into your place for additional 
"ammunition" — who will also buy other goods ? 
And that is what you need to build up your 
business. 



Place Your Order With Your Jobber NOW! 



are building a large 3-story addition to our plant. But 
— to make sure of prompt shipments — place your order 
with your jobber now — specifying date of shipment 
desired. 



Don't delay! The enormous demand for 
SHALER 5-Minute Vulcanizers has exceeded 
our factory capacity to make deliveries. We 

Complete catalog of full line of SHALER Vulcanizers 
for Motorists, Garages and Repair Shops mailed on request 

C. A. Shaler Company, 1506 Fourth Street, Waupun, Wis., U.S.A. 



«^ 



dwudiaattiiui 



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HARDWARE AND METAL 





SIDE arms are carried by many sportsmen in the woods. 
Quick shooting at game birds or target practice in camp adds 
to the interest of the hunting trip. Personal and home pro- 
tection requires a dependable revolver and dependable 
ammunition. 

Dominion 

Revolver Cartridges 

are the dependable brand. Quick action and accuracy — ^the main 
points in good revolver cartridges — are assured in Dominion cartridges 
because they are tested in all kinds of revolvers, good and bad. They 
must function perfectly and produce extreme accuracy before they get 
into the hands of your customer. 

Many revolver clubs in Canada are using Dominion .455 with the 
gallery charge of powder and the "wad cutting" bullet. 

Dominion Pistol Cartridges are made for 

Colt S. & W. H. & R. 

H. & A. Webley 

Savage Browning 

and many other revolvers. 

Dominion Cartridge Company, Limited 

120 St. James St., 
Montreal. 




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18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 






FIVE WORKS— OVER 3,000 EMPLOYEES 

UNITED BRASS FOUNDERS 

and ENGINEERS, Limited 

EMPRESS FOUNDRY 

Cornbrooky Manchester, England 

It is our intention after the 
War to devote our energies 
to the intensive production of 
the following Specialities : 

Guametal and Brass Valves and Cocks. 

Steam, Water and Compressed Air Fittings 

generally. 
Cast Iron Stop and Sluice Valves. 
Semi-Rotary Pumps. 
Extruded Brass and Bronze Bars. 
Brass Bolts and Nuts, Studs and General Turned 

Work from the Bar 
Cast and Malleable Iron Cocks and Pipe Fittings. 
Pressure and Vacuum Gauges. 
Injectors, Engine Governors. 
Spraying Machinery. 
Coppersmiths' Work. 

"Stella" Brand Alloys, Manganese Copper, Sili- 
con Copper, Ferro Zinc, Phosphor Copper 
and Tin, etc. 



Business After the War 

If you arc interested in any or all of the lines 
mentioned and are in a position to take a hand 
in the energetic distribution of the same , please 
communicate with us NOW to our Head Office 
at the above address. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



v.* 




The old way 



The new way 



A man should not do the work a 
machine will do for him 



A merchant, with all his troubles, 
should never do the work that a machine 
does better and quicker. 

Our newest model National Cash 
Register makes the records which a 
merchant needs to control his business. 
It does fifteen necessary things in three 
seconds. 

Without the register a man cannot do 
these things in half an hour. 



With the register, even a new clerk can 
do them just by pressing the keys. 

Our new electric machines are as much 
better than old machines as an up-to-date 
harvester is ahead of a sickle for cutting 
grain. 

The latest model National Cash Register 
is a great help to merchants and clerks. 
It pays for itself out of what it saves. 



Merchants need National Cash Registers now more than ever before 



Fill out this 
coupon and mail 
to-day 



Dept. C13, The National Cash Register Company of Canada, Limited, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Please give full particulars about the up-to-date N.C.R. System for 
niv kind of business. 



N; 



ame . 



Business. 
Address . 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



Wrouqhtand Steel 

WASHE 

of all descriptions 




Round & Square 
Plain or 
Galvanized 





Annealed 

Rivet Burrs. 

Felloe Plates. 

Sheared and 

Punched Plates. 



Malleable Washers 
and Cast Iron Washers. 

Prompt Shipments 



Wrought Washer Mfg, 
Company 



Milwaukee, Wis. 



When in need of 

Wrapping Paper 
Twines &Cordage 



B 



rooms 
rushes 
askets 



Grocers' Sundries 



Walter Woods & Co. 

Hamilton & Winnipeg 



A Good Thing Free 

Hardware and Metal has secured another supply of pamphlets, con- 
taining the four Stockdale lectures, for free distribution to the trade. 

Under the following captions one of America's foremost Retail Mer- 
chandising Experts gaye in a clear, lucid style the why and where- 
fores of the success and failures in retail stores: 

"Many Businesses Wrecked by Details" 

"How to Make Figure Facts Earn Profits" 

"How to Measure the Value of Turnover" 

"How to Get the Information the Customer Wants" 

We have had these printed for our readers and will gladly supply copies 
free upon request, so long as our supply lasts. Send for your copy now. 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

143-153 University Ave. 
Toronto, Canada 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 




PRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTORS OF 

RED WING PUMPS 



SEMI-ROTARY. DOUBLE-ACTING. 

MADE IN CANADA. 

FIG. 120 

This type of Pump, formerly imported from 
Germany but now made by us, is well known to 
the trade, and its efficiency as a practical and easy- 
working Lift and Forcf pump has been fully 
recognized. 

It is finely finished in the interior and abso- 
lutely air-tight. The lever is vertical and worked 
in that position. 

Exceedingly convenient for attach- 
ing to wall. Brass Valves. Fitted for 
Iron Pipe. 

SIZES AND CAPACITIES 










Full Strokes 


Gallons 








of Lever per 


Delivered 


No. 


For 


Pipe 


Minute 


per Minute 





V2 inch 


104 


4% gals. 


1 


% 




100 


7 


2 


1 




90 


9 


3 


11/4 




85 


11 


4 


1% 




80 


15 


5 


iy2 




75 


19 


6 


1% 




60 


22 






PAINTED RED 





Complete stock of pumps of all sizes and styles. Immediate ship- 
ment on receipt of orders. f^^^^M^%'*-^ ^ i._...^i.. 




PRODUCED AT 



THE JAMES SMART PLANT 



BROCKVILLE, ONT. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 




22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 




SMALL MACHINES 

Are Made for Service. They Combine 
Durability, Speed and Accuracy 



No Tinshop can afford to be without a set of these machines 
We manufacture a full Hne of Tinners' Tools 

Drop us a line for ful particulars and prices 

The Brown-Boggs Co., Limited 

Hamilton, Canada 





|liltlllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllll[|||l|l|||||||||||||||1|||||||||!|!|i|!|{|||j|l|||i||||^ 



Fairbanks Scales 

For over 85 years Fairbanks 
Scales have been the World's 
Standard for accurate weighing. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 

"Canada'* Departmental House for Mechanical Goods" 

St. John. Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto. Hamilton, 

Windsor, Winnipeg. Saslcatoon. Calgary, 

Vancouver, Victoria 




Canadian Rivet Forges are 
built to last. 

Easy running blower, power- 
ful, uniform blast, rigid steel 
plate construction. 

Write for Catalog 100-19. 

Canadian Blower & Forge Co. 

Kitchener, Ont, 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



■--w-;v:i«*rv- - 



23: 



$K^ 



K 



.^, 



Your Customers' Best Friends 

The machinists' best friends are his Starrett Tools. They help him to 
earn his bread and butter and enable him to perform high-grade accurate 
work which commands high wages. They enable him to lift himself out 
of the "ordinary workman" class into the "skilled mechanic" class. 

If when entering your store the machinist sees familiar Starrett instru- 
ments in the case, he will feel instantly that he has come to the rijjht 
place, for Starrett Tools are always accepted as a standard of quality. 

Send for catalog MA. 

THE L. S. STARRETT COMPANY 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST TOOLMAKERS 
MFRS. OF HACK SAWS UNEXCELLED 

ATHOL, MASSACHUSETTS 



NEW YORK 

LONDON 

CHICAGO 

42-8(15 



<QO\J3^ 



24 



\ 



\j 



HARDWARE AND METAT. 



1/ 



■ III III! 

nil nil 



!!!! !!! ;;: • 

;'; I!! It! i; iii 

IJII III III III '.•! 



[/ 



/ 



July 6, 1918 



y 



In the Hoyt Metal Co.'s plant a body of 
picked men, headed by the best metal 
mixer in Canada, work intelligently, 
enthusiastically, energetically, bent on 
turning out the best metals man can 
make. Under a perfect, smooth-work- 



ing system entirely devoid of "red tape," 
they are giving manufacturing Canada 
the benefit of years of experience in the 
alloying of metals. They are putting a 
quality into Hoyt Metals that can be 
found in no other alloys. 



HOYT METAL CO., TORONTO 

New York, N.Y. London, Eng. St. Louis, Mo. 



Trucks that fit any business 




''Little Giant" Trucks are built to 
efficiently solve your delivery problems. 
Worm Drive for one, two, three and a 
half and five tons. 



NOTE: — One- Year Guarantee backed 
by a Corporation w^ith resources of 
$14,000,000. 



Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Limited 



For Territorial Agenciea, write 

Montreal Office 



345 CRAIG STREET WEST 
MONTREAL 



BRANCH: 

107 Church St., Toronto 



if avj aduerti-^emfiit interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 




v^/r \\l .1\ \ i i\\ ii il 



Just what the 

Hardware Dealer 

Needs in His Motor 
Delivery Body. There's 
Plenty of Space and 
Load Capacity in the 





WHAT load will it carry ? This question is asked 
by every enquirer after Commercial Bodies. 
The carrying capacity depends on the body. The 
heavy body means a smaller load ; the light body 
means greater capacity for goods. The less total 
weight of the body, the greater the weight that can 
be used in the load. The Babcock Commercial 
Body is one-third lighter than the ordinary Com- 
mercial Body; therefore, by equipping your motor 
with a Babcock Body, you can add that much more 
weight to the load that safety and speed will allow. 

Exactly Suited to the Hardware 
Business 

Our style No. 1, the Open Express, and our style No. 2, with a 
canopy top, represent the popular styles for delivery motors. The 
Canopy top is quickly put on and has side curtains to use in in- 
clement weather. The bodies are rigid and strong, with founda- 
tion of steel. The patented method of mounting prevents rack- 
ing and weaving and makes the Babcock the most durable and 
economical body on the market. 

Write for Illustrated Folder and Prices 

AGENTS WANTED-Write for Terms 



MADE IN CANADA 





CARRIAGE FACTORIES, LIMITED 

Head Office: Excelsior Life Bldg., TORONTO. Sales Offices: Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918; 



ulllllllilllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllillllilllllllliHIillilinillllllllllllillllU! 

— » .■■■■■■■■■■■■ mil njijtijimi[!ui!ini«tmiimjn»iti» tnn •■ iiiii !•■ ■■ ■ ■•>i>t>i<iiii>iii< nnm iimimtnnnim ii — 













ft 







The Mechanic Says: 

Boss, Get Me Aloxite Cloth Every Time" 

T TE knows it cuts faster and cleaner, 
"* •* lasts longer and gives a more uni- 
form finish — that it is more practical 
and cheaper in the end than the old- 
time emery cloth. 

Aloxite Cloth — 

The cloth that cuts is 
put up in economy rolls 

and should be in your stock. Every 
general mechanic, garage man and repair 
man can use it The factories in your 
town need it. The market for it is big 
and profitable. 

Aloxite Cloth is a Carborundum prod- 
uct and that establishes its quality. 

Suppose you write our 
hardware department. 

Are you using Carborundum advertising and 
trade helps to your advantage? 



I^THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY 

NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO BOSTON PHILADELPHIA CLEVELAND CINCINNATI PITTSBURGH 

MILWAUKEE GRAND RAPIDS 











rrrrrrrriTi 



■ r ■■■TT riTrrrrrTTi'ivir • 



CTIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllHlilllllillMIIIIIIMIIIIIIlilllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllilillllllllllllillllt' 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



EAVES 
TROUGH 




CONDUCTOR 
PIPE 



ELBOWS, SHOES, HOOKS, HANGERS, MITRES AND ENDS 




No. 830— Lap Joint Half-Round Eare Trougrh 




No. 831— Ogee Square Bpad Eave Trough 




'J^^i^iii^^^mff'e§;f1^ 



--; ^fii:iyiv, ^i\ 



No. 847— Ogee Round Bead Eave Trough 




mmrr 



— &„ 



itJ:.i^ltL„^.^....ri,.: 






No. 890 — Slip Joint Half-Round Eave Trough. Single Bead 



In a large 
variety of 
gauges g a 1 - 
vani^ed Steel 
or in Anti Cor- 
rosive Toncan 
Metal when 
desired. The 
latter is r e- 
commended for 
places where 
Steel is likely 
to be affected 
by corrosion. 
All Pedlar 
Pipe and Fit- 
tings are gu- 
aranteed flaw- 
less in materi- 
al and work- 
manship. 




No. 840— Plain Round Conducter Pipe 
Crimped at one end for easy joining. 10 feet long. 



Mli<>it l i1i i Wilt< l ' W>< tW «i .M)iT i fe< '' 'i i J« »<ii« '» ii'if l» W l W 

No. 841— Round Corrugated Conductor Pipe 
Crimped at one end for easy joining. 10 feet ^ong* 




No. 850- Square Corrugated Conductor Pipe 

Will not burst from freezing. End Crimped. 10 feet long. 




No. 854 — Octagon Standing Seam Conductor Pipo 
Stock sizes— 3, 4 and S inches — 10 feet long. 



Write Us To-day for Catalog H.M. and Discounts. 

THE PEDLAR PEOPLE LIMITED 

Established 1861 

Executive Offices and Factories: OSHAWA, ONT. 

Branches :Montreal, Ottavsra, Toronto, London, Winnipeg, Vancouver 



FAIRBANKS VALVES 





Renewable Disc Valves 

The only tool required is a wrench to 
remove the bonnet. The vise, hammer and 
cold chisel are all eliminated. Once sold 
always demanded by your trade. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 

"Canada's Departmental House for 
Mechanical Goods" 

St, John, Quebec, Mintreal, Ottawa, 
Toronto: Hamilton, Windsor, Winnipeg, 
Saskatoon, Calgary Vancouver. Victoria, 



&IMJMMI1J1111DI1M 



^=2 



Mi 




A Warm Weather Quick Seller 

When the mercury is high and housewives 
want to iron in comfort, easy sales are 
ready and waiting for you. Prospects are 
half sold on the 



Royal 



Self- 
Heating 



Iron 



It's simple, it's sure, it's sound in principle 
and design — 850,000 satisfied users now, and 
more being added every day. 
Heat regulated instantly — highly polished 
and nickel-plated. 

Write us now for details, also name and ad- 
dress of nearest Canadian distributor. 

CADMAN & BAUSLAUGH 

322 Mclntyre Block, Winnipeg, 

Western Canadian Representatives. 

ROYAL IRON MFG. COMPANY 



556 Wayne Street 



Big Prairie, Ohio, U.S.A. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



28 HARDWAREANDMETAL July 6, 1918 

National Tariff Commission 

Proposed to Consolidate 

Canadian Prosperity 

44 T 7NTIL the tariff question is taken out of politics Canada is in danger of being di- 
^ vided into two camps. Over the question of high tariff or low tariff two great 
groups of the builders of Canadian prosperity hold different views. Manufacturers and 
farmers of the Dominion are divided on this vital matter and business men, wholesalers, 
retailers, and others who are neither manufacturers nor farmers are closely concerned." 

Constructive Plan to Bridge Perilous Gulf 

"The difficulty," says THE FINANCIAL POST, "is that the gulf between the opposing interests is 
being widened by the very efforts which have been planned to bring them together. It has been pro- 
posed that there be a conference of Eastern and Western interests at which the matter may be talked 
over in a business way. . . Such a conference will avail little if there is not set down for con- 
sideration some definite constructive policy. . . . THE POST'S idea is to have the Government 
appoint a. commission of, say, seven members, two to represent the agricultural or low tariff interests, 
two to represent manufacturing or high tariff inteiests, two to represent workmen, with the chairman- 
ship in the hands of an independent authority. . ." 

An Editorial Feature of an Outstanding Issue 

These brief quotations from the leading article in the Annual Government and Municipal Number of THE FIN- 
ANCIAL POST now on sale give but a glimpse into an immensely important contribution to Canadian busi- 
ness plans for after-the-war prosperity. Read this powerful editorial in its proper setting amongst the vitally 
important business news of the Dominion at date — June 29th — dealt with under such heads as these: — 

Transcontinental Freight Rates to Advance Aug. 1st 

Canada's Outlook For New Capital From the United States 
New Company Created to Operate the Ross Rifle Factory 
Dry Weather Has Lowered Expectations as to the Crops 
Farmers Accused of Gambling in Western Land Values 
^ New^ Rules Now^ Govern Sales of Dominion Lands 

Life Insurance as a Factor of Business Life 

Remuneration Justified For Selling Victory Bonds 

These are only^ a few of the principal subjects of articles in this issue apart from the comprehensive special 
matter it contains on the resources and financial standing of the Dominion, the Provinces and municipalities 
with all important factors bearing upon Canada's economic position at present. This issue of THE FINANCIAL 
POST OF Canada is one to send for and keep. Write to-day for a copy of it. and decide at the same time 
to have a subscription to THE POST which costs $3.00 a year, and which as an investment will richly pay you. 
Use this form, or just sign it and pin your letterhead to it. 

Annual Subscription $3.00. 

THE FINANCIAL POST OF CANADA, 

143-153 University Ave., Toronto. 
Please enter me as a regular subscriber to THE FINANCIAL POST OF CANADA, commencing 
with current issue. I enclose (will forward) $3.00 to pay for my subscription for the first year, or you 
may draw on me for this amount. 

Name 

H. & M. 

' Address 

^, (Please write plainly) 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



For Temporary Construction 

There is always a strong demand for a thoroughly 
reliable, waterproof, durable roofing at a low price. 
Our Standard Mohawk Roofing meets this demand. 
It has been tested for years and found entirely satis- 
factory. 

Standard Mohawk Roofing 




is specially recommended for covering the roof and sides 
of temporary homes, factories, saw mills, bunk houses, 
sheds, camp sites, etc. 

Standard Mohawk consists of the same grade of felt 
and asphalt as our famous Brantford Asphalt Roofing 
but is lighter in weight and sanded on one side only. 
One weight only — 40 lb. per square. 

The same grade of roofing with a smooth surface — 
Mohawk Rubber Roofing — comes in 35 lb., 45 lb. and 
55 lb. weights. 



Another excellent, roofing for the same purposes is 
our leatheroid Roofing. Not quite so durable as Mo- 
hawk, but lower in price — 35 lb., 45 lb. and 55 lb. weights. 

We make roofings suitable for every purpose, for 
covering the humble shack and the costly home, the 
temporary saw mill and the permanent, fire-proof fac- 
tory. 

Brantford Roofing is a profitable line for the dealer 
to handle. 



Brantford Roofing Co 



'..Limited 



Head^Office and Factory, Brantford, Canada 
Branches at Toronto, Montreal, Halifax 



HYSLOP BICYCLES 



Men's 1918 Juvenile Model 



Men's 1918 Empire Model 




Have 

Made 

Bicycle 

Enthusiasts 




m 



ALL WALKS OF LIFE 

They are the "Knights" of the Road. 

Mr. Hardware Dealer: — Have you made their acquaintance yet? Feature them in your store 
— then watch your Business grow ! 

Let us tell you about our unique proposition. Act NOW. 



HYSLOP BROTHERS, LIMITED 

Shuter and Victoria Streets ... Toronto, Ontario 



30 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 








American Self- 
Oiling Grinders 

Manufactured by 

American Grinder 
Mfg. Co. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Will find a ready 
sale in Canadian 
hardware stores. 
Anyone who has 
tools to sharpen will 
readily recognize the 
superior features of 
these grinders. Let 
us recommend your 
displaying them in 
your windows and 
stores. 



Leading jobbers cata- 
logue and sell them. 



Agents for Canada 
Merchants Hardware Specialties Co., Calgrary, Alta. ; D. Philip, 
138 Portagre Ave. East, Winnipeg, Man.; John H. Graham & Co., 
113 Chambers Street, New York City. 



Manufacturers 



OF 



WIRE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Wire Bale Ties 

LARGEST CAPACITY AND STOCK 
IN CANADA 

Prompt Shipment 

LAIDLAW BALE TIE 
COMPANY, Limited 

HAMILTON, CANADA 

Winnipeg Toronto Montreal 

London, England 



SPRINKLERS 







Order the style that best fits 

your lawn. Stock Style D, 

F & J. 

B. Sprinklers are made in four styles so that 
different shaped lawns may be irrigated. Thex 
do not throw water on side to which hose is 
attached; therefore, may be picked up and moved 
without turning off the water. 

The only Sprinkler that will irrigate the lawn 
right to the edge of the sidewalk without wetting 
the walk. 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co. 

LIMITED 

OTTAWA, ONTARIO 




^dni Flush 



For 

Cleaning 

Closet Bovls 

Only 




The Sani-Flush can 
itself is a goodj^ad- 
vertisement. It is 
colored attractively 
to catch the eye, and 
tells the whole story 

ALWAYS KEEP CANS OF 

Sani-Flush 

WHERE CUSTOMERS CAN SEE THEM 



Your display of Sani-Flush will make an immediate 
connection with the manufacturer's magazine ad- 
vertising. It will enable your customers to buy 
Sani-Flush without any embarrassing questions. 

Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Limited 

10-12 McCaul Street, Toronto. Ont. 



QUICK 
E/VSV 

SANITA"^ 



// avj advertif^cmi'iit interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



Can You Imagine a Man or Boy 

Who Wouldn't Like to Own This Kit ? 

No matter what a man's occupation may be, he will find daily use for the "So 
Handy" Pocket Knife Tool Kit. Autoist, Sportsman, Hunter, Farmer, Boy 
Scout — these, especially, will find it a pleasing and practical pocket companion. 
Excellent, too, for use around the home. 

Outfit comprises a splendid Jack Knife with cocoa handle and an exceptionally 
good blade, and the following tools which can be instantly attached to the 
knife handle: File, Chisel, Reamer, Screw Driver, Bottle Opener, Gimlet and 
Rule, all made of high grade steel, carefully hardened and oil tempered. 

The So Handy Kit is made in five styles. Jobbers — get posted about this good specialty. 




Mm 



RETAIL PRICE $1.50. 



THE BRIDGEPORT HARDWARE MFG. CO. 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN., U.S.A. 



PRESCOTT W. ROBINSON, Canadian Representative, 414 Drummond Building, Montreal 




WILLIAMS' "VULCAN" 

DROP-FORGED SAFETY LATHE DOGS 

GUARANTEED 

Tools in constant use should have qualities of strength and wear which 
will make them fit for many years of duty. WILLIAMS' product is 
all designed and made with that purpose. 

A good tool helps you and is a constant and good advertisement for 
us. We guarantee that every tool we sell shall fulfill the purposes of 
strength, wear and utility. Cata'.og free. 

J. H. WILLIAMS & CO. - 30 Richards St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
"The DROP-FORGING PEOPLE" 

Western Office and Warehouse: 30 So. Clinton St., Chicago, 111. 

The A. G. Low Co., Ltd., 30 Pacific Ave., Saskatoon, Sask. 
Agents for Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia 





"DOMINION" 

COTTON AND WOOL WASTE 

AND COTTON WIPERS, 

WASHED AND STERILIZED 

A WASTE FOR EVERY USE 

6 Grades White Cotton Wiping Waste 

5 Grades Colored Cotton Wiping Waste 

4 Grades Wool Packing Waste 

3 Grades Cotton Wipers, Washed and Sterilized. 

Samples with Prices on Request 

Scythes & Company Limited 

Montreal TORONTO, ONT. Winnipeg 



©•M-@ 




TRADE^MARK 



Seasonable 
Suggestion 



No. 1 





A popular, fast selling line — profit- 
able to push— and chuck full of 
service and satisfaction to your 
customer. That's what the Col- 
lins' trade mark means to you. 
Collins' sprayers, patent stove 
pipe, floor thimbles, ash sifters, 
etc., are the best that money can 
buy. 

Just now you will find it profitable 
to push the lines that aid in pro- 
duction of food-stuffs. Sprayers 
every year save milions of dollars 
worth of nation's food supplies. 

Ready to ship same day as 

order received. 

Order through your jobber 
or direct from 

The Collins Mfg. Co. 

415 Symington Ave. 
TORONTO 





32 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6» 1918 



MADE IN CANADA 

Blacksmiths' 
Boiler Makers' 
Machinists' 

AND 

Pipe Fitters' 

Tools WrUe^^r 



A. B. Jardine & Co. 

LIMITED 

HESPLER, ONT. 



Kills The Losses 



Why should housewives take all the risk in regard to honest 
mistakes in weighing ? It certainly is easy to convince her 
she shouldn't, and that a Renfrew scale will save not only 
risk but many actual losses. That builds up sales for you. 

An ordinary, doubtful scale would only add useless disputes. 
The Renfrew is accurate for every weight from 14 oz. to 30 
lbs., and its owner can prove her weights every time by means 
of the Government Inspector's Certificate which goes with every 
Renfrew. 

The Renfrew is made in black finish, or in all-nickel finish 
suitable for candy stores or homes desiring something a little 
bit better. Write for literature and attractive selling propo- 
sition. 




J^firew^ 



HOUSEHOLD 
SCALE 



Guaranteed to 
weigh accurately. 
Capacity: % oz. 
to 30 lbs. 



The Renfrew Machinery Co., Limited 

Head Office and Works, Renfrew, Ont. 
Eastern Branch, Sussex, N.B. 

Western Representatives : P. A. C. Mclntyre & Co., 1206 Mc- 

Arthur Bldg., Winnipeg, Man. ; Crandall Co., Ltd., Vancouver, 

B.C. 

Our Other Lines: "Renfrew" Cream Separators; 2,000-lb. 

Farmers' Truck Scale, Tractors, Wood-Saws, Grain Grinders, etc. 



Make Money from Good 
Pumps — Profit 



not give 



Unless a metal pump is made just 
right it will leak at joints or valves. 

"Aremacdee" pumps do 
dealers who sell them 
trouble and loss from 
defective service in 
"Aremacdee" pumps 
sold customers. 

Pumps for every 
use — hand or motor- 
force or lift — every 
type a dealer can sell. 

All in the big catalogue. Ask for it — 
for dealer prices — for dealer terms. 

The 

R. McDougall Co., limited 

GALT, CANADA 





China Wood Oil Tinplates 
Lithopone Spelter 

Blue Vitriol Borax 

Glycerine, Etc. 

We have the ahove in stock and 
can make immediate shipments. 

B.& S.H.THOMPSON 

& COMPANY LIMITED 
MONTREAL 

Br«neli«« TORONTO WINNIPEG NEW GLABGOW, N.S. 

Caaaditm SaU« Acants: United State* Steel Product* Cemraar 
Exporter* for American Sheet &. Tin Plate Companr 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



"Hercules'^SashCord 

The reputation of this 
brand has been thor- 
oughly estabhshed in 
the Canadian market 
for the last eighteen 
years. It compares in 
quality with the best 
imported brands, but 
is sold at a consider- 
ably lower price and 
can be safely recom- 
mended for any job. 

All wholesale hardware dealers 
carry "Hercules" Sash Cord 
and can fill orders promptly. 

Manufactured in Canada 



Your Customers Will 
Advertise You 




If you sell 

C. C. M. Bicycles 

They will be so pleased 
with the easy running and 
long wearing qualities, not 
to mention the handsome 
appearance of these bi- 
cycles, that they will tell 
their friends about them 
and thus help to advertise 
the store itself. 

You will make no mistake in securing 
the agency for 

MASSEY RED BIRD 

CLEVELAND PERFECT 

GENDRON, COLUMBIA or 
IVANHOE 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co. Ltd. 

Montreal, Toronto, WESTON, Winnipeg, Vancouver 




Every dollar your customers 
spend in Carhartt's Dollar 
Gloves in your store will 
bring big dividends. 



Stock a few pairs 
harvest trade- 



for the 



A sample dozen will convince 
you of the Carhartt values. 

Write to-day 

HAMILTON CARHARTT COTTON MILLS LTD. 

Toronto Unit 




If interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



34 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 




This symbol, on any rubber product, is a warranty 
for quality and service. Behind it is an organization that 
has been manufacturing rubber goods for more than half 
a century. It is a guarantee that the product will stand up 
under the most trying conditions and that its service is 
easily the best to be had. 

The best way to prove our statement is to put our pro- 
ducts to the test. One of our service branches is within 
your reach. Get in touch with that branch and find out 
for yourself how well we can serve you and those you 
wish to serve. 

Everything in Rubber, 
"Made in Canada." 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. 

Limited 

HEAD OFFICE - MONTREAL 

Branches at Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Kitchener, 
London, North Bay, Fort William, Winnipeg, Brandon, Regina, Saskatoon, Cal- 
gary, Lethbridge, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria. 



ZM 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



35 



"Member Audit Bureau Circulations." 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

CANADA'S NATIONAL HARDWARE WEEKLY 

Vol. XXX. TORONTO, JULY 6. 1918 No. 27 

CONTENTS 

Enlarges Paint and Housecleaning Department 37 

Canvass and Circulars Increase Trade 40 

Events in Photograph 41 

Made Flashlights a Real Selling Line 42 

Prize Winning Sales Methods 43 

Have You Dressed up Your Auto Accessory Window? 45 

P^ditorial Comment 46 

Events in the Trade • 48 

The Clerk's Department— Browning, "Gun Man" for the United States Army. 51 

New Hardware Goods 52 

Weekly Hardware Market Reports 53 

Weekly Paint Department— Sold 40 Gallons of Paint in One Sale 60 

Weekly Paini Markets 62 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Viee-Pre8id9nt. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MacLcan's Magazine, Farmers' Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Printer and Publisher, Bookseller and 
Stationer, Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, The Power House, The Sanftary Engineer, 
Canadian Foundryman, Marine Engineering of Canada. 

Cable Address : Macpubco, Toronto : Atabek, London, Eng. 

ESTABLISHED 1887. 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

GEO. D. DAVIS, Manager and Editor. 
C. L. DUNN, Montreal Representative. G. S. WILLIAMSON, Associate Editor. 

J. C. EDWARDS, Toronto Representative. J. G. LUCAS, Associate Editor. 

E. A. HUMPHRIES, Ontario Representative. A. H. ILLSEY, Associate Editor. 

C. W. BYERS. Western Representative. H. L. SOUTHALL, Associate Editor. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

CANADA — Montreal, Southam Bldg.. 128 Bleury St. : Phone Main 1004. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave. ; Tele- 
phone Main 7324. Winnipeg, 1207 Union Trust Bldg., Telephone Main 3449. 

GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.C., E. J. Dodd, 
Director ; Telephone Central 129G0. Cable Address : Atabek, London, England. 

UNITED STATES— New York. R. B. Huestis. Room 620, 111 Broadway: Telephone Rector 8971; Boston, C. L. 
Morton, Room 733, Old South Building. Telephone Main 1024 ; A. H. Byrne, Room 900, Lytton Bldg., 14 E. 
Jackson Street, Chicago. Phone Harrison 1147. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE — 'Canada, $3 a year; Great Britain. South Africa and West Indies, 12s. 6d. a year; 
United States, $3.50 a year ; other countries, $4 a year ; Single Copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



36 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1;;'8 



ALUM 
BORAX 
BLUESTONE 
CANISTER 
FIRE CLAY 
WHITINC 
ZINC DUST 
ZINC OXIDE 



STOCK AND IMPORT 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., LIMITED 

560 St. Paul St. West, MONTREAL 



JOHN LYSAGHT 

LIMITED 

BRISTOL and NEWPORT 

Manufacturers of 
High' Grade 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 

BLACK STEEL SHEETS 

WIRE NETTING, Etc. 



John Lysaght, Limited A. G. Leslie & Co., Ltd. 

MONTREAL 

Managers for Canada 



Let ithe Women Know 



Y 



OUR store is the place where women like to be reminded of 
the household needs that have "slipped their minds." Even 
for so well-known an article as 




Polish 



a reminder is needed. Housewives will 
be glad to see O-Cedar before their eyes 
when they enter your store. Every 
woman wants 0-Cedar Polish because it 
is the quality polish — because it renews 
and protects all their furniture — because 
it cleans as it polishes. 

The extensive and powerful advertis- 
ing given 0-Cedar Products is making 
more OCedar users every year. Let 



your store be known as an O-Cedar store, 
and you will ensure your share of this 
profitable business. People will be sure 
you have it, if you utilize the convenient 
O-Cedar Sales Helps — O-Cedar Floor and 
Counter Stands; Electric Sign Displays; 
and O-Cedar advertising plates. Ask 
your jobber about yours, as well as about 
the Profit Deals that will make additional 
money for you. 



CHANNELL CHEMICAL COMPANY, LIMITED 

369 SORAUREN AVENtiE - - - TORONTO 



Canada's ^^ 



National 
Hardware 



Weekly qj 



mRDwrnE-'Mmi 



!□ Published 

Every 

Saturday 

Since 

1888 



3C3 



Vol. 30 



TORONTO, JULY 6. 1918 



No. 27 



Enlarges Paint and HousecleaningDept. 

Mills Hardware Company, Hamilton, Has Extended Width of Store at Rear — Getting 
After Spring Paint Business in an Aggressive Manner — Window Displays 
and Newspaper Advertising Bring Immediate Response 




View Showing Interior of Mills Hardwar e Company, Hamilton, Out., Since the St ore has been Remodeled. New Display 
Cases Have Been Installed and Rear Sec tion Has Been Widened to Provide for Pa int and Household Lines. 



THE Mills Hardware Company, 
Hamilton, put on an aggres- 
sive campaign this spring in the 
interests of paint-up and clean-up. In 
order to facilitate the handling of their 
business in their King street store they 
recently extended the width of their store 
in the rear from 22 feet and now have a 
store 38 feet in width, extending for a 
space of 70 feet in the rear part. The 
width of the front part of the store is 22 
feet which widens in the rear into an L 
shape. The section was extended up- 
ward for two stories and basement space 
was enlarged correspondingly. 

The section in the rear on the ground 
floor is given over entirely to paint dis- 
play, to gardening utensils and to sum- 



mer lines such as cleaners, screen doors, 
lawn mowers. "Why were you favorable 
to placing these lines in the i-ear of your 
store?" asked a HARDWARE AND 
METAL representative of Charles Mills, 
president of the company. "We consider 
it the best place for these lines because 
of the fact that they will bring people in 
through the store. When they are pass- 
ing the other lines on display in the front 
part of the store they will have a chance 
to see them. We have our lines display- 
ed in such a way that people will have 
free access to them." The various spring 
lines such as paints, seeds, brushes, lawn 
mowers, screen doors and windows were 
all priced with tickets which left no 
chance for doubt on the part of the pros- 



pective customer as to what they sold 
for. 

For several weeks in the spring the 
company put on a spring paint sale in 
which they made a drive to clean out 
some thirty odd lines and sizes. Through 
their advertisement in the daily papers, 
through window displays and through 
streamers placed in the interior of the 
store they directed attention to 
their paint. The streamers for the in- 
terior were painted on white cotton in 
bold letters. The price of the paint was 
also named. Incidentally it might be 
stated that the prices quoted were very 
little, if anything, below the normal mar- 
ket value. 

These methods have been getting paint 



38 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



business for the company. During the 
first two weeks, when the painting sea- 
son had not really started, no less than 
eight shelves were cleared of tlieir con- 
tents. "Paint is going well,", said Mr. 
Mills. "It only requires that "it be placed 

before the people in a proper manner." 
Arrangement of Paint Section 

The paint display of the Mills Hard- 
ware Company is arranged on shelves, 
the various sizes and colors and classi- 
fications being in sections. Paddles show- 
ing the various colors are suspended 
from the ceiling in front of the shelves. 
With ample aisle space it is an easy mat- 
ter for the customer to get in around and 
look over the display. 

Brushes are kept in compartments on 
the display counters and in compart- 
ments which open to the front from un- 
derneath the counter. The upper reaches 
of the paint display are of course reached 
by the sliding store ladder. 

Handy Display of Screen Doors 

The Mills Hardware Company has con- 
ceived a very advantageous way of dis- 
playing screen doors. They have four dif- 
ferent styles which are fastened together 
at the sides with screws. Four castors 
are attached to the bottom, one at each 
corner. This permits the doors to be 
shifted around on the floor and an easy 
inspection by the customer. The prices 
of the various doors are marked in plain 
figures on tickets which are attached to 
each door. Screen windows are placed in 
a section in close proximity to the doors, 
arranged in piles, each pile of which has 
the price plainly marked thereon. Scales 
is another line which is kept prominent- 
ly displayed as a household line in this 
rear section of the store. 

Rear Section Well Lighted 

The rear of the store is well lighted, a 
row of windows high up toward the ceil- 
ing providing for this fe^iture. Shinriin"- 
room is at the rear of the ground floir. 
Here such articles as step ladders are 
tagged and made ready for shipment 
after the sale has been made. Speaking 
of step ladders, this concern sold thirty- 
one in one day as a result of an adver- 
tisement and a window display which ap- 
peared on the day previous to the sale. ' 

Windows a Big Factor 

The Mills Hardware Company lays 
great stress on the value of window dis- 
plays to get business. Mr. Mills stated 
that they had taken the trouble to make 
a count of the people who passed their 
store during the course of a day between 
the hours of 8 a.m. and 10 p.m. The task 
was quite an arduous one and required 
two men at the work most of the time, 
each of the men confining bis count to 
people going in the same direction. When 
the count was made in October, 1916, it 
was found that 48,930 people passed the 
store in the length of time specified. Four 
years -previously when count was made 
the number was found to be only 16,000. 
Mr. Mills estimated that at the present 
time on a Saturday there would be fully 
55,000 people pass their store. This is 
pract'cally one-half the number of the 




Above Illustrations Shows the Method 
Adopted by Mills Hardware Company, 
Hamilton, to Display Screen Doors. Four 
Doors were Screwed Together at Edges 
and Casters Placed Underneath to Permit 
Being Moved Around the Floor. 

population of the city. With these figures 
in view this company has had good reas- 
on to lay particular stress on their win- 
dow displays. Mr. Mills lays stress on 
the value of location to get trade. 

Display of Housecleaning Lines 

On the occasion of the visit of HARD- 



WARE AND METAL'S representative to 
the store one of the window displays 
comprised housecleaning lines such as 
brushes, brooms, cotton gloves, mops, 
window washers, wall finish, carpet beat- 
ers, step ladders, floor wax. The window 
was tastefully arranged without show- 
ing any tendency to crowding. Goods 
such as mops, carpet beaters, window 
cleaners were on panels in the rear of 
the window. 

The opposite window was devoted 
largely as a production window. A win- 
dow card was placed directly under a 
draped Union Jack and read: "Plant a 
Victory Garden." Seed packets were^ 
placed on the rear panels. Some porch 
fence gave the impression of a garden. 
Boxes of seed were placed on the fioor 
of the window. On the lefthand side 
was a neat bundle of spading forks, a 
hoe and rake and other garden utensils. 
In the rear in the centre of the window 
was a wheelbarrow and immediately in 
front of the barrow was a children's 
wagon. The windows were the object of 
almost constant attention by passers-by. 
Office on Mezzanine Floor 

When the alterations were recently 
made provision was made for the ofiice 
at the rear of the store on a mezzanine 
floor, which overlooked the store. 
Equipment of the office is complete with 
desks, telephones, filing cabinets, vault, 
safe, water tap. On the second floor at 
the rear is the receiving room for goods 
shipped to the store. Goods are carried 
to this room by freight elevator in the 
rear. On this floor also is the advertis- 
ing department. This is a small room 
set aside for the advertising manager. 
Here all showcards are drafted, cuts are 
filed in cabinets and records kept of 
same. All material pertaining to the ad- 
vertising department of the store are 
kept in this section. This is perhans 
something distinct for a retail store. The 
large department stores have their ad- 
vertising departments but it is some- 
what rare for the smaller retail store to 




View Showing Wide Swinging Platform in Part of Warehouse of Mills Hardivare, 
Hamilton, Designed to Utilize Storage Space for Lines on Which the Season Has 

Passed. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



n9 




View Showing Section of Store of Mills H ardware, Hamilton, Given Over to Paint Department and Household Lines. Note 
the Arrangement of Stock on Tables and on Shelves. This is a New Section Recent ly Added to the Store of This Firm. 



recognize the value of having this work 
in a department by itself. 

Wareroom on Second Floor 

To the front of the receiving room is 
the wareroom for the storage of goods 
not on display. One of the features of 
this room is a large swinging shelf on 
"which goods are stored that will be in 
small demand for some time in the 
future. For instance, coal shovels, snow 
shovels, ash sifters and similar lines find 
lodgment there until they are in demand 
again in the fall. There is ample room 
for storage space in this new section and 
additional room is obtained by reason of 
the fact that there are no pillars or 
girders in the section. Here the surplus 
screen doors and windows, brushes, and 
similar lines are kept. 

Basement for Enamelware Display 

Immediately at the foot of the stair- 
way leading from the main floor to the 
basement is a section which is devoted as 
a salesroom for tinware and enamelware. 
The goods are displayed on tables and on 
shelves around the walls. The entrance 
way to the basement is in the centre of 
the larffe L section. While this may 
seem a little out of the customer's path, 
still the manaeement anticipates that it 
will be a popular department. The sec- 
tion is nicelv lighted and is in a some- 
what secluded section. Near the foot of 
the basement stairs to the left is the 
sheet glass department. The cutting 
"board, which is one of the latest models 
of a leading manufacturer, is supplied 
with a brilliant light immediately over 
it. The glass is stored in wall cases in 
close nroximity to the cutting board, 
there being a section for each of the 



various standard sizes of glass. Surplus 
wallboard is carried on shelving. Extra 
pipe is stored on racks built for that pur- 
pose. 

Showcases for Silver Hollow ware 
One of the additions made to the store 
when the recent alterations were made 
was that of wall showcases for silver 
hollowware and flatware. This display is 
now arranged in a permanent location on 
the right-hand side of the store. Being 
on shelves behind glass sliding doors it 
is kept free from dust. It furthermore 
gives a touch of richness to the store in- 
terior. The silver flatware display is ar- 
ranged on a panel and kept under glass. 
Silent salesmen in the front part of the 
store show attractive displays of elec- 
trical lines such as toasters, irons, sock- 
ets, flatware. 

Newspaper Advertising Is Aggressive 

The newsnaner advertising of the Mills 
Hardware Companv is a fine example of 
ao'gressive and well-directed effort along,' 
this line. Their advertisements are well 
illustrated and tell the customer enough 
details about the line to let the salient 
facts be known. Reproductions of some of 
these advertisements appear herewith. 
The Mills ComDany has two stores in 
Hamilton, one being located on King 
street and the other on Barton street. 
The Barton street store has a wider 
frontage than the one on King street, the 
latter store being described in the above 
article. 



St. Thomas, Ont. — Jackson & Firth, of 
St. Thomas, have dissolved partnership. 
The business is being continued by W. 
B. Jackson. 



Developed Good 

Trade in Canned Heat 

Do you sell canned heat? 

Here is a simple story of how a west- 
ern Canadian hardwareman has devel- 
oped a splendid sale for just exactly 
that — canned heat. Alfred Babb, Port- 
age La Prairie, Man., tells it. 

In the first place this "heat" is done 
up in a small can about the size of that 
of a hand-cleaner and is sold in a car- 
ton with a small fixture to fit it in. 

"A man came in here one day," ex- 
plained Mr. Babb to HARDWARE AND 
METAL, "and asked if I had any canned 
heat. 'Sure,' I said, 'anything you want.' 

"I thought of course he was trying to 
spring something on me and I was not 
going to be caught. 

"He asked me to let him see it as he 
had tried to buy it at a drug store and 
couldn't. The druggist had sent him to 
me. Then I noticed he was serious. He 
explained what it was and how he had 
been buying it in a drug store in the 
place where he came from down in the 
States. 

"After making some enquiries I found 
it and put in a stock. My first customer 
pointed how it could be used to heat 
the baby's milk in "a hurry, make the 
midnight cup of cocoa, heat the water 
at the picnic party, on camping trip, etc. 

"By using this information after we 
got in a shipment we soon developed an 
attractive trade for "canned heat" which 
is still with us." 

All that is necessary is to take off 
the cover and hold a lighted match over 
the contents of the can. A gas forms 
which immediately ignites and throws 
off a substantial heat. 



40 



July 6, 1918 



Canvas and Circulars Increase Trade 

Toronto Hardware Firm Makes Good Loss Occasioned by Light Building Operations 
Through Personal Canvas in District — Send Circulars Out in Interests 

of Auto Accessory Department 



Interior store signs have 
been made a prominent fea- 
ture in business-getting of 
George Stirrett ^ Son. 
These signs are changed 
frequently the same as win- 
dow displays should be 
changed. They make an ap- 
peal because they tell some- 
thing new from time to time. 



THE falling off in building opera- 
tions since the commencement of 
the war was the means of starting 
George Stirrett & Son, Dundas street, 
Toronto, in quest of trade along other 
lines. In consequence they have develop- 
ed the idea of a personal canvas among 
the manufacturers of their district and 
have found that their trade from this 
source has more than counterbalanced 
the diminution in the builders' hardware. 
Furthermore the net profit from the fac- 
tory trade has been greater than that 
from the building trade. In the instance 
of the building trade this concern asserts 
they had during an average year in the 
neighborhood of one hundred and twenty- 
five accounts. From this number of 
builders the bad accounts would run as 
high as $300 in some years. There was 
a large percentage of losses in this re- 
soect because some of the builders would 
either fail or move away without paying 
their bills, or were just natural dead- 
beats. "In the development of trade 
with the factories we have found this ele- 
ment of loss to be almost entirely elim- 
inated," said Melvin Z. Stirrett, of 
George Stirrett & Son, to HARDWARE 
AND METAL. "During the three years 
that we have been catering to the factory 
trade the only losses we have incurred 
through being unable to collect our ac- 
counts amounted to $8 in one instance 
and $13 in another instance. This is a 
pretty fair indication of the collectability 
of our accounts. Our trade too has in- 




Store of George Stirret & Son, Dundas 
Street, Toronto. 

creased in this department very materi- 
ally. We carry a fairly heavy stock of 
machine bolts, carriage bolts, stove bolts, 
coach screws, machine screws, wood 
screws, electric goods, cap screws, set 
screws, cotter pins, straight shank drills, 
taper shank drills, blacksmiths' drills, 
machinists' tools, hack saw blades, pliers, 
snips, files and fire extinguishers." 

Sets Aside Three Days Each Week 

George Stirrett & Son make regular 
calls on three days each week to cover 
the factory trade. That their trade has 
shown development is indicated from the 
fact that last year their business showed 
an increase by 50 per cent, over any pre- 
vious year. Part of this of course is 
made up through the higher prices pre- 
vailing for commodities of various kinds. 

Prompt Delivery a Feature 

One of the features of their business 
which has greatly assisted in the de- 
velopment of trade is the matter of de- 
livery. This concern is located on Dun- 
das street, a few blocks east of the manu- 
facturing district along the lines of the 
C. P. R. and G. T. R. in West Toronto. 
They are in close proximity to the manu- 
facturers and are in a position to give 
prompt delivery. A motor truck is oper- 
ated uring the summer months, but de- 
livery is made through some of the regu- 
lar cartage companies of the district dur- 
ing the winter months. It has been 
found by this firm that it pays to hire 



Aggressive hardware mer- 
chants do not quit going 
after trade in other lines be- 
cause one department may 
happen to have a slump. 
Following story tells how a 
personal canvass increased 
trade in one department to 
offset loss through declining 
building operations. 



their delivery during the winter months, 
when there is great difficulty in getting 
around with a motor truck. Another 
feature that greatly facilitates the 
prompt delivery of goods is to have a 
telephone line which is used exclusively 
for this factory trade. There is the re- 
gular store telephone line and the line 
for the factory trade. When an order is 
received it is started on the way to the 
customer's as soon thereafter as possible. 
The manufacturers have shown their ap- 
preciation of prompt service which per- 
haps accounts for the increase in the 
trade more than any other factor. 

Auto Accessories a Good Line 

George Stirrett & Son are finding that 
the auto accessory lines are good ones to 
handle. They get after this trade by find- 
ing out the names of car owners of the 
district through the provincial register. 
They keep in touch with them through 
the issuance of circulars, which at times 
take the form of handbills and at times 
the form of letter circulars. A display is 
kept in the window from time to time, 
which catches the eye of passing auto- 
mobilists. The number of people living in 
the district who keep their own cars for 
pleasure purposes alone is not large. But 
there are a number of business men 
along Dundas street and other streets in 
the district who are good prospective 
purchasers. 

A gasoline service station is kept for 
the convenience of car owners. Mr. Stir- 



July y, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



4i 



rett asserts that in his judgment the 
handling of gasoline does not in itself 
pay for the time and trouble. But it is a 
good feeder for sales of lubricating oils, 
in which commodities there are good pro- 
fits. He is of the opinion that with sales 
of gasoline amounting to five hundred 
gallons or more per day it could be 
handled at a profit, ^/ith sue a volume 
of trade it would pay to let one man de- 
vote his entire time to that work. 

As gasoline brings trade for lubricat- 
ing oil so does its sale help develop the 
auto accessory trade. Car owners who 
come to the store for gasoline will often 
remember that they are in need of some 
article for their car. George Stirrett, the 
senior member of the firm, lives in one 
of the residential districts farther to the 
west. He has seized the occasion to do 
some missionary work among his neigh- 
bors and friends in that district. He also 
has circulars distributed in that district 
calling attention to their auto accessory 
lines. 



Circulars and Letters Sent Out 

This firm makes it a point to send cir- 
culars throughout their district to a list 
of selected names. One of these circulars 
drew attention to the need for greater 
production. "If you can't use a rifle, use 
a spade. Help feed the country. A great 
opportunity to get busy in the back yard 
gardens." Then follows a list of the 
various articles such as spades and 
shovels, poultry netting, garden trowels, 
fertilizers, garden rakes, canvas gloves, 
lawn border, flower and vegetable seeds, 
hammers, step ladders, clover seed. These 
various items are illustrated with small 
electros which the firm secured through 
HARDWARE AND METAL'S electro 
service. The stock of cuts for this pur- 
pose is quite complete. They add greatly 
to the attractiveness of the circulars. It 
is needless to say that a description of 
each article is given, together with the 
prices at which they are sold. Twice each 
year a letter circular is sent out to cus- 
tomers and prospective customers in the 



district. Following is a copy of one of 
the circulars issued by this firm: 
"Dear Sir: 

"We take this opportunity of 
thanking you for the business that 
you have given us for the year just 
past. We hope that we gave you en- 
tire satisfaction with each purchase, 
which was our aim. For the coming 
year we hope that we will be able to 
get more of your patronage. We 
have added to our stock during the 
year dozens of new lines for which 
there is a demand. Our aim is to 
keep in stock the goods the people 
ask for. 

"The household trade is our spec- 
ialty, we want the women folk to 
come up to our store and get oi^r 
prices on graniteware, tinware, al- 
uminum, and dishes, because we keep 
our prices down to rock bottom. 

"We might also mention that we 
are doing plumbing, tinsmithing, gas 
(Continued on page 44.) 



Current Events in Photograph —No. 27 




UNCLE SAM'S 
SAILORS 

The flag pictured 
herewith is the liv- 
ing emblem of 
America's entry in- 
to the war. The flag 
is composed of men 
newly enlisted in 
the American Navy. 
Standing there are 
22,000 enlisted men 
on the Great Lakes 
Navy R e c r u iting 
Grounds at Chi- 
cago. These are 
fresh water boys 
going to try conclu- 
sions with the Kais- 
er's ''U" boats. 



42 



July 6, 191* 



Made Flashlights a Real Selling Line 

By Simple Transformation in Window Display Salesman in Alberta Caused Window 
to Increase Sales 1250 Per Cent. — Fine Illustration of Possibilities in Elec- 
trical Lines — One of Answers Submitted in Salesmen's Contest 




View Showing Fine and Effective Display o/ Electric Irons Recently Shown in One of the Large Toronto Electrical Stores. 
An old-fashioned stove is placed in the Ri h.t Side of the Window and the Innumerable Steps Taken in Walking Between 
Stove and Ironing Board Was Represented by White Chalk Footprints on the floor. Note the Appeal Made Through the 

Window Cards. 



^T^ HAT such a line as electrical 

^ goods can be made real live 
sellers is illustrated by the follow- 
ing story which was submitted 
in the contest for salesmen re- 
cently conducted by Hardware 
AND Metal. From a window 
that had only sold $4 worth of 
flashlights and batteries in three 
weeks it was transformed into 
one that sold $50 worth in two 
weeks. And this in a small town 
of slightly more than 1,000 popu- 
lation. Here is the experience of 
George F. Snoad, salesman with 
the Blairmore Hardware Com- 
pany of Blairmore, Alta. 



I 



PRESUME that it would be cor- 
rect to style it silent salesmanship 
as it was the result of a window 
display. I must say that I firmly be- 
lieve the silent salesman is a real genu- 
ine winner, providing- the goods for sale 
are attractively and tactfully arranged, 
and truthfully explained. For instance 
we had a window display of a varied 
assortment of flash lamps and batteries, 
and although the goods had been on ex- 
hibition for three weeks the sales were 
practically nil. The articles in question 
were displayed in very ordinary fashion, 
without price cards. 

"After removing these goods I gave 
the glass a good cleansing inside and 
out and re-transferred the same flash 
lamps and batteries into the same win- 
dow, arranging each article in a con- 
spicuous manner with the addition of 
plain but well written price tickets, ex- 
plaining the detailed merits, and uses to 



which flash lamps could be put. The 
result was that within a week we were- 
mailing a doubled repeat order for the- 
above lines, whereas we possibly would 
have shelved the old stock for' six: 
months. 

"The goods in question were sold at 
regular prices, and although this is a. 
very small town our sales for fourteen- 
days exceeded $50, whereas before the 
transformation of the display three 
weeks' sales only yielded $4. 

"I'm quite confident that if a window 
display is to be productive of increased 
business, when the articles are offered at 
normal prices, the following must be 
strictly adhered to. 

"Display window glass must be well 
cleansed and polished. 

"The frame of the glass should be 
suitably painted. 

"By all means furnish a suitable base 
and background, arranging for color of 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



43 



same to blend as accurately as possible 
with the contents of window. 

"Never omit to have as many price 
tickets as possible without causing con- 
:fu9ion in their arrangement. 

"Be sure the tickets are attractively 
and well written. 

"And by all means BE BRIEF. I'm 
positive price tickets create sales. 

"Very many people refrain from pur- 
chasing a certain article that ihe\' may 



atop to inspect in a store window for 
the simple reason that it bears no price. 
And it is very objectionable for a goo i 
vca.ioiity of people to enter a s^ort just 
to enquire how much such an article is." 
It wili be seen from the relation of 
the above experience that it is possible 
to turn a non-producing window into a 
real selling force. No better demonstra- 
tion of the selling power of the window 



could be had as applied to electrical 
lines. What was here done with flash- 
lights and batteries would apply with 
equal pertinency to other electrical lines. 
By an increase in sales from $4 in three 
weeks to $50 in two weeks the percent- 
age of increase in that time amounted 
to 1250 per cent. And Blairmore is a 
town of slightly less than one thousand 
population. 



Prize Winning Sales Methods 

Howard Crummer, of Cowan Hardware Co., London, Ont., Increased Sale of Stoves 

From 25 Per Year to Over 200, and Won First Prize— W. E. Cassidy, With 

Robert Home Hardware at Sudbury, Ont., Sold Over 70 Oil 

Stoves Last Year and Won Second Prize 



Sold Over 200 Oil 

Stoves in One Year 



**rr\ 



HE selling of coal oil stoves, lo 
my v.'ay of thinking, is one lint 
that the average hardware man 
falls down on," stated Howard Crummer 
In giving his selling experience. "Our 
store was the same as the rest. When 
summer comes around Mr. Hardware 
Man puts a coal oil stove on display and 
waits for a customer to come and buy it. 
Healizing this and knowing the vast field 
for these. I decided we could sell mure 
coal oil stoves. 

"I asked and obtained a free hand in 
regard to the selling of the above. 

"To begin, I arranged with the manu- 
facturer to have our staff of clerks visit 
the ftictory and see coal oil stoves manu- 
factured, also to receive a lecture from 
the sales manager explainino' the differ- 
ent p-^rts and features of the stoves. 
This has been of much benefit to us, as 
the clerks know what they are talking , 
about and can dwell on t^-e good poinds.' 

"Secondly, I arranged a demon^-trution 
week. Obtained a lady who could cook 
well and had her demonstrate in the 
store window. During that week I ad- 
vertised coal oil stoves in our local pa- 
pers and invited the public to come in 
and see cooking done on a coal oil stove, 
also to partake of a cup of coffee and 
cake. 

"They sure did come in. Whether it 
"was for the coffee and cakes or tlie 
demonstration, I don't know which, but 
we sold more stoves in that one week 
than we sold the whole year previous. 

"Thirdly, I keep one stove lighted with 
a tea kettle of water steaming on it ail 
the summer weather, in the most con- 
spicuous place of the store. I find that 
this is one of the best ads. we can get. 
The amount of oil consumed is small 
and the attention it commands is simply 
wonf'erful. 

"Fourthlv. We have front and back 
■windows in ou^ ^tore. the latter facing 
the market, and I ke°n a display of coal 
oil stoves in either of these the summ.er 
throuerh. 

"Fifthly. Likewise, I see they are ad- 
-vertised regularly in our local papers, 



LAST week Hardware and 
Metal announced the win- 
ners in the salesmen's contest, 
the first prize being awarded to 
Howard Crummer, of the Cowan 
Hardware Company, London, 
Ont., and second prize to W . E. 
Cassidy, of the Robert Home 
Hardware, Sudbury, Ont. It was 
somewhat oj a coincidence that 
both the winners related their 
experiences in connection with 
selling oil stoves. Methods which 
they have used might well be 
emulated by other salesmen 
throughout the country with 
profit to themselves and the 
concerns by which they are em- 
ployed. Hardware merchants 
themselves will find food for 
thought in the sales methods here 
described. 



using an electro always in doing so, 
which helps to draw attention. 

"In years previous to this, we sola, 
on an average, abciut tA'enty-five stoves 
per year. Last year we sold over two 
hundred and this year we expect to sell 
many more. 

"I attribute to the above methods the 
wonderful increase in the sale in our 
store of the coal oil stoves, which to- 
day form one of our best paying lines. 

Sold 70 Oil Stoves 

"Sudbury has a population of about 
7,500, with six hardwares, all selling oil 
stoves," stated W. E. Cassidy of the 
Robert Home Hardware, Sudbury, Ont., 
in giving his experience as an entrant 
in hardware AND METAL'S contest 
for salesmen. 

"Last year we sold over seventy oil 
stoves, and expect to reach the 100 mark 



this year, having disposed of over thirty 
to date, with several prospects in view. 
Each oil stove that is sold means a new 
customer for oil and oil stove acces- 
sories. From six to seven gallons of oil 
per month will last a family of five with 
an oil stove. This averages about fifty 
gallons per season. 

"After having succeeded in making a 
sale of an oil stove, I endeavored to sell 
my customer the accessories such as 
ovens, oil stove wash boilers, tea kettles, 
toastei's, and special oil stove oil cans, 
all of which I keep well displayed on the 
sample stoves. 

Five stoves of various sizes with and 
v.'ithout cabinets and ovens are displayed 
near the main entrance of the store 
The ovens contain self-basting roasters, 
pie plates and bread pans to fit oven. A 
record of each oil stove sale is kept in 
a book for the purpose, the date, name 
of purchaser, address and employment 
pre registered along with the size of the 
stove and accessories purchased. 

Alv/ays Tries to Interest Customers 

"After I am through serving my cus- 
tomers I always attempt to interest 
them in an oil stove. After lighting it 
I draw my prospect's attention to the 
cabinets and different ovens on other 
stoves until the stove I stalled has gen- 
erated sufficient heat to make an impres- 
sion upon my customer of its actual 
performance. A small tea-kettle is plac- 
ed over the burner and allowed to boil, 
which takes about four or five minutes. 

"The flams is then extinguished and 
a lighted match held above the top of 
the burner. This ignites the vapor 
which formerly was generated by the 
heat in the combustion chambers. This 
proves that the oil is vaporized into a 
gas before being consumed, therefore 
eliminating the offensive odor. This 
vapor or gas is produced in the perfor- 
ated combustion cylinders which produce 
an inflammable gas through the correct 
proportions of air and kerosene. 

Demonstrates Simplicity of Wicks 

"The next step is to demonstrate to 
my customer the simplicity of replacing 
the wicks, also the cleaning of the wicks 
and burners. After having made the 



44 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



sale I now proceed to advise my cus- 
tomer on how to prolong the life of the 
stove by placing the combustion cham- 
bers in a kettle with boiling water. This 
removes the carbon and soot which clogs 
up the perforations in the cylinders and 
causes the stove to smoke. 

"It is advisable always to keep the 
stove away from a coal or wood stove 
while in use or near a hot radiator. 
Every oil-burning device is subject to 
capillary attraction. That is, heat pro- 
duced with a wick or kindler will at- 
tract oil towards that which produces 
the heat. Therefore if you place an oil 
stove near a hot range the heat of the 
range will cause the oil tank under the 
large one to overflow. To avoid this 
keep the oil stove in a cool part of the 
kitchen. 

Saving in Cocking Meats 

"The average salesman is not aware 
that meats cooked in an oil stove oven 
or an electric oven have less shrinkage 
per pound than meat cooked in any cool 
stove oven, the saving in a nine-pound 
leg of mutton being as much as l^/^ 
pounds, as compared with cooking the 
same amount in a coal range. 

"A number of careful and indepen- 
dent experiments in England have shown 
that there is a shrinkage of from 25 
to 35 per cent, in the weight of meat 
cooked by coal or wood. Whereas the 
same amount of meat cooked to the same 
degree of heat in an oil stove oven loses 
only 10 or 15 per cent, of its original 
weight, which would be equivalent to a 
financial saving of thirty cents or the 
price of a gallon of kerosene on a roast 
weighing 5 pounds 14 ounces. 

Advertising and Displaying 

"I always arrange to keep an oil stove 
in the front section of the store during 
the winter as we find a good demand 
from the apartment houses and suites 
which are steam-heated. During the 
summer months a window display which 
is changed frequently is devoted exclu- 
sively to oil stoves and electrical appli- 
ances. 

"Every Saturday night an oil stove is 
kept burning with a kettle full of water 
on it. The steam from this kettle at- 
tracts the attention of the public, many 
of them asking an explanation. Large 
cards are arranged along with the stoves 
giving the prices and sizes. In the cen- 
tre of the window a stove is dismantled, 
showing the construction of the burners 
and cylinders. We advertise in the two 
leading papers. The ads. are changed 
every three weeks, one featuring oil 
stoves at one time, and the other build- 
ers' hardware, or other advertising mat- 
ter at the same time. 

"By emphasizing a single article or 
brand in each ad. I find it pays far be- 
yond the old style of advertising half 
a dozen different lines and claiming each 
to be the best on the earth. By concen- 
trating upon one special stove your ad. 
will make a deeper impression. The 
average reader remembers one thing 
where he wouldn't a dozen, and he is. 
more likely to call upon you for it if 
it catches his fancy. 



Includes Advertising Circulars 

"At the end of each month when the 
monthly statements are mailed I arrange 
to include a liberal supply of circulars 
and pamphlets which are supplied by 
the manufacturers of oil stoves. We 
have also large attractive signs painted 
in a bright yellow on rock cuts on the 
principal roads into the town. 

■"This spring I received permission 
from the Canadian Fuel Control Board 
to advertise that there being no oil 
shortage they strongly advised using oil 
burning devices to save the nation's coal. 

"Last summer one of the leading bak- 
ing powder companies held a demonstra- 
tion in two of the leading stores. We 
loaned them an oil stove to demonstrate 
with. A large card in several colors 
directed their inquiries to our address. 



CANVAS AND CIRCULARS IN- 
CREASE TRADE 

(Continued from page 41.) 

fitting, repair broken glass and also 
repair leaky roofs. We carry the 
largest paint stock in the west end 
of the city and can fill every require- 
ment in that respect. 

"Hoping to be favored with more 
of your esteemed business for the year, 
We remain. 

Yours truly, 
GEORGE STIRRETT & SON. 

Interior Signs Changed Frequently 

George Stirrett & Son have made it a 
point to have numerous signs in the in- 
terior of their building. This is made a 
part of their advertising methods. These 
signs are painted in red and black, en- 
closed in a frame and covered with glass. 
They are in large measure indestructible 
and being enclosed under glass they do 
not get soiled. The firm has in the neigh- 
borhood of three hundred of these signs 
which they hang in various parts of the 
store. Some are suspended from the ceil- 
ing while others are hung from the side 
shelves. Some of them read as follows: 

"We repair all makes of stoves and 
furnaces." 

"Gas stoves at prices to fit your 
pocket." 

"We aim to please the ladies." 

"We sell quality goods and our prices 
are right." 

"We rent tools. We do not lend them." 

These are but examples of the wording 
on the various signs, of which they have 
some three hundred as already stated. 
They are changed at frequent intervals 
and a new set put up. Those not in use 
are stored away. There would perhaps 
not be more than twelve or fifteen signs 
in view in the store at any one time.. 
When people enter the store and have to 
wait for any reason they will amuse 
themselves by reading the various signs. 
Time passes more quickly because they 
are in a sense entertained by the mes- 
sages which these signs convey. 

Store Windows Widened 

Recently this concern increased their 
window space by the closing of one of 
the two doors which they had in the front 



end of their store. Their place of busi- 
ness was originally two stores, which are 
now connected by an archway in the 
front and centre, as the original dividing 
wall has been left standing. One of the 
doors is situated at the front corner of 
the store, while the other was used as an 
entrance to the second store. The door 
in the second store was closed up and 
utilized as window show space. Oak floors 
have been placed in the windows which 
make an attractive background for the 
various displays placed therein. 

Does Not Loan Tools 

One of the signs which this firm has 
in prominent place reads: "We rent tools. 
We do not lend them." Many hardware 
stores have had to face the problem of 
loaning tools of various kinds. George 
Stirrett & Son have suffered through 
such a practice and now will not accom- 
modate these would-be borrowers unless 
the full purchase price of the tool is ad- 
vanced. When the tool is returned a 
charge of 10c to 15c is made according to 
the length of time it has been in use. It 
has occurred on previous occasions that a 
borrower often secured the loan of a cer- 
tain tool and would move from the dis- 
trict without returning it. When the 
article is covered by a deposit it is im- 
material then whether they return it or 
not. 



RECOVERED TIN USED IN SILK 
MANUFACTURE 

Many people, hearing of the tin short- 
age, and noting the gradually increas- 
ing pile of tins in the ash barrel, have 
wondered to themselves why some use 
could not be made of these. The an- 
swer is that there is, and that the 
recovered tin helps to make that tie 
you wear or that sillc evening gown, 
dear lady. The American Metal Market, 
New York, gives this interesting little 
sidelight on the matter: "One of the 
principal sources of tin in this country, 
'at least, as far as American production 
is concerned, is the tin that can be re- 
covered by detinners from tin plate 
'scrap. Unfortunately, at the present 
time by far the largest percentage of 
this source of supply is devoted to the 
making of tin tetrachloride which con- 
tains about 50 per cent, tin and is used 
by the silk dyers for weighting and pre- 
paring silk. It is probable that at 
least 5,000 tons of metallic tin per year 
is thus lost in the manufacture of what 
must be considered at the present day 
unessential, and in view of the critical 
condition of the tin market it would 
seem wise and proper that the detinners 
be compelled to confine their operations 
to the production of pig tin which can 
"be recovered from tin plate scrap equal- 
ly as well as tin tetrachloride, except 
that tin tetrachloride brings a higher 
price relatively than pig tin. Not only 
is this tin used by the silk dyers in this 
country, but it has been exported to the 
silk dyers in France, which trade, ap- 
parently, from to-day's Journal of Com- 
merce is enjoying exceptional pros- 
perity." 



July 6, 1918 HARDWAREANDMETAL 45 



Have You Dressed Up Your 
Auto Accessory Window ? 

// you have and you think it a good one, why not have a 
photo taken and enter it in Hardware and Metal's contest 
for the best window displays of auto accessories? Four cash 
prizes are offered: 

First Prize— $10. 

Second Prize $5. 

Third Prize — -$3. 

In addition $i will be paid for each window that does not 
get a prize but which is good enough to receive honorable 
mention and which we can reproduce. 

Auto accessories are becoming a big line with the average 
hardware store. They will become still greater as time goes 
by. Many are right now considering the idea of taking on the 
line. 

Those who are already handling these lines should take 
a keen interest in their window displays. It is one of the very 
important points in connection with the selling of these lines. 

Mere is an opportunity for hardware merchants and sales- 
men to show what they are doing in the way of accessory dis- 
plays. Your selling windows will no doubt be improved be- 
cause you make the effort to have them the best you know 
how. 

Photos of windows must be at least 5 inches by 7 inches 
and preferably 8 inches by lO inches, printed on glossy paper, 
as the latter kind of paper is best suited to have cuts made 
therefrom. 

Contest closes July 20 and photo must be mailed not later 
than that date. Winners will be announced in our issue of 
July 27. 

GET INTO THE CONTEST AND SHOW 
YOUR ART AT WINDOW DISPLAY. 



46 



July 6, 191S 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii::i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



TURPENTINE MARKET VERY STRONG 

AS a result of the conditions that have arben in 
the turpentine industry that commodity is now 
in the .'••tronoest position that it has attained since the 
war began. It was one of the remarkable features of 
the commodity price market that turpentine for al- 
most four years of the war held around pre-war 
prices. 

This was accounted for by the fact that during 
the past two years export to European countries has 
been greatly curtailed. Lack of ships was largely re- 
spoasible. Until the present producing season there 
had been a continued good production. 

Until the present year there were no extensive 
facilities for holding the turpentine in store in the 
Southern United States. Some Southern operators 
anticipated a labor shortage in the producing fields 
of the South and a consequent reduction in output. 

There were good stocks of turpentine available at 
low prices and the time seemed opportune to place 
some of those stocks in storage. This was done. Any 
stocks that are now in the South are firmly held. 
There is no loose surplus to keep the price down as it 
did in previous years. 

With the shifting of labor from the producing 
fields of the South to Northern industrial plants a 
shortage has come about. It is estimated production 
this year will not be more than 40 per cent, of normal 
years. 

Operators who hold the stocks of turpentine find 
the conditions favorable to squeeze the price up. Even 
higher prices can be anticipated. 



IRON AND STEEL PRICES HOLD 

PRESIDENT WILSON has approved the agree- 
ment made by the price-fixing committee of the 
War Industries Board with the representatives of the 
iron ore, pig iron and steel interests that the maxi- 
mum prices now prevailing on pig iron shall be 
maintained until September 30. 

A minority of the pig iron producers were 
anxious to have an increase in the price of pig iron 
as an increase in freight rates and other factors that 
entered into the cost of production since last price 
was set seemed to warrant a higher price. 

There was a pronounced sentiment in Washing- 
ton against disturbing the price of pig iron and fin- 
ished steel products, even in the face of the higher 



producing costs. W^hile the Government is interest- 
ed in greater production it is also interested in keep- 
ing prices stable. 

The Government made an urgent call that pro- 
duction in the iron and steel industry should he- 
.-•peeded up, with the result that the entire producing 
trade is now running from 93 to 95 per cent, of capa- 
city. 

The plate mills are turning out shipplates so fast 
that in some in.stances the shipyards have had to call 
a halt on deliveries for lack of storage space. But it 
is the intention to keep running as near capacity as 
possible in order to provide a surplus of plates by the- 
end of the present year. 



CONSERVE THE TIN 

THE War Industries Board of the United States- 
has recently issued a statement giving the results 
of the deliberations with representatives of each im- 
portant trade using tin . There is a shortage of ships 
to carry the tin from the producing points and it is- 
essential that all stocks Ije conserved. 

As a result of these deliberations and with the aid 
of the Bureau of Standards important measures for 
.saving tin have been eft'ected. It is stated that by the- 
elimination of a number of grades of metals used in 
bearings that a saving of 25 per cent, in the amount 
of tin formerly used can be effected. Investigation.s 
are being carried on with a view to eliminating some 
of the grades of solder and thus effecting a further 
saving. Alread}^ the can companies in that country 
have reduced the percentage of tin in their solder to- 
40, thus saving from 8 to 10 per cent. 

Brass and bronze ingots, it is asserted, could stand 
a considerable reduction in tin content without re- 
ducing the efficiency. By a plan to recover the tin 
foil and collapsible tin tubes, it is estimated that some- 
3,000 to 5,000 tons of tin can be saved each year. In 
the United States tin foil and collapsible tuljes are be- 
ing turned in at the nearest Red Cro.ss centre and 
smelters then purchase at market rates. The value- 
of tin from these two sources alone is estimated at be- 
tween $4,000,000 and $5,000,000. 

Tin plate is being eliminated for such uses as 
roofing, store boards and fire doors by common agree- 
ment. Tobacco manufacturers have agreed to use- 
black plate instead of tin plate for tobacco cans and 
a .saving of some 750,000 base boxes will be effected' 
in this one item alone. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



47 



Canadian manufacturers and users of tin could 
greatly assist in the conservation of the tin stocks by 
following the plan which has been arrived at volun- 
tarily in the republic to the south. 



FIRE LOSS A TREMENDOUS WASTE 
T7 KtURES compiled by the New York Journal of 

Co'mmerce show that the tire kisses for Canada 
and the United States for the first five months of the 
present year while not as large as the corresponding 
months last year are considerably heavier than they 
were during the same period in 1916. 

On this North American continent the fire loss 
for the first five months of the year amounted to 
$119,132,035, as compared with $127,108,455 for the 
corresponding months last year and $113,528,920 for 
a similar i:)eriod in 1916. 

The losses for the full year 1917 were consider- 
ably in excess" of those for 1916, when the gross 
amount in the two countries reached $267,273,140 
last year and $231,422,995 in 1916. 

The suggestion is made that the fire loss could 
probahly be very materially reduced if the Govern- 
mental authorities were to pass stringent laws for the 
protection of foodstuffs and munitions and see that 
these laws are strictly enforced. 

A quarter of a billion dollar loss through tire 
alone on this continent is an a.stounding reality to 
face. Especially is it so in these days when all wealth 
should be conserved with the greatest possible parsi- 
mony. 

But while the fire loss is great the loss through 
failure to paint buildings is equally as astounding. 
A noted professor of the University of Minnesota 
w^ho has made a study of paint materials asserts 
that the loss to buildings through failure to paint 
equals the loss by fire. 

Is there a hardwareman who can fail to press with 
the utmost conviction for paint sales in the face of 
these astounding figures? Buildings need to be pre- 
served from the destruction of the elements as well as 
from the more spectacular destroyer — fire. 



TAKE DELIVERIES WITHOUT DELAY 

THE Canadian Railway War Board has recently 
issued a circular advising that the producer, the 
consumer of industrial material, the wholesale distri- 
butor and the average citizen should take delivery of 
the goods they will need next winter at the earliest 
possible date. The Board points out that there will 
be more goods to move next winter and fewer men 
to help. 

That is the time when peak-load traffic coincides 
with snow and ice-storms. Lakes and rivers are again 
ice-bound at that time and the movement of freight 
is all confined to railways. It is pointed out that de- 
livery of much of the goods can be taken now if the 
effort is made to finance at the present time. 



We have beforetime pointed out in these column.'* 
the necessity for the retailer to take delivery of his 
goods at the earliest possible moment. By taking- 
delivery of any goods that he can place in stock 
before the winter conditions come on he will be 
doing himself a good turn and a patriotic duty as 
well. 

Unquestionably thei'e will be a shortage of cars 
this winter, as evidence is already at hand in the inti- 
mation that tank cars for the carrying of oils and 
gasoline and similar products are being withdrawn by 
the United States Government for war purposes. 

The Canadian Railway Board uses the apt illus- 
tration of the squirrel in the preamble to their cir- 
cular: "Summer never fools a squirrel. Ninety-six 
degrees in the shade reminds him of twelve below. 
And he hustles nuts. Nor should summer railway 
conditions and open navigation on the Great Lakes 
and the St. Lawrence fool a Canadian." 



TRADE OPENINGS IN SOUTH AMERICA 

HON. W. J. HANNA, president of the Imperial 
Oil Company, and former food controller for 
Canada, has just returned from a trip to Peru and 
other points on the west coast of South America. Mr. 
Hanna made a trip to that country in the interests of 
the company of which he is now head, as one of its 
subsidiary companies conti^ols extensive oil fields in 
that section. 

Mr. Hanna is enihusia.stic over the possibilities 
for trade in South America, and is of the opinion 
that Canadian manufacturers should not lose the op- 
portunity to get into that field. He pointed out that 
the exports from those countries consist principally 
of mining products, nitrates of soda, sugar, wool, 
sheepskins and hides. These are commodities that 
Canada can import. 

In an interview in Hardware and Metal, 
June 15, with J. D. McEwen, a returned mission- 
ary from Brazil, it was pointed out by him thnt 
large quantities of agricultural machinery, nails, 
wire, hardware, plumbing material, electrical sup- 
plies, and equipment for various public utilities 
would be required. 

The opinion of the Hon. W. J. Hanna confirms 
that which was previously expressed in these columns. 
Canada needs many of the things that the South 
American countries produce. They, in turn, need 
our manufactured commodities. This is a condition 
that is favorable to development of foreign trade. We 
should not let the opportunity slip away. 



THE large new plant of the International Nickel 
Company at Port Colborne started operations on 
July 1. Production at this plant will reach from 20,- 
000,000 to 24,000,000 pounds of refined nickel an- 
nually and about 12,000,000 pounds of copper. This 
will be a nice little drop in Canada's pi'oduction 
bucket. 



48 



July 6, 1918 



EVENTS IN THE TRADE 



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II 



Business Changes 

Big River, Sask. — J. P. Bysron, hard- 
ware and groceries, has sold his business 
to Freidman & Olson. 

Bird View, Sask.— W. G. Thompson, 
hardware merchant, has been succeeded 
by the W. G. Thompson Company, Lim- 
ited. 

Havelock, Ont — Alexander Leeson 
and Ernest Leeson. father and son, have 
purchased the hardware business of Ray 
Phillips. The Messrs. Leeson have re- 
cently been engaged at farming. 



Obituary 

Joseph W. Rayner, for many years a 
travelling salesman for Meakins & Son, 
Limited, brush manufacturers, died at 
his home in Hamilton on June 23. Mr. 
Rayner is survived by a wife and three 
sons, one of the latter, Lieut. G. V. Ray- 
ner, having been in France for some 
time past with the Canadian forces. 

Dr. James Douglas, who was the first 
to separate on a commercial basis the 
precious metals from the copper by the 
electrolytic method of refining, died in 
New York on June 25. At the time of 
his death he was chairman of the board 
of directors of the Phelps-Dodge Cor- 
poration. Dr. Douglas was a Canadian, 
having been born at Quebec City in 
1837. He was well known as a philan- 
thropist and mining engineer. He was 
chancellor of Queen's University at 
Kingston and had given many gifts of 
money to the institution. 



Incorporations 

The Fred Smith Company, Limited, 
have been granted a charter to manu- 
facture, import and deal in pine tree 
products such as turpentine, pine oil, 
resin, pitch, tar and resin oil. The head 
office of the company is to be in Mail 
Building, Toronto. Fred Smith is presi- 
dent and general manager, and S. F. 
Denison is secretary-treasurer. 



Montreal News Notes 

John McKendrick, Montreal manager 
for the Canada Metal Company, has been 
confined to his home through an attack 
of rheumatism. It is hoped that Mr. 
McKendrick will soon be able to resume 
his duties. 

Mr. Shaw, representing the Miller's 
Falls Company, of Miller's Falls, Mass., 
called on the Montreal trade this week. 

J. W. Richardson, buyer for Caverhill, 
Learmont & Co., has returned to his 
desk after taking his holidays. Mr. 



Richardson states that this is a real re- 
juvenator. 

John Irwin, managing director of Mc- 
Arthur-Irwin, Ltd., is spending some 
time at Thousand Island Park this week. 

E. A. Burden is now representing 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., in Nova Scotia. Any 
mail addressed to him at Box 434, Truro, 
N.S., will reach Mr. Burden promptly. 

C. F. Just, recently returned from 
Russia, where he was Canadian commer- 
cial agent at Petrograd, addressed the 
Montreal Board of Trade and other com- 
mercial interests on Wednesday after- 
noon of this week. His topic was that 
of future trade matters with Russia and 
the meeting was of a private nature 
owing to the frankness of the discussion 
arranged for. 

Maurice Wineroope, Eastern Ontario 
representative for Brandram-Henderson, 
Ltd., has joined the colors. Mr. 
Wineroope is well known to the trade 
over this territory which he has covered 
for the past five years and will be much 
missed by the trade. Frank Boucher, 
late of the Imperial Oil Co., will assume 
the position thus vacated. 



Death of Official of 

Canadian Explosives 

Death came suddenly to William Kelly, 
assistant to the president of Canadian 
Explosives, Ltd., who was suddenly taken 
ill on leaving the company's offices on 
Friday evening last. He became ill while 
he was waiting for his car, and on his 
arrival home three doctors were called 
in. All that was possible was done, but 
within less than three hours the vital 
spark had fled. Mr. Kelly was in his 
fiftieth year and was the youngest son 
of Dr. A. Lawson Kelly, one of the best 
known medical men in Glasgow during 
his practice there. Seven years ago he 
came to Montreal from Nobels, Ltd., of 
Scotland. Very recently he had visited 
Great Britain in connection with business 
contracts. His residence in Montreal 
enabled him to make a large circle of 
acquaintance and he enjoyed the confi- 
dence of a wide business connection. A 
widow and two children survive. 



Burglary Made 

Easy in Saskatoon 

The hardware store of Campbell & 
Cooper of Saskatoon was entered by 
burglars and a quantity of rifles, re- 
volvers and ammunition stolen. The 
burglary evidently took place some tim.e 



following the recent hailstorm in that 
city which broke innumerable windows 
to pieces. It is presumed the burglars 
finding the glass in the door smashed by 
the hail put their arms through and re- 
leased the lock from the inside and gain- 
ed easy entrance. The revolvers stolen 
were ones that had been put away at 
the request of th<? police and were not 
on display. 



Personal 

Charles H. Bass, of the Bissell Car- 
pet Sweeper Company of Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., was a recent visitor in To- 
ronto, calling on the wholesale trade. 

W. J. Lind, of the Independent Cordage 
Company, is on a business trip to the 
Maritime Provinces. He will spend a 
week or ten days in that section. 



Hailstorm Was 

Good for Glass Trade 

"It is even an ill hailstorm that blows 
no good." The recent hailstorm in Sas- 
katoon was one of the worst to visit 
that city in recent years and smashed 
window glass and street lights and 
stripped vegetation. As a result the 
hardware stores did a fine business in 
supplying window glass to replace that 
which was destroyed. Fortunately there 
was apparently sufficient glass in the 
city to meet the requirements. The Sas- 
katoon Hardware Company, J. H. Ash- 
down Hardware Company, Isbister & 
Pretty. Fawcett Hardware Company and 
C. E. Houlding remained open Wednes- 
day afternoon during the week of the 
storm in order to pass the glass out. 
It had been the custom to close on Wed- 
nesday afternoon each week. 



Cycle Trade in 

Hardwareman's Hands 

A. Y. Douga.;? of the Vancouver 
branch of the Canada Cycle & Motor 
Company, Limited, is authority for the 
statement that outside a few of the large 
cities and towns of the province where 
exclusive cycle stores can be supported, 
the bicycle trade is practically in the 
hands of the hardware merchant. Several 
instances are on record in the province 
where hardware stores started to handle 
bicycles about two years ago with a stock 
of perhaps one or two bicycles and now 
have separate departments devoted soie- 
Iv to the bicycle and its accessories. In 
British Columbia there are upwards of 
forty hardware dealers holding agencies, 
for the various makes of bicycles. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



49 



Pig Iron and Steel 

Prices Hold Unchanged 

The price conference at Washington 
recently confirmed the existing price on 
pig iron and finished products for a pe- 
riod of three months from July 1. The 
price of Lake Superior iron ore was in- 
creased 45c per ton, largely due to 
the general increase in freight rates. 
This extra charge will be absorbed by 
the producers of ore, so that the cost 
of the finished pig iron will not be 
affected thereby. Pig iron producers will 
therefore not be affected in the way 
that it was first anticipated they would 
be. 



Canadian Manufacturer Joins Engineers 



Reviv^al of Custom of 

Annual Bicycle Picnic 

The bicycle trade was well represenL- 
ed at Grimsby Beach on Saturday, Jure 
22, when a boat excursion to this point 
and a picnic was held under the aus- 
pices of the Canada Cycle & Mot^^r Com- 
pany, Limited, Weston, Ont. This even*; 
wns tne revival of an old custom in the 
Canadian bicycle industry to held an 
onnual outine:, the last excai'S'on hav- 
ing been held to Rose Bank in 1902. 
Following the general success of the re- 
cent picnic, announcement was mad;? that 
the event would again become an an- 
nual fixture for the industry. 



Presents Four 

Cows to Red Cross 

p. M. Sharpies, president of the Shar- 
pies Separator Company, has presented 
four pure-bred dairy cows to the Ameri- 
can Red Cross Society. There is one 
each of the Jerseys, Guernseys, Hoi- 
steins, and Ayrshires. He proposed as 
a means for raising funds for the so- 
ciety that the cows should be sent on a 
tour and featured in each city visited 
during a Red Cross Dairy Day and sold 
at public auction to the people of each 
city. Every bid would be accepted — all 
money so bid and subscribed to go to 
the Red Cross through the local Red 
Cross organization in charge of the auc- 
tion sale. Every bidder is to be given 
a certificate of temporary ownership 
of the cow of his or her choice and 
would automatically return such cow to 
the Red Cross to be resold again and 
again. When the tour has been com- 
pleted it is proposed that the cows shall 
be finally donated by the people of the 
United States to the Government of 
France as the foundation of four breed- 
ing herds of dairy cattle to assist in 
the re-establishment of the dairy indus- 
try in that country. 



Additional Half 

Holidays Announced 

Mount Forest, Ont. — By-law providing 
for half-holidav Friday afternoon dur- 
ing July and August passed since first 
announcement. 

Markdale, Ont.^Hardware stores do 
not close for half-holiday. Close even- 
ings. 




FRED R. WHITTALL 
Managing Director of the A. R. Whittall Can Company of 
Montreal Who Has Given Up His Commercial Activities for 
Military. 



Fred R. Whittall, 
B.Sc, and managing 
director of the A. R. 
Whittall Can Com- 
pany of Montreal, 
has joined the 0. T. C. 
Canadian Engineers. 
Having received his 
degree from McGill 
University in Civil 
Engineering in 1912, 
Mr. Whittall will be 
qualified for service 
with the Engineers 
Corps, and made his 
connection with them 
early this week. 

As managing direc- 
tor of his company 
Mr. Whittall has seen 
the business develop 
materially, until the 
old premises were 
entirely inadequate 
for the execution of 
orders received, and 
only last winter very 
extensive additions 
were made to the 
plant and new ma- 
chinery installed. 

Outlining his plans 
briefly to a repre- 
sentative of HARD- 
WARE AND METAL 
Mr. Whittall expect- 
ed that he would be 
going overseas in the 
near future. 



Former Iron and 

Steel Man dies 

Charles Cassils, a very widely and 
well known citizen of Montreal, died at 
his home here on Tuesday morning at 
the age of 77 years. 

Mr. Cassils was a capitalist, and for a 
long time one of the prominent business 
men of the city in various undertakings. 
Because of his fine personality and wide 
interests his circle of acquaintance was 
a large one, and his interest in philan- 
thropic enterprise endeared him to 
many. Born in Scotland in 1841 Mr. 
Cassils early in life entered the employ 
of James Watson & Co., iron and steel 
merchants of Glasgow, and was with 
them for many years. His connection 
with the business life of Montreal began 
back in 1868, entering first as a member 
of the wholesale shoe manufacturing 
firm of Cochrane, Cassils & Co. Here 
he remained for twenty years, and then 
launched again into the iron and steel 
business on his own account, represent- 
ing large British interests and later being 
the representative of the Carnegie Steel 
Company until the organization of the 
Steel Trust. Among other organizations 
Mr .Cassils was connected with the St. 
Lawrence Bridge Co. as president, was 
a director of the Dominion Bridge Co., 
and a director of the Northern Electric 



and Manufacturing Co., Ltd. Seven 
children survive and two sons are 
at present engaged in business in 
Montreal. 



Stovemakers Want 

Promise of Supplies 

A deputation representing the various 
stove manufacturers of Canada waited 
on the War Trade Board at Ottawa on 
Wednesday of this week to request that 
eff'orts be made to obtain a sufficient 
supply of pig iron from the United 
States to permit them to carry on busi- 
ness. The board assured the delegation 
that efforts would be made to secure a 
supply so that the industry would not be 
handicapped. Demands of the United 
States Government have been so great 
that commercial users have found it dif- 
ficult to get enough pig iron for their 
requirements. If the Canadian manu- 
facturers are unable to get sufficient sup- 
plies of pig iron the manufacture of 
stoves will have to be greatly curtailed 
for the coming year's business. A re- 
port from Ottawa stated that stoves are 
still being permitted to come into Can- 
ada from the U'iited States, and in this 
respect was working an injustice to the 
Canadian manufacturer when pig iron 
supplies are at such a low ebb. 



50 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



CATALOGUES and 
BOOKLETS 



Catalogue of Electric Appliances 

Landers, Frary & Clark have just is- 
sued a complete catalogue of electric 
appliances which is called "Universal 
Electric Home Needs," and covers the 
complete line of electric appliances made 
by this firm; A copy of the same may 
be had by addressing A. MacFarlane & 
Company, Coristine Building, Montreal, 
Que. 



Hardware Catalogue Is3u?'l 

J. E. Beauchamp & Co., Montreal, has 
issued a catalogue styled "Catalogue A," 
which comprises 144 pages and is full 
of information respecting their various 
lines. One of the features of the cata- 
logue is the division into sections show- 
ing such things as the regular hardware 
lines, automobile supplies, and various 
other lines, a quick index system is used 
in the book which was designed to save 
the merchant's time and place every 
line in the book at his finger tips. The 
various articles are classified under the 
following heads: automobile supply mer- 
chants, canners, carpet merchants, 
crockery and china merchants, drug- 
gists, electric supply merchants, furni- 
ture manufacturers, furniture mer- 
chants, grocers, haberdashers, hardware 
merchants, harness merchants, packers, 
phonograph merchants, saddlerv mer- 
chants, shippers, sporting goods mer- 
chants, toy merchants, wooden box 
manufacturers, woodworkers. The cata- 
logue is well illustrated throughout, the 
cover being of heavy green paper print- 
ed in black. It is for distribution to the 
trade. 



HARDWARE 
LETTER BOX 



Manufacturers Emery Paper 

La Compagnie Martineau, Quebec, 
P.Q. — Do you know where we can secure 
emery paper? 

Baeder & Adamson, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Harmon & Dixon, New York, N.Y. — Ed. 



CHANGE IN FIRM NAME 

The name of the firm of Churton & 
Taylor, Toronto, has been changed to 
that of "The Vivid Electric Lamp Co." 
This in no way changes the personnel of 
the concern, who are proprietors and dis- 
tributors of the "Vivid" lamp. 



Number of Tire 

Types to be Reduced 

A despatch from Washington recently 
stated that the number of types of auto- 
mobile tires will be reduced from 287 to 
32, according to agreement of the tire 
manufacturers acting on the recommen- 
dation of the Conservation Division of 
the War Industries Board. Under the 
programme announced by November 1, 
1920, all but nine types and sizes wiil 
have been discontinued. Elimination of 
so-called non-essential types will be 
gradual. It is asserted that the motor- 
ing public will suff'er no inconvenience, 
as the types will be standardized to meet 
the new conditions. 



BROWNING— GUN MAN FOR THE 
UNITED STATES 

Continued from page 51. 

test he was asked about it. 

"I'm trying to harness the 'kick,'" he 
declared, solely. 

Thev laughed. It was "One of John's 
jokes," they said. 

It Wjis a mighty important joke. Soon 
he had utilized the power of the gas in 
such, a manner that a part of this wasted 
pressure was transferred to the breach 
mechanism and made to operate the gun. 
One pull of the trigger and the re- 
bound of the force fired the weapon a 
second time, this rebound fired it a 
third time, and so on until he soon had 
a gun that, with a single pull at the 
trigger, would fire six hundred bullets 
in less than a minute! 

The outcome of these experiments wa.s 
the automatic firearm. From that the 
famous old Colt's machine gun, at the 
time one of the best in the world. It 
was adopted by the United States army 
and navy more than twenty years ago. 
It was the only machine gun we used 
during the Spanish war. During the 
Boxer uprising in China a detachment of 
our marines with only two of these 
Colts' machine guns — Browning's inven- 
tion—saved the foreign legations from 
destruction and their inmates from but- 
chery. 

In 1914, at the outbreak of this war, 
the only plant in the United States for 
the manufacture of machine guns was 
turning out this weapon, and quantities 
of them were sold to the Allied govern- 
ments. 

When matters began to look as though 
v.'e would get into the fight there came 
a demand from our Ordnance Department 
for machine guns. Experts began in- 
vestigations. The Lewis gun was con- 
ceded to be a "wonder." It did terrible 
execution. But there was one draw- 
back, it was claimed: Even the lightest 
of these Lewis guns could not be fired 
by a single man except under the very 
best of circumstances. And in our pre- 
sent form of warfare there's no such 
thing as any "best of circumstances." 

Meanwhile Mr. Browning continued to 
"putter" about his workshop in Ogden. 
He was working on an improvement of 
the machine gun. 

This Wizard of Firearms has never 
been contented to sit back after one 
big achievement and rest on his laurels. 
Sometimes he takes a bit of a fishing 
trip by way of rest, then back again to 
his shop to try and make still better 
what has just been conceded to be his 
best. 

He knew what was wanted — a rifle as 
light as the average service gun that an 
enlisted man might use as he would an 
ordinary rifle and yet, by a single pres- 
sure of the finger, pour an endless 
stream of bullets irto the enemy. 



A New Machine Gun 

This was out of the question, of 
.lourse. But he did the next best thing 
— he perfected a machine gun that is no 
heavier than the average rifle sportsmen 
use for moose and bear. In fact, a 
lighter rifle than that used by African 
hunters for the biggest game — yet this 
machine gun that he turned out can 
be lifted to the shoulder as any gun 
and forty bullets directed upon the 
enemy in less than two and a half 
seconds — a stream of bullets directed 
as one would direct a garden hose. 

Then he turned out the heavier ma- 
chine gun, a water-cooled affair. 

There was a loud clamor about the 
delay in adopting a machine gun. A 
louder clamor because the Lewis gun 
was not adopted. But all this came 
from men who did not know. 

"It has paid us to wait, because we 
now have the very best machine guns 
in the world," declared Secretary of 
War Baker. 

On the 27th of February history was 
made in connection with machine guns. 
On that date occurred the Government 
tests of the Browning machine guns at 
Congress Heights, a few miles from 
Washington. Three hundred people wit- 
nessed these remarkable tests, including 
British, French, Belgian and Italian 
army officers on duty in Washington. 
There were many Senators and Con- 
gressmen, our own army officers ,and 
probably fifty or more writers for the 
press and magazines. 

"A success!" was the unanimous ver- 
dict after the test. 

The lighter gun was first tried. The 
fifteen-pound arm shoots twenty or forty 
bullets at one time, either from the 
shoulder or the hip. One move of a 
lever cocks the weapon, one pressure of 
the finger discharges it, and the shots 
pour out as fast as one can follow the 
other from the muzzle. It is an air- 
cooled gun and works automatically af- 
ter the first shot, by means of the gas 
pressure. If desirable, the gun may 
be operated to shoot every time the 
trigger is pulled. In general defence, 
however, the soldier would use the for- 
mer method and spray the advancing 
enemy with forty bullets before six 
shots could be fired from the ordinary 
repeating arm. The standard cartridges 
used by our forces in France in the 
Springfield and modified Enfield guns 
are used in this gun. The only tool 
necessary for taking apart the gun is 
the edge of a cartridge. One man 
operates' it quite alone, feeding the clips 
and shooting. 

Arm a body of men with these and a 
hundred could mow down a couple of 
regiments. Or for advance, nothing 
could stand up under them. 

The wicked weapon, however — the wea- 
pon that is doubtless destined to be 
heard from with our troops — is the 
Browning heavy machine gun. This is 
water-cooled and works on a tripod, 
but it weighs only thirty-two pounds. 
In the test 20,000 rounds were fired with- 
out a break or a mal-function of any 
sort. In another test out of 20,000 shots 
there were but three misses, due each 
time to a bad cartridge. In a supreme 
test, 39,000 shots were fired in sucli 
instantaneous succession that the re- 
port sounded like one noise. Then the 
gear gave way. But no such test would 
ever be made in actual warfare, as such 
guns are worked in pairs, one to rest, 
cool, be reloaded and set back in place 
while the other is operating. This gun 
is to be used for aviation service, strip- 
ped of its water-cooler jacket, as the 
air will serve as a cooler. In this shape 
it weighs but twenty-two and a half 
pounds. * 

The details of this test are history. 
They astounded the world. The verdict 
from everyone, everywhere, was: 

"This is the best machine gun made." 



July 6, 1918 

Plllllliiliiiiliiiliillilllllllli^Hllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliilllllllllllllllll^ 



ililllllilll 



51 



THE CLERKS DEPARTMENT 



llllll!! 



BROWNING — "GUN MAN" FOR 

THE UNITED STATES ARMY 

Something About a Little Known Inventor of Death- 
Dealing Marvels Who Became Famous 
Over Night 



THE name of John M. Browning 
has of late been much on the pub- 
lic tongue since the announce- 
ment that the United States War De- 
partment had adopted the Browning 
machine gun in preference to any other 
model on the market. He became fam- 
ous over night, as it were, and how it 
all came about, and what manner of 
man this "gun man" is, is graphically 
told by John Bruce Mitchell in The 
Forum, in answer to the question, 
"Who is Browning?" 

Practically everyone the length and 
breadth of the country was asking this 
question on the morning that the news- 
paperb announced that the Unitad States 
War Department had adopted the 
"Browning machine gun." 

It was a natural questiv.n. Fov, out- 
side of his own townspeophj and those 
who are connected with the manufaf- 
ture of firearms, had ever heard of this 
man. 

"Lewis'' and "Maxim'" are well known 
name.s. When the controveriiy came up 
over the matter of machine guns for 
our new army those names were most 
frequently heard. U was the late Lord 
Kitchener, "K of K,"' v.ho first mado 
practical use of the machine gun in 
warfare. He used the Maxim gun. 
Then the Lewis gun came into existence. 
And when it was finally announced that 
our government was giving an official 
test to a Browning machine gun — and 
later there came the news that we had 
adopted this gun — everyone, it seems, 
was puzzled and asked, "Why not the 
Lewis or the Max-m gun?" 

"Browning? Browning? I'll bet his 
name never appeared on a firearm!" 
one excited retired government official 
declared. 

He was right. Up to the time that 
John M. Browning of Ogden, Utah, per- 
fected this new machine gun his name 
had not appeared on any gun. Yet — 

Every Winchester rifle; every Reming- 
ton shotgun; every Remington automatic 
rifle; every Colt machine gun; every 
Colt automatic pistol (such as our army 
officers carry"); every one of the million 
army pistols manufactured hy a Bel- 
gium concern — every one of these, and 
more, WAS A BRO"WNING GUN! 

An Englishman of title, on a govern- 
ment mission to this country, had oc- 
casion to call on Mr. Browning at his 
home in Ogden. The English official 
howed low. 

"Sir John M. Browning?" he asked. 

"John M. Browning, sir," snapped Mr. 
Browning. The Englishman took the 
hint and called him *TVIister" after that. 



However, the Englishman was correct. 
Mr. Browning has every right to be 
addressed as "Sir," because, early in 
1914, King Albert of Belgium conferred 
upon him the decoration of "Chevalier 
de rOrdre de Leopold." 

It is an attractive decoration — so it is 
said. Mr. Browning has tucked his away 
in some mysterious place and never even 
exhibited it, much less worn it. 

Not one in a thousand, probably not 
one in ten thousand, who has carried 
Winchesters, Remingtons, Colts, Stevens, 
and such familiar firearms into the woods 
during the game season, or used them at 
target practice, coupled the name of 
Browning, when they read about his 
machine gun, with their weapons. But 
despite the fact that various names and 
corporations appear on these guns, the 
man who created them, the man who 
modified and improved and simplified 
them, was this same John M. Browning 

There is no Browning arms plant in 
Ogden. There is a well-equipped shop 
where Mr. Browning "putters around," as 
he himself puts it, but he does not 
manufacture firearms. He doesn't have 
to. He invents them and lets the other 
fellow manufacture them while he banki 
his royalties. 

Some Family History 

Sixty-six years ago, however, there 
was a gunshop in what was then the 
little town of Ogden. It was owned and 
operated by Jonathan Browning, father 
of the inventor of the Browning machine 
gun. The Brownings are Americans 
through and through. In the early for- 
ties Jonathan Browning left his home in 
Tennessee and journeyed to Council 
Bluffs, Iowa, where he plied his trade 
as gunsmith and general "tinker." He 
set up a shop there and made guns for 
the pioneers. He also mended broken 
plows and leaking kettles and did all 
sorts of tinkering. In 1852 he packed 
his shop equipment into an ox cart and 
set out for Ogden. This "equipment" 
consisted of a bag full of tools and an 
ancient wooden foot-power lathe. It 
took him a month to make the trip. 

John M. Browning was born in Ogden 
two years later, and almost from baby- 
hood he played in his father's gun shop. 
Back of this old lathe was a scrap heap, 
such as is found in every shop of this 
kind. It contained old broken and other- 
wise seemingly useless gun barrels, bits 
of flint and percussion cap locks and 
other "junk." This scrap heap and the 
ancient lathe were destined to play a 
big part in the world's history of fire- 
arms. 

When "Jack" Browning was thirteen 
he wanted a gun. The only way to get 
it so far as he could see, was to make 
it' He got busy with that scrap heap 



and before long he had turned out a 
gun that seemed to suit him. His father 
examined it carefully and it is said that 
the old man almost wept with pride and 
joy and told his boy that he had "done 
well." It is also said that this was high 
praise indeed from the sturdy old gun- 
maker, but that secretly, to friends when 
the boy couldn't hear and become "spoil- 
ed" by praise, the old gentleman vowed 
that "Jack has made a better gun than 
I could make." 

The gun that this thirteen-year-old 
boy made worked admirably and the 
Browning larder was kept supplied with 
game. The boy's brothers wanted guns 
like Jack's," so the boy made guns for 
them. 

That same year he astonished his 
father by exhibiting original designs for 
breech mechanism which he had whittled 
out of wood. He worked in between 
school time in his father's gun shop. 
When he was twenty-five he perfected 
a single shot rifle that was soon in great 
demand out there. Orders came thick 
and fact. With his brothers he turned 
out about five hundred of these rifles, 
an improvement over every rifle that 
was known up to that time. 

One of these single shot rifles fell 
into the hands of officials of the Win- 
chester Arms Company, and a man went 
out to Ogden with all speed to find the 
man who made it. They found young 
Browning. 

"Will you show us how it is made?" 
he was asked. 

"Certainly," he responded, and the of- 
ficial was amazed at the manner in 
which they turned out these rifles by 
hand. 

"Is it patented?" 

It certainly was patented. 

"Will you sell us the patent?" 

Young Browning didn't know. He had 
made a good thing out o fit. He was 
working from early until late trying to 
fill orders. It seemed rather poor busi- 
ness to sel la patent that was keeping 
him in all the work he could attend to. 
But the Winchester man named a figure 
that made the young inventor blink. He 
sold his patent, and that design was the 
basis of the first Winchester single-shot 
rifles of all calibres. 

The Automatic 

One day Mr. Browning took a square 
piece of oak, bored a hole exactly the 
size of a .40 calibre bullet in it, placed 
the muzzle of a .40 calibre rifle against 
it so that the bullet would go through 
the hole, and tried an important ex- 
periment. 

He had figured that there was a 
great deal of wasted force in the gas 
caused by the combustion of the powder. 
He wanted to make sure how much force 
there was to this. He took no chances, 
but fastened the rifle against the board, 
attached a cord to the trigger and 
yanked. 

Fortunately, it was a long cord, be- 
cause the force of the gas knocked the 
rifle back half way acros sthe room. 
This was the basis of his automatics, 
the basis of his famous Browning gun 
which is now being turned out wholesale 
and shipped across to France. 

At the time Mr. Browning made his 
(Continued on page 50) 



•uh- S, 191b 



NEW HARDWARE GOODS 

OFFERED TO CANADIAN HARDWAREMEN 



SI! 



AUTO ACCESSORY CABINETS 

The Duluth Show Case Company, Du- 
luth, Minnesota, manufacturers of sec- 
tional hardware store equipment and 
sectional garage equipment, announces 
the addition to their line of three sizes of 
auto accessory or tool cabinets. It is 
claimed these cabinets are especially 
practical for the storage of carburetors, 
magneto and generator parts. It is stated 
the cabinets are extremely practical for 
the storage of small tools that are in 
frequent use. The drawers, in the cabi- 
nets are subdivided into smaller sections 
by means of divisions, which are furnish- 
ed with each cabinet. 




New Autij Accessory Tool Cabinet 



AUTOMOBILE LAMPS 

The Guide Motor Lamp Manufacturing 
Company of Cleveland, Ohio, has re- 
cently placed on the market a new tour- 
ing car top lamp and a new Ford wind- 
shield lamp. The touring car top lamp 
goes under No. 818, and is designed as 
a convenience light that is mounted on 
the centre rib of a touring car top. It is 




Guide Motor Lamp 

claimed for it that folding the top does 
not injure this light, as the shade pro- 
tects the bulb. The wire is carried along 
the rib. Length over all is 3 inches and 
net weight 4 ounces. 

The Ford windshield lamp. No. 802, 
manufactured by the same concern, is a 
miniature light designed for attachment 
to the windshield by two bolts now on 
the windshield frame. They are de- 
signed as signal lights when the car is 
standing, and are operated on two dry 
cells. It is stated the lamps have clear 
semaphore lens, and can be used in pairs 



or on left side only. Outside diameter is 
2 inches and net weight three-quarters 
of a pound. 




Windshield Lamp for Ford Cars 



COMBINATION TIRE CEMENT 

The Williams Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Camden, N.J., is placing on the 
market a new commodity known as 
"S.-V." rubber cement, which is stated 
to be a combination of plugging and 
patching cement in one. It is designed 
to repair pneumatic tires of all kinds. 
It is claimed for it that it is self-vul- 
canizin-.^' and makes a permanent repair. 
The manufacturers assert that with the 
curtailment of the importations of crude 
rubber by the Government it will meai, 
the making of fewer tires, even though 
the demand is increasing, which points 
to a wider market for repair materials. 
The cement is put up in special pointed 
nozzle tubes for ready and efficient ap- 
plication, and it is claimed for it that 
it is light enough for patching and heavy 
enough for plugging. They are packed 
in self-selling counter display cases con- 
taining one dozen tubes. 




"S-V" Rubber Cement 



NEW AUTOMOBILE HEADLIGHT 

C. Kloepfer, Limited, 44-50 Wellington 
street east, Toronto, is placing before the 
Canadian trade the Rite-Lite headlight 
for automobiles which it is claimed is 
scientifically designed to overcome all 
the difficulties experienced in the use of 
powerful electric headlights. The prin- 
ciple used in this headlight is that of 
the camera lens, which it is claimed is 
a new departure in construction. 

In the principle of a camera the view 
of a large landscape is transmitted 
through a small lens of not over one inch 
in diameter and the incoming light is 
evenly distributed over a plate up to ten 



inches square with such evenness that 
no appreciable difference is observed on 
the remotest corners of the plate. In 
Rite-Lite, it is asserted, similar results 
are obtained by the action of the power- 
ful reflectors forcing the light into the 
darkness through a diffusing lens which 
diffuses over an area of at least 100 feet 
in width by five hundred feet in front of 
the car. In order to obtain a longer 
range of light, it is stated, a small bull's- 
eye of clear glass is placed in the diffus- 
ing lens, which causes projected rays 
and intensified light on the road for 
over five hundred feet in front of the 




Rite-Light Headlight 

In Rite-Lite two-thirds of the entire 
lens is made of green and orange shades 
of glass and one-third of white, which 
is the diffusing lens. In action, it is 
claimed, these different shades are blend- 
ed into a soft light which does not cause 
a sharp contraction ■ of the pupil of the 
eye when meeting the car. 



WIRE WHEELS AND PARTS 

The Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., 
Limited, with head offices at Toronto, 
now have control of the distribution of 
the "Houk" and "House" wire wheels 
and parts for Canada. These wheels 
are covered by Canadian patents, which 
are owned and controlled by the Wire 
Wheel Corporation of America. It is 
claimed for these wheels that it has 
been demonstrated beyond doubt that 
there is practically a 20 per cent, greater 
life in a pneumatic tire used on them. 
A set ordinarily comprises five complete 
wheels, with four inner hubs, four hub 
caps, dust cover for spare wheel, one 
hub cap wrench, one nipple wrench. 



July 6, 1918 



WEEKLY HARDWARE MARKET REPORTS 

STATEMENTS FROM BUYING CENTRES 



THE MARKETS AT A GLANCE 

THE tendency in the hardware markets has all been in 
the upward direction so far as prices are concerned. 
There has been quite a number of changes in important 
lines, and indications seem to point to still further advances 
in other lines. 

Lead products are in firm market as a result of the higher 
prices on pig lead in the primary markets. Lead pipe and 
lead waste pipe were lines on which higher prices were 
recorded during the week. Ingot lead was also higher in 
some quarters. 

Ingot tin is a very scarce commodity in Canada at the 
present time, and record prices are prevailing. However, 
a shipment of tin is expected to reach Montreal in the near 
future. Spelter is firmer. Price on pig iron will in all likeli- 
hood hold unchanged in Canada, as it has been decided to 
maintain the price in the United States after a conference 
between the Government authorities and steel and iron 
interests. The price for ingot copper has been advanced to 
26c per pound to producers in United States, which will 
have firming effect on all copper products. 

Horseshoes is one of the important lines to be advanced 
in price. Brushes have also been advanced by one of the 
large makers to the extent of 10 per cent., and it is probable 
other manufacturers will also follow. Wrenches, steel 
squares, molasses gates, galvanized fence wire, roofing 
paint, roofing slate, pipe unions, hand and breast drills, 
sheathing, seine twine, paper bags, vises, are some of the 
other lines to show advances. Trade has been somewhat 
quiet during the week, as the holiday naturally interfered 
with the volume of business. 



MONTREAL MARKETS 



MONTREAL, July 4.— There are 
numerous advances this week 
for various lines and these have 
followed, as pointed out in HARDWARE 
AND METAL they would in all probab- 
ility follow, the recent changes made in 
regulations, freight rates, etc. The lines 
requiring various types of steel in their 
manufacture show the greatest increases 
and the end is not yet. It is very pro- 
bable, now that the advance in copper 
recorded in this week's report is ar- 
ranged, that there will be new prices 
for many articles of which copper is a 
component part. The tin situation still 
is firm. Copper sheets have advanced. 
Horse nails and horse shoes are higher, 
while solder is reduced. Pipe unions, 
drills of hand and breast varieties, 
sheathing, squares and seine twines, 
paper bags, horse and sheep shearing 
machines and vises all are marked^ up. 
The trade conditions are somewhat 



easier but there is ample business to 
keep staffs employed steadily. 

Very High Prices 

Obtain For Vises 

Montreal. 

VISES. — Advances of considerable 
amounts are made for vises of Samson 
design. These are in addition to those 
announced last week. The design known 
as "F" is now selling at $12.95 net as 
against $7.93 before; the "G" at $15.85 
as against a previous price of $9.73, and 
the "H" at $20.50 as against $12.60. For 
those who care to buy in lots of three 
the prices are each, 65c, 85c and $1 less 
respectively. 

Cylinder Head Gaskets, 
Spark Plug Wrenches Up 

Montreal. 

AUTO ACCESSORIES. — Advances are 



recorded for cylinder head gaskets of 
copper and asbestos manufacture. The 
approximate increase for this line is 
aboubt 5 per cent., although the change 
is not fully uniform, a few sizes showing 
a small decline. Combination spark 
plug wrenches are advanced also. The 
prices compare as follows: on the No. 21 
style, old trade price, 32c each, new price 
40c; lots of 12, 30c and 38c, and lots of 
48, 27i^c and 35c each. 

Sheet Celluloid Up; 

Also Reamers and Drills 

Montreal. 



AUTO ACCESSORIES.— Sheet cellu- 
loid used on automobile hoods is marked 
up to $1.07 from $1 for the 20 in. by 
50 in. size, and to 77c from 67c for the 
20 in. by 36 in. size. Samson hand drills 
are selling at $3.24 and were before 
$3.10, or in lots of 6 the price is now 
$3.08 each, an advance of 14c each. 
Reamers of the aligning type are quoted 
at $19.58 each for the three-in-orie style. 

Gear Pumps, Motor Oils, 
Adjustable Wrenches Up 

Montreal. 

AUTO GREASES, PUMPS, 

WRENCHES. — Among the advances this 
week in the accessory lines is one for 
greases and oils of the Veedol type. This 
applies to the various sized cans. The 
approximate increase for these lines is 
around 10 per cent. Bronze gear pumps 
too are higher, the advance being a very 
stiff one. For intance. Type A, No. 2, 
is quoted at $8.17 and was before $4.87; 
No. 3 of the same type is now $9 from 
$5.40, No. 4 $11.15 from $6.83, and so on 
through the list with like advances. 
Scholler adjustable wrenches are ad- 
vanced as well, the relative prices being' 
for the 4 in., old 86c., new $1.13; 6 in. 
old 86c, new $1.13; 8 in. old $1.06, new 
$1.04, and 10 in. old $1.33, new $1.74. 

Horse Nails Higher; 

New Shoe Prices, Too 

Montreal. . , 

HORSE NAILS AND SHOES.— Ad- 
ances are made this week in the price 
of Capewell horse nails. The new prices 
represent an increase over previous 
prices of about 37 %c per 25 pound box, 
and are as follows: No. 5, $22 per 100 
pounds; No. 6, $21; No. 7, $20; No. 8, 
$19, and No. 9 and larger $18. Horse 
shoes of both iron and steel make are 
higher too, the advance being 50c per 
100 pound keg. 



54 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



Unions and Drills 

Pipe Wrenches Go Up 



Montreal. 

PIPE UNIONS, DRILLS, WRENCHES 
— New prices are out for Dart unions, 
and these represent an increase over old 
prices of about 10 per cent. Some lines 
made by Goodell-Pratt are higher also 
and these include hand and breast drills, 
etc. The advance is about 10 per cent, 
on the lines affect/;d. Trimo pipe 
wrenches also take on new prices, the 
former discount of 47% per cent, being 
reduced to 42 ¥2 per cent. All parts for 
these wrenches are placed on a like 
basis. 

Sheathing, Steel Squares, 
Seine Twine All Higher 

Montreal. 



SHEATHING, SQUARES, TWINE.— 

New prices have been quoted for Eddy's 
impervious sheathing which now is sell- 
ing for $5.25 per 100 pounds, and repre- 
senting an advance of 25c. Steel squares 
are also higher and various advances 
have been made up to 10 per cent. The 
number of lines made is being reduced 
now by the American makers to about 
six distinct patterns. Seine twines are 
very much advanced, the average in- 
crease being lie per pound over previous 
prices, No. 6 now selling at 76c per 
pound; No. 9 at 72y2c; No. 12 at 69V2c; 
Nos. 15 to 36 at 69c, and Nos. 42 to 120 
at 68 %c per pound. 

Steel Wheelbarrows 

Likely to be Higher 

Montreal. 



WHEELBARROWS AND SCRAPERS. 
— The tendencies point to very much 
higher prices for steel tray wheelbarrows 
and for scrapers of the various types. 
There is still quite a demand for these 
and the supplies are running shorter all 
the time. Some lots have been gathered 
in from parts of the country where the 
demand has recently declined, but to 
bring them in from the States at pre- 
sent would mean that very high prices 
would have to be asked. Labor is as 
much as 60 per cent, higher and duty and 
freight advances would make the landed 
price of these goods to-day much higher 
than they have been. 

Sheet Copper Up 

Nearly 3c Within Week 

Montreal. 



SHEET COPPER.— Within the past 
week advances aproximating 2%c have 
been made. There is not a great deal 
of trading in this but what supplies are 
wanted are brought forward under 
license and are usually tinned here after 
coming forward. This makes the price 
considerably better as the tinned sheets 
are subject to a very high duty. The 
very high price of tin also is a factor in 
making costs advance for all tinned 
sheets. 



Wire Nails Firm and 

Undertone is Strong 

Montreal. 

WIRE AND NAILS.— Steady demand 
is reported from the usual sources for 
wire nails. Particularly does this apply 
from country points where there is more 
building activity than within the cities 
and towns of the province, with very few 
exceptions. Standard wire nails are 
selling on the held base price of $5.35; 
cut nails at $5.60 and smooth steel wire 
$6.25 per 100 pounds. The undertone 
is firm with revision to higher levels not 
improbable. 

Steadiness Feature 

For Iron and Steel 

Montreal. 

IRON AND STEEL.— With the ex- 
ception of the usual amount of trade that 
comes to hand from regular customers 
there is little movement. At the same 
time there is some activity in standard 
sizes and as yet orders can be filled with 

Playing Cards 

Taxed 8c Per Pack 

Since many hardware dealers handle 
playing cards it might be well for them 
to note the fact that all stocks require 
to have a stamp affixed showing that the 
8c tax per pack has been paid. In speak- 
ing with a hardware jobber early this 
week in Montreal it was pointed out to 
HARDWARE AND METAL as essen- 
tial on the part of all who stocked the 
cards, whether jobber or retailer. The 
advance thus made necessary should be, 
complied with as failure to comply with 
the law carries with it a heavy penalty. 



reasonable promptness, a little delay be- 
ing occasioned once in a while when 
special sizes are asked for. Prices are 
steady and firm with revisions probable 
of an upward nature. 

Common bar iron, per 100 lbs J 4 65 

Refined iron, per 100 lbs 4 80 

Horseshoe iron, per 100 lbs 4 80 

Norway iron 12 00 

Mild steel 5 06 

Band steel 5 05 

Sleigh shoe steel 6 05 

Tire steel 6 25 

Toe calk steel, per 100 lbs 6 96 

Mining tool steel, per lb 17Vi-0 19 

Black Diamond tool steel, per lb 18 -0 19 

Spring steel 6 60 

Single reeled machinery steel 6 50 

Iron finish machinery steel 6 10 

Harrow tooth steel 5 20 

Black Diamond cast steel, lb 20-0 21 

Solder Prices Down; 

Lead Products Hold 

Montreal. 

LEAD PRODUCTS.— There was a re- 
vision this week in the prices for solder 
which make the prices considerably lower 
and thus more inviting for those who 
wish to buy. This is the result of ad- 
justments made in the matter of ingot 
tin, the outlook for supplies having im- 
proved somewhat and licenses for sup- 
plies having been procured. The under- 



tone for manufactured lead products is 
firm and steady but there are no changes.- 

Lead pipe, lb .... 14 

Lead waste pipe, lb 15 

I .ead traps and bends Net list 

Lead wool lb 14 

Lead sheets, 2V> lb. sq, ft., lb 14 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3 Mi lbs. sq. ft., lb 13% 

Lead sheets, 4 to 8 lbs. sq. ft., lb 13 

Cut sheets, %c lb. extra, and cut sheets to size, 
le lb. extra. 

Solder (guaranteed) 56% 65 

Solder, strictly, lb 52% 60 

Solder, commercial, lb 48 55 

Solder, wiping, lb 51% 55 

Solder, wire (8 gauge) — 

40-60 62% 

45-55 68% 

Zinc sheets, casks .... 

Do., broken lots .... 

Trade in Sheets Fair; 

Stocks Running Lower 

Montri-al. 

SHEETS AND PLATES.— In view of 
the fact that when supplies in the job- 
bers' hands are exhausted no more can 
be secured from the States to replace 
these excepting under license and which 
will only be issued to cover those wanted 
for approved war purposes, it is impos- 
sible but that stocks here must gradually 
grow less. Trading is fair and at the 
present rate of absorption there will 
perhaps be enough supply to last for 
some months, of some gauges at least. 

BLACK SHEETS— 100 lb«. 

10 gauge $9 50 $9 00 

12 gauge 9 25 9 65 

14 gau<?e 7 25 9 00 

16 gauge 7 45 9 15 

18-20 gauge 7 50 9 25 

22-24 gauge S 00 9 60 

26 gauge 9 TO 9 75 

28 gauge ,? ?? 

10% oz. (28 English) 10 80 10 75 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

10% oz «10 00 

28 «» ! S! 

26 ea ' *| 

22 and 24 «a \ •» 

20 ga \°° 

1« ga • T' 

Old Serai) Copper is 

Likely to go Higher 

Mont'eal. — 

OLD MATERIALS.— In view of the 
advanced price basis for ingot copper 
there will very probably be a better price 
paid for the scrap metal in the imme- 
diate future. This will be from one to 
two cents per pound better than the ex- 
isting quotations if the suggestion of 
those engaged in trading is carried out. 
No further changes are made in the list 
this week but all lead and spelter pro- 
ducts are firm. 

Tea lead 07^4 07% 

Heavy lead pipe 07% 07% 

Yellow brass 121/2 13% 

Red brass « 22% 

Light brass 0*8 ■•■• 

Scrap zinc 05% 06 

Heavy copper " 22 9 I» 

Wrought iron. No. 1, per er. ton 27 00 „•••• 

No. 1 machinery cast 36 00 3" ?5 

Heavy melting steel 20 00 21 00 

Pipe scrap 18 00 20 00 

Stove plate, per ton 22 00 23 00 

No. 2 busheling 13 00 14 00 

Old rubbers, hoots and shoes 08Vi U8 /o 

Overshoes, lumbermen'! rubben 

boots 07 

Bicy:f^ti;es 04% 05 

Automobile tires 05 osy* 

Paper Bags, Paint Brushes 
and Horse Clippers High 

HORSE CLIPPERS, BAGS, BRUSHES 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



55 



— This week advances were made in the 
price of paper bags, the new discount 
being 25 per cent, from the list. Re- 
duced discounts apply for paint brushes, 
these being now 70% and 10% from 
the list. Horse clippers of the hand and 
power patterns are up as also are sjieep 
shearing machines. The advance will be 
about 12 per cent, and will also apply to 
the parts as well. Representative prices 
are: For the No. 1 hand, $9.75; "Chicago" 
No. 2, $14.25 each, and the sheep shear- 
ing No. 9, $14.25. 

Immense Im^ports of 

Gasoline Already Made 

Montreal. 

COAL OIL AND GASOLINE.— The 
markets as affecting refined oils are 
steady and without change. Coal oil is 
selling as follows: Royalite, 19c per gal. 
and Palacine and Electroline at 22c. 
There has been an increased importation 
of gasoline this year and the demand 
will make for a still larger showing as 
the season advances. Weather condi- 
tions have been somewhat against the 
use of pleasure cars to the extent that 
they would have been utilized, but even 
allowing for this there is a big output. 
Prices are steady and unchanged with 
motor grade selling still at 34c per Im- 
perial gallon. 

Ordinary Rope Trade 

Steady; Prices Hold 

Montreal. 

ROPE CORDAGE.— While there is not 
an excessive amount of trade for rope, 
speaking from the standpoint of regular 
demand, there is some movement, and 
this is usually of the sorting nature re- 
quired to keep stocks complete. For 
needs more directly related to the needs 
of the boats and the wants of munition 
makers there is perhaps more request. 
Prices hold without any change here and 
pure manila base price is 39c per pound; 
British manila 33c, and sisal 27 %c. 

Stoves Have Sold Well 

and Outlook Promises 

Montreal. 



STOVES AND WARES.— There has 
been a much better movement of stoves 
than is usually anticipated at this season. 
The trade realizes very probably the 
difficulties that the manufacturer may 
have to face with material outlook none 
too rosy and is therefore protecting him- 
self by buying well in advance. The 
general tone is a firm one, and while 
prospects of advances in the near future 
are not suggested there is little likeli- 
hood of any decline. The usual antici- 
pated trade for shelf goods and staple 
wares continues to be quite satisfactory 
without change of price being effected. 

New Copper Price 

Has Caused Some Stir 

Montreal. 



nounced from Washington for ingot cop- 
per. This is higher than was suggested 
even by the producers themselves. In 
a general way there have been no further 
changes and trading is on the quiet side. 

COPPER.— The fixing of price on 
ingot copper by the War Trade Board 
of the United States at 26c is somewhat 
of a surprise. It was not expected that 
this would reach this figure, making a 
straight advance of IVzc. This applies 
at once and will be effective until August 
15. In sympathy with this local prices 
have firmed to 30-31c per pound. 

TIN. — Spot prices are still high, as 
much as $1.50 per pound being asked for 
any Straits tin that is available. Some 
Lamb and Flag is selling at high as 
$1.25 per pound, while trading is re- 
ported to have been done at $1.10 per 
pound. Lower prices are obtainable on 
tin to arrive. 



SPELTER.— The chief feature here is 
that of more offerings of the Canadian 
produced article. American market con- 
tinues to advance but as the rise was 
rapid it is anticipated that there may be 
a reaction shortly. Price from 10% c 
to lie per pound. 

LEAD. — The same is firm and offer- 
ings light. Producers not anxious to sell 
forward and customers are required to 
cover their needs from hand to mouth. 
Price here 10%c per pound. 

ANTIMONY.— Not a great deal of 
trading here but in New York the acti- 
vity is marked, heavy buying making a 
firm market here as well as there. 
Prices are unchanged at 15-16c per 
pound. 

ALUMINUM. — There is no change and 
any trading effected is done at around 
50c per pound. 



TORONTO MARKETS 



TORONTO, July 4.— While t'^- 
number of price changes have not 
been quite as numerous as last 
week there have been some revisions of 
importance. Horseshoes is one of the 
important lines to advance in price. Cer- 
tain makes of wrenches are also higher, 
following the lead recently taken by 
some of the manufacturers. Steel squares 
cf one brand have undergone an upward 
revision. Molasses gates also show an 
increase in price. Business has been 
fairly good during the week, althougii 
it is not expected to be heavy at this 
season of the year. 

Horseshoes Go 

Higher by ^Oc Keg 

Toronto. 

HORSESHOES.— An advance of 50c 
per keg has been made effective in the 
nrice of horseshoes and a revised price 
list has been issued which shows some 
new sizes. Light and medium pattern 
Bell horseshoes are quoted at $6.75 for 
No. 2 and larger, and $7 per keg for 
No. 1 and smaller. Long heeled light 
iron, No. 2 and larger, $6.75, and No. 1 
and smaller, $7; snow pattern. No. 2 and 
larger, $7; No. 1 and smaller, $7.25. L. S. 
steel shoes, light pattern, sizes 1 to 6, fore 
and hind. No. 2 and larger, $7.20, and 
No. 1 and smaller, $7.45 keg. L. S. 
?teel shoes, featherweight pattern, all 
sizes to 4, No. 1 and smaller, $8.60; 
special countersunk steel shoes, all sizes 
to 4, $9.10; toeweight steel shoes, all 
sizes 1 to 4, $9.60 keg. Packing up to 3 
sizes in one keg, 10c per 100 pounds 
extra; more than 3 sizes, 25c per 100 
pounds extra. Prices are f.o.b. Belle- 
ville. 

Other Makes of 

Wrenches Go Up 



wrenches during the present week. On' 
6-inch size the increase amounts to $1.60 
per dozen and on the 21-inch $6.10 per 
dozen. Following are the new net prices: 
6-inch, $14.60 dozen; 8-inch, $17.50 
dozen; 10-inch, $20.40 dozen; 12-inch, 
$26.20 dozen; 15-inch, $35 dozen; 18- 
inch, $46.60 dozen; 21-inch, $56.80 dozen. 

Brushes Have 

Advanced lO Per Cent. 

Toronto. 



BRUSHES, BROOMS.— One of the 
large Canadian manufacturers of 
brushes advanced the price on their com- 
plete line 10 per cent, during the past 
week and there were indications that 
other manufacturers would follow. Ad- 
vances in lumber, bristles and other 
commodities that enter into their manu- 
facture is given as the reason for the 
increase. The advance applies to all 
paint brushes, kalsomine brushes, art- 
ists' brushes, in fact the complete line. 
Advices are to the effect that glass 
washboards are likely soon to be off the 
market owing to the difficulty connected 
with getting glass for their manufac- 
ture. Brooms held steady. 



List on Steel 



Squares Revised 



INGOT METALS.— The feature of the 
week is that of the new price basis an- 



WRENCHES. — Following the advance 
announced last week in the price of 
Stillson and Trimo pipe wrenches an 
advance has been recorded in Coe 



Toronto. ■ — 

SQUARES. — A revised list price on 
Eagle steel squares has been made ef- 
fective during the week, which in some 
instances provides for higher prices. 
List prices on the various numbers are 
as follows: No. 100, $21 dozen; No. 1, 
.'S20 dozen; No. 3, $19 dozen; No. 14. 
$17 dozen; No. 18, $17 dozen; No. 12, 
$14.50 dozen; No. 100 rafter, $53 dozen. 
Net price on No. 3 is $20.50 and on No. 
14, $17 dozen. 

Molasses Gates 

Show Upward Trend 

T«r«iita. 



MOLASSES GATES.— Higher prices 



56 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



have been announced during the week on 
molasses gates owing to the increased 
cost in connection with manufacture 
of same. Net prices are quoted as fol- 
lows: No. 1, $5 dozen; No. 2, $5.75 
dozen; No. 3, $6.50 dozen; No. 4, $7.20 
dozen; No. 5, $8.60 dozen. 

Difficult to Get 

Oil Tank Cars 



Bar Iron in Heavy 

Sizes Hard to Obtain 



Toronto. 

GASOLINE, COAL OIL.— Intimations 
have been made in some quarters that 
there will in all likelihood be a short- 
age of gasoline before the summer ii 
over owing to the difficulty which re- 
finers are experiencing in getting the 
use of oil tank cars. Many of these 
cars are being diverted to the use of 
the United States Government and on 
behalf of the Allies. Prices of oil pro- 
ducts held steady during the week but 
in a firm position. Gasoline is quoted 
at 33c per gallon. Price of coal oil ib 
unchanged at 18c and 21c per gallon, 
according to grade. 

Binder Twine 

Is Moving Freely 

Toronto. 



ROPE, TWINE.— Manufacturers of 
binder twine report a good movement 
at present in anticipation of the harvest 
which will soon be here. This stock is 
of course some that has been on order 
for some time. Price of the sisal fibre 
in the primary market at New York is 
down in conformity with the recent sale 
of 500,000 bales made on behalf of the 
manufacturers in the United States. 
Lower prices for binder twine are anti- 
cipated for next year. Rope is not mov- 
ing very freely as yet, although it is 
anticipated that the summer months 
should, see greater activity in this line 
on account of the shipbuilding activity. 
Prices on Manila rope hold unchanged 
at -SGc basis, with British Manila and 
New Zealand hemp at 33c. Sisal rope 
is quoted at 27y2C pound base. 

Advance of loc to 

15c in Fence Wire 

Toronto. 



WIRE, NAILS.— Following the firm 
position that has prevailed in the wire 
market for some time past and which 
has been referred to in these columns 
from time to time, an advance in some 
quarters has been recorded in the price 
of plain galvanized fence wire, the in- 
crease ranging from 10c to 15c per hun- 
dred pounds. Barb wire holds unchang- 
ed, but following is the upper range or. 
plain galvanized which represents an in- 
crease during the week: No. 9 plain gal- 
vanized, $6; No. 12, plain galvanized, 
$6.15: No. 13, $6.25; No. 9 coil sprinu, 
$6; No. 12, coil spring, $6.25. Smooth 
steel wire remains unchanged at $6.25 
base. Wire nails are also unchanged at 
the recent advance, base price being 
$5.30 per hundred pounds. 



Toronto. 

IRON AND STEEL.— Although a re- 
port from the United States was to the 
effect that certain mills are able to sell 
bar iron for commercial purposes for 
delivery within 90 days owing to the fact 
that the Government's requirements has 
not been urgent, local dealers express 
the opinion that this might be true in 
sizes below two inches in diameter but 
that large sizes are still difficult to se- 
cures An inquiry from a Montreal 
dealer among Toronto dealers during the 
week for bar iron over five inches in 
diameter would seem to indicate this as 
correct. Prices of iron and steel com- 



To Get Coal Hod and 

Stovepipe Material 

That Canada will be given such quan- 
tities of raw material as may be re- 
quired for making up supplies of coal 
hods and stove pipes for the coming 
season's demand seems assured. Such 
was the opinion expressed by a large 
Montreal manufacturer in speaking with 
HARDWARE AND METAL this week. 

"We are quite sure of receiving ma- 
terial for making up these goods, for the 
manufacturer has been able to persuade 
the LInited States War Board that they 
are essential articles. But the outlook 
for importing material used in making 
stove boards is not quite as promising. 
We are making an effort to have them 
admitted and hope that the merits of 
the case will also present themselves to 
those who have the decision in hand. 
Stove boards really may be looked upon 
as a real necessity, too." 

This sums up a matter of much im- 
portance to the hardware trade and will 
be reassuring to the readers of HARD- 
WARE AND METAL coming from one 
in definite touch with the situation. 



modities held unchanged during the week 
with a fair movement into consumptive 
channels. 

TORONTO — Per 100 lbs. 

Common bar iron $ 5 25 

Common bar steel 5 50 

Refined iron 5 65 

Angle base 5 75 

Horseshoe iron 5 50 

Tire steel 5 70 

Mild steel 5 50 

Norway iron 11 00 13 00 

Toe caulk steel 6 25 

Sleigh shoe steel 5 50 

Band steel, No. 10 5 75 

Do., No. 12 6 00 

Spring steel 9 50 1150 

Mining drill steel 19 00 30 00 

Sheet cast steel 42 45 

Tool steel 20 42 

Oil Stove Trade 

Not Brisk as Yet 

Toronto. 



STOVES, ENAMELWARE.— Manu- 
facturers of oil stoves report that the 
movement has not been heavy so far 
this year as the cool weather has inter- 



fered with the sale to a considerable 
extent up to the present time. Prices 
on the oil stoves of various kinds hold 
unchanged. Conditions in the regular 
stove and range trade remain as out- 
lined last week, namely, a fairly good 
movement or rather inquiry for this sea- 
son of the year. Enamelware is also 
in good sale with prices holding steady. 

Roofing Materials 

in Very Strong Market 

Toronto. ■ 

ROOFING MATERIALS, CORRU- 
GATED IRON.— Following the advance 
recorded last week in the price of metal 
shingles and metal roofing, there are 
indications that the ready roofing mate- 
rials are in very firm market and that an 
advance would not be improbable in 
these lines in the near future. There 
is a scarcity of asphalt reported due to 
the lack of ships to move this commodity 
from the Island of Trinidad. Slate roof- 
ings have advanced 40c per square dur- 
ing the week for both American and 
Canadian makes, making the price for 
14 x 10 American $8.25 and for Canadian 
$7.20 per square. Other sizes are in 
proportion. Corrugated iron held steady 
at the recent advance, prices being as 
follows : 

TORONTO— Per 100 Sq. Feet 

Corrugated Sheets — Gal'zed Painted 

No. 28 gauge $ 9 00 $ 7 50 

No. 26 gaug^ 10 00 8 50 

No. 24 gauge 15 00 11 25 

No. 22 gauge 18 00 14 00 

Nj 20 gauge 21 00 17 50 

No. 18 gauge 27 00 21 00 

Discount, 7% per cent. 

Sheets Have Been 

in Active Market 

Toronto. 

SHEETS, PLATES.— An active de- 
mand is reported for black sheets, par- 
ticularly for No. 10 and 12 gauge, al- 
though other sizes are moving out in 
good quantities also. Prices hold un- 
changed during the week. Supplies of 
some gauges are fairly good. 

BLACK SHEETS— Per 100 lbs. 

10 gauge 10 00 $12 00 

12 gauge 10 10 10 00 

14 gauge 7 45 7 90 8 40 

16 gauge 7 50 8 00 8 50 

18-20 gauge 7 80 7 55 8 05 

22-24 gauge 7 85 7 60 8 10 

26 gauge 7 90 7 65 8 15 

28 gauge 8 00 7 75 8 25 

3/16-inch plate 10 10 10 25 

%-inch boiler plate 10 00 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

10% oz 9 50 9 75 

. U.S. 28 9 20 9 45 

U.S. 26 8 90 9 15 

22 and 24 8 75 9 00 

18 and 20 8 60 8 85 

16 8 45 8 70 

14 . 8 35 8 60 

Iron Pipe Situation 

Is Not Improved 

Toronto. 

WROUGHT PIPE, BOILER TUBES. 
— ^Conditions in the manufacture of 
wrought iron pipe have shown improve- 
ment during the week, manufacturers 
still continuing to have difficulty in get- 
ting their raw materials. Prices were 
unchanged. Boiler tubes are moving 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



57 



slowly under the restrictions imposed by 
the Government. 

Boiler Tubes — Cold Drawn Lapweld 

1 inch $36 00 $ 

114 inch 40 00 

11/2 inch 43 Oe 36 00 

1% inch 43 00 36 00 

2 inch 50 00 36 Ob 

2% inch 53 00 38 50 

2% inch 55 00 42 00 

3 inch 64 00 50 00 

314 inch 58 00 

3% inch 77 00 60 00 

4 inch 90 00 75 00 

Lead Pipe and 

Waste Pipe Up ic 

Toronto. 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS.— The 
price of lead pipe and lead waste pipe 
have been advanced Ic per pound during 
the week, which makes the price of the 
former 15c jier pound and the latter 16c. 
Firmness in the market for pig lead 
at the primary points has been respon- 
sible for the advance. Some of the 
heavier lead sheets are also in firmer 
market, 4 to 8 pounds square foot sell- 
ing at 12 %c to 13c pound. Other pro- 
ducts held unchanged. 

Lead pipe, lb 15 .... 

Lead waste pipe, lb 16 .... 

Lead traps and bends Net list 

Lead wool, lb ISVo 16 

Lead sheets. 3 to ZV^ lbs. sq. ft., lb 13% 

Lead sheets, 4 to 8 lbs. sq. ft 121/2 13 

Cut sheets, %c lb. extra, and cut sheets to size. 

Solder, pruaranteed, lb 66 70 

Solder, strictly, lb 60 66 '/o 

Solder, commercial, ITa 55 62 

Solder, wiijing. lb 541/2 56 

Solder, wire, lb 65 70 

Zinc sheets, per lb. 26 

Old Materials in 

, Fair Deman 

Toronto. 

OLD MATERIALS.— There is a fair 
amount of old materials being offered 
to the large dealers and mills have been 
tak'ng reasonably good quantities. Prices 
held steady and unchanged at those 
given last week, as follows: 

Tea lead $0 05% 

Heavy lead pipe 07% 07% 

Yellow brass 12 13 

Red br?ss 21 

Light brass 0091/2 

Heavy zinc 05% 06 

Heavy copper 21 1/2 22 

Stove plate, per ton 17 00 18 00 

Old cast iron, per ton 25 00 26 00 

Overshoes, trimmed Arctics O6V2 

Auto tires O4V2 

Bicycle tires OSVo 

Per gross ton. 

No. 1 railroad wrought 26 00 27 00 

No. 2 railroad wrought 15 00 16 00 

Pipes and flues 12 00 

No. 1 busheling 16 00 17 00 

No. 2 busheling 12 00 

Country mixed scrap 16 00 

Lead Market Strong; 

Spelter Also Firm 

Toronto. 

INGOT METALS.— Lead was in a 
strong market during the week. Spelter 
was also firmer. Spot stocks of tin are 
light and prices continue high. - There 
is a good demand for nearly all ingot 
metals. 

COPPER. — Price was unchanged at 
29c to 30c per pound, but the market 
is one of firmness in view of the great 
demand that exists for this commodity. 

TIN.— There was an upward tendency 
in the ingot tin market during the week, 
prices ranging from $1.15 to $1.25 per 



pound with spot stocks very light. Sup- 
plies are reported on the way from 
Ens,land and are expected to reach Mont- 
real within a few days. 

SPELTER.— There was a better de- 
mand for spelter during the week and 
prices showed a steadily firm tendency, 
quotations being %c higher in some 
quarters at 10%c to lie per pound. 
Primary market also shows strength. 

LEAD. — There is a good demand for 
lead and under the stimulus of firmness 
in the primary market local prices show- 
ed an upward tendency at lO^^c to lie 
per pound. 

ALUMINUM. — Demand for aluminum 
still remains somewhat quiet with prices 
unchanged at 50c per pound. 

ANTIMONY. — Prices were higher by 
2c per pound in some quarters during the 
week, making the range locally from 16c 
to 18c pound. Demand is fairly good. 

PIG IRON. — It is now apparent that 
there will be no advance in the price of 
pig iron in the United States although 



the price of Lake Superior iron ore Was 
advanced 40c per ton. The advance in 
the ore is due to increased freight rates 
and it is intimated that the producer of 
ore will have to stand the loss. In view 
of the maintenance of the price in the 
United States Canadian prices will also 
hold unchanged. 

Sporting Accessories 

to Advance August I 



Toronto. 

CLEANING RODS, AXES, KNIVES. 
— Intimation has been made that the 
complete line of Marble sporting good5 
specialties will advance approximately 
10 per cent, on August 1. The line in- 
cludes such articles as cleaning rods,, 
safety axes, matchboxes, auxiliary cart- 
ridge chambers, screwdrivers, gun 
sights, hunting knives, compasses, and 
other lines. List prices will advance to 
the extent indicated, but discounts will 
remain unchanged. Increased cost of 
manufacture is given as the reason for- 
the proposed advance. 



LONDON MARKETS 



LONDON, July 4. — There has been 
considerable activity in haying and 
harvest suplies during the past 
week, there being a good sale for these 
lines now that the haying and harvesting 
season is here. The business in general 
lines has been seasonably good, with 
summer lines all in good demand. Ad- 
vances in price have been recorded on 
such lines as night latches, padlocks, 
auger bits, axle grease, cup grease, horse 
and sheep shearing machines, bung 
borers, food choppers, lard pressers, tub 
stands, canvas belting, plaster Paris, 
and hacksaw blads. It will therefore 
be seen that the number of changes has 
been considerable. Higher prices in 
other lines are also in prospect. 

Harvest Supplies 

in Active Demand 

London. 



net prices on some of the lines of night 
latches are as follows: No. 26, $6.05 
dozen; No. 34, $22 dozen; No. 34X, $22 
dozen; No. 37, $24.70 dozen; No. 42, 
$30.20 dozen; No. 343, $31.50 dozen. 
Prices on some of the various types of 
padlocks are as follows: No. 215, $6.55 
dozen; No. 225, $6.95 dozen; No. 326, 
$9.85 dozen; No. 453X, $2.10 dozen; No. 
4^5X, $3.15 dozen; No. 563, $10.75 dozen; 
No. 565, $12.60 dozen; No. 645 J, $3 95 
f'ozen; No. 805F, $14.50 dozen; No. 9465, 
$4.50 dozen. 

Auger Bits go 

to Higher Levels 



ROPE, TRACK HANGERS, TOOLS.— 
There is a good sale for hay fork rope 
at the present time due to haying sea- 
son. Rope prices are holding steady at 
previous quotations, pure manila 39c 
base, British manila and New Zealand 
hemp 33c base, sisal 27^/2 c base. There 
is also a fair sale for hay fork track 
rafters and rafter brackets. Track 
hangers Vz in. by 10 in. are quoted at 
75c dozen and 1/2 in. by 12 in. are quoted 
at 85c dozen. Rafter brackets are quoted 
at $1.08 dozen. Harvest tools are having 
a good sale with prices unchanged at a 
discount of 17^/2 per cent, off list. 

Night Latches and 

Padlocks Advance 

London. 

NIGHT LATCHES, PADLOCKS —An 
advance has been recorded in the pri-e of 
Yale night latches and padlocks N3-V 



London. 

AUGER BITS. — Higher prices were 
announced for auger bits during the week 
through .a changing of the discount on 
Gilmour brand. Common or Gilmou)- 
special are now being sold at a discount 
of 57% per cent, off list, while regular 
Gilmour auger bits are quoted at 47% 
per cent, off list. 

Axle Grease and 

Cup Grease Higher 

London. 



GR'P!/- S^. — Higher prices have been 
rvade effective on "Mica" axle grease and 
"Arctic" cup grease. New prices for 
ti-e former are as follows: 1-lb. tins, 4 
dozen to case, $18.30 gross; 3-lb. tins, 1 
dozen to case, $3.90 dozen; 3-lb. tins, 2 
dozen to case, $3.85 dozen. Arctic cup 
grease is now quoted at the following 
prices: 1-lb. tins, 24 to case, $4.85 case; 
less than case lots, 21c lb.; 36 to case, 
.S7.35 case; 5-lb. tins, 6 to case, $5.85 case; 
less than case lots, 20c pound; 10-lb. tins, 
6 to case, $10.05 case; less than case 
lots, 19c lb. 



58 



Horse and Sheep 

Shearers Advance 

Londgn. 

SHEARERS. — Stewart horse and 
sheep shearing machines were advanced 
during the week following the announce- 
ment of an advance by the manufac- 
turers. New list prices have been pro- 
vided for but previous discounts hold un- 
changed. Following are the list prices 
now prevailing: No. 1 horse clipper, $13 
each; No. 9 sheep shearing machine, 
$19 each; No. 8 sheep shearing machine, 
$16.25 each; sheep shearing attachment 
for No. 1 clipper, $12 each; top plates 
No. 360 and No. 90, $1.35 each; bottom 
plates, Nos. 361 and 91, $2 each; heads 
complete, $4.70 each. Above prices are 
all subject to a discount of 25 per cent. 

Buns Borers, Food 
Choppers, Lard Presses Up 

London. 

BORERS, FOOD CHOPPERS, PRES- 
SES. — New prices on bung borers, food 
choppers and lard presses provide for 
higher prices on these various lines. 
Bung borers No. 1 are quoted at $1.85 
each and No. 2 at $2.75 each. "Enter- 
prise" food choppers No. 22 are quoted 
at $6.75 each and No. 32 at $8.75 each. 
"Enterprise" lard presses are also higher 
In price, new quotations for No. 25 being 
$10.50 each and No. 35 $12.50 each. 

Stiver Flatware 

Shows Higher Ranse 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

good and stocks in this district are re- 
ported low. Painted black in 100 ft. 
rolls is quoted at $3.50 per 100 sq. ft., 
and in 50 ft. rolls at $3.55 per 100 sq. 
ft. Bronze screen wire is selling at 14c 
sq. ft. Poultry netting holds unchanged 
at 15 per cent, off list. Spades and 
shovels are also unchanged at 50 per 
cent, off list. There is a fairly good 
movement of Paris green at present at 
following prices: %-lb. packages, 66 %c 
lb.; 1-lb. packages, 64y2C lb.; 25-lb 
drums, 62 1/2 c lb.; 50-lb. drums, 61 Vac lb.; 
100-lb. drums, 61 1/2 c lb. 

Belting, Plaster Paris, 
Hacksaw Blades All Up 

London. 

BELTING, PLASTER PARIS, HACK- 
SAW BLADES.— Higher prices have 
been made effective during the week on 
Maple Leaf canvas belting which pro- 
vides for an advance of approximately 
12 1/^ per cent. New price on this line 
is now 15 per cent, off list. Plaster Paris 
is also in advancing market, new price 
announced during week on Hammer 
brand is $2.90 per barrel. Hacksaw 
blades are up 10 per cent., new prices on 
Victor brand are: 8-inch, 85c dozen; 9- 
inch, 95c dozen; 10-inch, $1.05 dozen; 12- 
inch, $1.25 dozen. 

Ljindseed Oil Firm; 

Turpentine Strong 



London. 

FLATWARE. — New prices on Nevada 
silver goods provide for a substantial in- 
crease in these lines of flatware. Tea- 
spoons No. 9 are quoted at $7.35 gross; 
No. 10, $8.50 gross; No. 11, $9.80 gross; 
dessert spoons No. 12, $1.50 dozen; table 
spoons No. 13, $1.70 dozen; dessert forks 
No. 14, $1.50 dozen; medium forks No. 
15, $1.70 dozen. . 

Tub Stands Higher; 

Fair Sale Lawn Hose 

London. 



LAWN HOSE, TUB STANDS.— Fol- 
lowing the advance made in the price of 
washing machines and wringers an- 
nounced last week another washing ac- 
cessory has been increased in price. Tub 
stands or wash benches are now quoted 
at $27.35 per dozen. Lawn hose and 
fittings are having a fair sale at follow- 
ing prices: Hose, 3-ply, No. 33, % in., 
9c ft.; % in., 10 %c ft.; % in., 12y2C ft.; 
4-ply No. 44, 1/2 in., lie ft.; % in., 12%c 
ft.; % in., 14y2C ft; 5-ply No. 55, V2 in., 
13c ft.; % in., 15c ft.; % in. 17c ft. 
Multiped corrugated, % in. 15 %c ft.; % 
in., 18%c ft.; % in. 2iy2C ft.; 1 in. 3iy2C 
ft. Less 5 per cent, in full reels. 

Screen Demand Good; 

Paris Green Moving 

London. 

SCREEN WIRE, PARIS GREEN.— 
The demand for screen wire continues 



London. 

LINSEED 



OIL, TURPENTINE. 



July 6. 1918 

Market for linseed oil continues to give 
evidence of considerable strength in 
view of the big advance in price of flax- 
seed during the week. Prices locally, 
however, hold unchanged as follows: 
1 to 2 barrels, raw $1.90 gal., boiled 
$1.93 gal.; 3 to 5 barrels, raw $1.89 gal., 
boiled $1.92 gal.; 6 to 9 barrels, raw 
$1.87 gal., boiled $1.90 gal. Less than 
barrel lots, add 10c gallon to single 
barrel price. Turpentine is still in a 
very firm market. The local supply, 
although showing some improvement, is 
still limited. Prices are unchanged at 
the advance announced last week: 1 bar- 
rel lots $1 per gallon; 2 to 4 barrel lots 
99c gallon; 5-gallon lots $1.10 gallon. 

White Lead and 

Putty Ho Id Firm 

London. 

WHITE LEAD IN OIL, PUTTY.— 

Prices of white lead in oil held firm at 
the advance announced last week. There 
is a slight sale of this commodity at 
present. Pure in ton lots is quoted at 
$17.25 per 100 lbs., and in less than ton 
lots, $17.60 per 100 lbs. Putty is firm 
at the new price, standard in 25-lb., 
50-lb. and 100-lb. drums being quoted at 
$5.55 per 100 lbs., and pure putty at 
$7.55 per 100 lbs. 

Good Sale of Nails 
There is a good sale of nails at pre- 
sent butb prices hold firm and unchanged 
at the recent advance. Wire nails are 
quoted at $5.30 per 100 pounds base and 
cut nails at $5.60 base. 



WINNIPEG MARKETS 



WINNIPEG, July 4.— Price changes 
for the past week show a greai; 
many changes, while advances 
in some lines appear particularly heavy. 
Many of the advances are due to manu- 
facturers buying raw material at open 
prices in order to be sure of their supply 
for the coming year and revising costs 
to conform with these purchases. Among 
the lines affected this week appear: tin 
plate, Paris green, expansive bits, fibre- 
ware, churns, batteries, standard' valves, 
coil and log chains, cow ties, trace 
chains, breast chains, halter chains, and 
saddlery hardware. Business for the 
past week is reported as normal, al- 
though reports indicate that dealers in 
some districts are holding off ordering;, 
as rain is badly needed in some locali- 
ties. 

Paris Green Up 5c ; 

Oil and Turpentine Hold 

Winnipeg. 



gal.; 



PARIS GREEN, LINSEED OIL, TUR- 
PENTINE. — New prices on Paris green 
have just been issued and show a 
straight advance of 5c lb., making to- 
day's price in 1-lb. packages 71 %c lb. 
and Vz-lh. packages, 73 %c lb. 

Linseed oil prices continue firm, with 
the usual demand at this season. To- 



day's prices are as follows: Raw, 
boiled, $2.03 gal. 

Turpentine prices, which have been 
soaring for the past two weeks, seem to 
be steadier during the week, prices re- 
maining firm as follows: — Barrels, $1.10 
gal.; %-barrels, $1.13 gal.; 5-gal. lots, 
$1.15 gal.; 1 gal. lots, $1.15 gal., plus 
the usual extras for containers. 

Expansive Bits 

Revised Upward 

Winnipeg. 

BITS. — Due to increased costs and the 
difficulty of procuring high-grade steel, 
expansion bits again show a heavy in- 
crease in price, the latest advance being 
approximately 25 per cent., making to- 
day's prices as follows: 

Expansion Bits— No. 72, $15.30 doz.; 
No. 71, $22 doz. 

Extra Cutters — No. 1, $5 doz.; No. 2, 
$5.10 doz.; No. 3, $5.25 doz.; No. 4, $6 
doz. 

Fibreware Prices 

Go Higher Still 

Winnipeg. 

FIBREWARE.— Fibreware prices con- 
tinue upward, practically every two 
weeks showing further advances. Prices 
just announced by the manufacturers are 
given below: 



July 6, 1918 

Fibre Tubs— No. 0, $23.80 doz.; No. 1, 
$20.45 doz.; No. 2, $16.95 doz.; No. 3, 
$14.45 doz. 

Star fibre pails, $5.20 doz. 

Glass and Metal 

Churns Advance 

WinnipeiT- 

CHURNS. — Prices on Dazey glass and 
metal chums have been revised after 
holding firm for the past year, the new 
prices showing- an increase of approxi- 
mately 10 per cent, over former quota- 
tions. To-day's market prices are given 
herewith : 

Glass Churns— No. 20, $1.45 ; No. 30. $1.S5 ; No. 
40. $2.35 each. 

Metal Churns— No. 300, $4.70; No. 400, $5.95- 
No. 600, $7.15: No. 1000, $11.85 each. 

Extra Glass Jars — No. 30. 60c each : No 40 
8Bc each. 

Batteries Have 

Advanced Slightly 

Winnipegr. 

BATTERIES. — Owing to increased 
freight rates a sli2:ht revision in prices 
of Columbia batteries has been neces- 
sary, making to-day's ruling prices as 
follows: 

Columbia Batteries— No. 6. less than 12. $43 80 
per 100: less than 50. $39.80 per 100: less than 
125. .$38.80 per 100: barrels, $36,30 per 100 

No. 8— Less than 12, $110.00 per 100: less than 
2o, $97.50 per 100; less than 50, $94.50 per 100- 
barrels, $91 per 100. 

Valves and Steam- 
Cocks Go Higher 

Winnipeg-. 

VALVES. — ^Hig-her prices of raw ma- 
terials, advanced freight rates and high- 
er costs of production all figure in the 
recent advance in standard valves and 
steam cocks, which are quoted to-day as 
follows: Standard valves, 20 per cent, off 
last; standard gate valves, 10 per cent. 
off list; steam cocks, 25 per cent. Net 
prices are given below: 

Standard Valves, Globe and Angle— % in 
58c each; % in., 62c: 5,4 in.. 80c; % in., $1.0l'' 
L',",^' !,V/"-= ^H '"•• *2-02; 1% in., $2.80; 2 in., 
$4.25; 2% in.. $8; 3 in, $11.20. 
_ Standard Gate Valves— i/o in., $1.50 each- % 
•^•:^|51.85; 1 in.. $2.52; 1% in., $3.35; 1^^ in. 

Standard Check Valves— % in., 52c each- % 
in., 56c; % in., 72c: % in., 92c: 1 in., $1.28- W± 
in., $1.80; 114 in., $2.52; 2 in., $3.80. 
_ Standard Steam Cocks— % in., 75c each; % 
in., 95c; % in., $1.30; 1 in., $1.75; 1% in., $2.80; 
1'^ m., $3.65; 2 in.. $5.50. 

Chain Again Goes 

to Higher Levels 

Winnipeg:. 

CHAIN. — Manufacturers have again 
issued new price lists covering coil 
chain, log chain, trace chains, cow ties, 
etc., and new prices show substantial in- 
creases over former quotations. Coil 
and log chain advances about $1.50 per 
100 lbs, trace chains 20 per cent., and 
cow ties 25 per cent. These advances 
are larg-ely due to the fact that manu- 
facturers are replenishing their stocks, 
and are forced to buy in the open mar- 
ket at prices in excess of last year's con- 
tracts, while increased freight rates, 
both in the United States and Canada, 
also add materially to the cost of produc- 
tion. New prices now in effect are given 
below: 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

»,P°A' ^^f'n— % in., $23 per 100 lbs.; 3-16 in., 
$18.40; Vi m., $16; .5-16 in., $13.60; % in 

V-^-% •■'M'?-;,.*^¥''= '^- in.. $12; 9-16 In!: 
$12; % jn. $11.75; % in., $11.50; % in., $11.35; 
1 in., $11.25. 

Log Chains— % in., $17.80 per 100 lbs.; 5-16 
$"3 8o'^'^*'' % i"- «".20; 7-16 in., $14; l/^ in.. 

Trace Chains— 6/0 x 6 ft., $10.50 doz. pair • 
6/0x7 ft., $11.50 doz. pair. ' 

Breast Chains, Polished— No. 220 x 28 in $8 70 
doz. ; 30 in., $9.35 ; No. 20, $4.50. 

Heel Chains— 85 x li/a in., $2.75 doz. • 1% 
m., $2.75 ; 2 in.. $2.75. 

Military Halter Chains— $6.80 doz. 

Cow Ties. Open Ring— I/O, $2.90 doz.; 2/0, 
.$3.20: 3/0, $3.50; 4/0. $4.40. Special— 1/0, $2 20- 
2/0, $2.40; 3/0, $2.80. Three Chain— 1/0, $2 9o' 
2/0, $3.20; 3/0, $3.50. 

Halter Chains— 5% off list. 

Saddlery Hardware 

Again Goes Higher 

Winnipeg. 

SADDLERY HARDWARE. — Prices 

on saddlery hardware again show an in- 
crease in prices after remaining steady 
for the past year. New prices show only 
a moderate advance, while manv lines 
remain at former prices. The following 
are the lines affected by the clause, to- 
gether with to-day's market prices: 

Harness Rings. Japanned — % in.. 86c gross • 
% in., 93c; % in., $1.10; 1 in., $1.40; 1% in., 
$1.80: IV2 in.. $2.45; 1% in.. $2.75; 2 in., $3. 



59 



XC— % in., $1.40; 1 in., $1.70; IV* in., $2.05: 
\V2 in., $3.0&: 1% in., $3.40; 2 in., $4.10. 

Screw Cockeyes— 465 x 1%, 80c doz.- liA 
90c; 1%. $1.15; 2, $1.40. 

Cleveland Bit Snaps— 421 x %. $5.50 gross. 

Roller Breast Snaps— 43S x 11^ in., $3 doz. • 
1% in., $3.25: 2 in., $3.50. 

Harness Buckles, Japanned, No 50 x •% in 
$1.40 gross; % in., $1.65; % in., $2; 1 in., $2.3o"; 
1% in., $3.20; 1% in., $3.80; 1% in.. $4.80; 2 
in., $5.80. 

XC— % in., $1.65 gross; % in.. $2; % in., $2.30- 
1 in., $2.60; I14 in., $3.80; II/2 in., $4.80; 1% 
in, $5.80; 2 in., $6.80. 

Trace Buckles— No. 175. 1% in., $1.10 doz. • 
1% in., $1.25 doz. No. 181, IV2 in., $2 doz.; 
1% in. $2.30; 2 in., $2.85 

Bar Rein Buckles— No. 150, i/^ in., $2 ; % in 
$3.10; % in., $3.60; 1 in.. $4.50; 1% in., $5.40; 
1% in.. $6.50; 1% in., $8.20. 

Bridle Bits— No. 47, stiff, $1.95 doz. ; No. 47, 
jointed, $2.15 doz. 

Tin plate is in 

Advancing Market 

Winnipeg. 

TINPLATE. — New prices are just an- 
nounced covering tinplate, which has 
held firm for the past year. The follow- 
ing prices are now effective f.o.b. Win- 
nipeg: 

Tin Plate— I.e.. 20 x 28. $32 : 20 x 33, $37.85, 
full boxes : 20 x 39. $22.50. half boxes. 

I.X.— 20 X 28, $35, full boxes; 20 x 33, $21.50; 
20 X 39, $24.65, half Lt:icc. 



PITTSBURGH MARKETS 



PITTSBURGH, July 4.— Steel makers 
have all shown themselves well sat- 
isfied with the continuance of steel 
prices for another quarter, as announced 
by the War Industries Board a week age. 
The Lake SuT)erior iron ore producars di'^- 
also well satisfied with the adjustment 
in iron ore, which effects an advance of 
45 cents a ton in prices at Lake Erie 
dock, making Mesabi non-Bessemer $5.50 
per ton. This advance was in substance 
passing on to the blast furnace the ad- 
vance in iron ore freights of June 25, 
which advance in general was ordered to 
be 30 cents per net ton. The difference 
between 30 and 45 cents is practically 
made up by the difference between the 
long and short ton and by the fact that 
ores run more commonly below the base 
guarantee than above in making actual 
sales based upon the regular prices which 
are for ore with the base iron content. 

In the circumstances many of the mer- 
chant blast furnaces are not satisfied 
with conditions. This feeling does not 
arise largely or chiefly from the advance 
in Lake Superior iron ore, for it is found 
more among blast furnaces in Tennessee 
and Virginia, where local and not Lake 
Superior ores are used. The difficulty is 
chiefly high labor costs, usually attribut- 
ed chiefly to inefficiency. Last Friday 
the American Pig Iron Association held 
in Pittsburgh the best attended meeting 
in its history, the chief discussion being 
of prices and costs and means to har- 
monize them. It is explained that while 
the proceedings were confidential the 
spirit of the meeting was not that of 
some furnaces complaining because their 
position as to profits was much poorer 
than that of some other furnaces, but of 
all furnaces being desirous of conditions 
being improved for the general good. 



Just what will be done, or can be done, is 
not known, but another meeting is to be 
held late this week in Cleveland. That 
a general advance in pig iron prices will 
be sought is quite doubtful as it does not 
look as though that would prove a suit- 
able solution. Unanimously, it is report- 
ed, the meeting decided to send a tele- 
gram to Bernard M. Baruch, chairman of 
the War Industries Board expressing its 
confidence in the board and its apprecia- 
tion of the fair manner in which the 
price matter had been handled at the last 
adjustment, setting prices for the third 
quarter of the year. 

Production 

Production in the main is at about the 
same rate as formerly. There has been 
some cooler weather in the past fortnight 
which has helped some as compared with 
conditions in May, both as to blast fur- 
nace operations and to steel production. 

Taking pig iron capacity at 34,000,000 
tons per annum and steel ingot capacity 
at 47,000,000 tons, pig iron is being pro- 
duced at 41,000,000 tons or a trifle more 
and steel ingots at about 43,000,000 tons, 
or, generally speaking, production is at 
between 90 and 95 per cent of capacity, 
production of pig iron showing a higher 
percentage than production of steel. The 
production of pig iron is restricted some- 
what by coke shortage, but only a trifle, 
and by nothing like the amount that ob- 
tained in the first two or three months 
of the year. Inasmuch as the consump- 
tion of pig iron by iron foundries is be- 
low normal there ought to be enough 
pig iron for full steel production, while 
instead steel production is not as good 
as pig iron production. The restriction 
in steel production is due to three causes, 
Continued on page 64. 



60 



July '6, 1918 



illllHIIIIIIIIIIIillllll 



WEEKLY PAINT DEPARTMENT 



:',i!i!iiiiiuing 



Sold 40 Gallons of Paint in One Sale 



Woman Came to Hardware Merchant Intending to Buy Materials and Have Paint 

Mixed — Advantages of Ready-Mixed Paints Presented, With Result That 

She Bought Latter Instead — Painters Also Using Large Quantities 



"p; 



^AINTERS who used to buy white 
lead and oil and mix their own 
-upply of paint for a given job 
are now being won over to the use 
of the ready-mixed line because, 
time and material considered, it 
costs them no more and in some 
cases less than by following- tlie old pro- 
cess. And often the durability of the 
ready-mixed paint is longer too." 

In this way, R. Letourneux, manager 
of the paint department of the James 
Walker Hardware Co., Ltd., St. James 
street, Montreal, summed up to a rep- 
resentative of HARDWARE AND 
METAL recently one phase of his ex- 
perience with the large trade coming to 
this store. It is a significant point and 
one which shows the trend of purchas- 
ing these days. It is also very prob- 
able that the experience of the Walker 
Company is one that finds duplication re- 
peatedly in other stores everywhere. 

It is interesting to note concrete in- 
stances where merchants have found an 
ever-changing demand for commodities, 
and particularly so where this applies to 



a staple line of merchandise. There can 
be no denying the fact that the average 
merchant prefers to handle a package 
line of goods — other things being equal 
— and in many instances the net results 
and the profits accruing can be more 
clearly defined. 

Supplying Paint to Tenants 
In a large city such as Montreal there 
must, of necessity, be a considerable 
amount of painting by the owners of 
apartments. An interesting point was 
made in this connection by Mr. Letourneux 
when he remarked "Landlords will sup- 
ply paint to their tenants." 

This is a point of considerable interest 
to those who might be in a position to 
cater to a demand of this nature. Even 
in the smaller towns there are those 
who might be approached and urged to 
buy paint for the protection of their 
property occupied by others. Many a 
tenant would be willing to co-operate 
and to assist in the application of the 
much-needed paint. 

Toward this end the paint dealer, as 
suggested in this interview, could ad- 



vertise such a scheme. Coming in this 
way to the attention of owners of pro- 
perties and tenants alike, it would tend 
to bring the two closer together in the 
discussion of such a matter. Eventually 
it would result in a probable sale and 
this might be made the more likely by 
the cultivation, personally of both par- 
ties by the merchant himself. Generally 
speaking, a few facts about the actual 
cost of painting a given building will 
enlist the interest of the prospect. Real 
prejudice is largely dissipated when the 
real facts are unfolded, regarding costs 
and values compared with the protection 
afforded. 

False Estimates Lead to a Sale 

"I had tried for some weeks to sell 
one of my best customers the required 
paint for his house. There was not a 
week for some time during which I failed 
to approach him on this proposition," 
said a hardwareman recently. "One day 
he came in, was communicative enough 
to say that he was about to place his 
Continued on page 64. 




View Showing an Attractive Window Display of Paints Recently Shown by Lariviere, Inc., Montreal. Note the Display of 
Brushes on Panels at Both Ends and at the Rear. Color Cards Were Also Part of the Display. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



61 





"Yes, I always find 
Readier Sales for 
Boeckh Made Brushes! 

"Boeckh Brushes" are used 
extensively in every line of 
trade. 



There's a high-grade 
Boeckh brush especially 
suitable for every require- 
ment. 

Taken as a whole, the 
Boeckh line is one big ag- 
gregation of best sellers. 




THE BOECKH COMPANY, LTD., Toronto, Canada 



Unequalled in Appearance and 
Unbeatable in Wear 

Looked at from any point of view the superiority of 

B MOORE'S HOUSE COLORS 

is strikingly evident. 

Painters who use **Moore's" once use it afterwards in 
preference to any other. They appreciate the fine 
"job" that Moore's Paints make possible. 

This superiority of "Moore's" is due to the care taken in its 
manufacture, to the quality pigments, to the pure linseed oil, 
the best driers, etc. Though Moore's Paints dry hard they retain 
sufficient elasticity to prevent cracking or peeling. Thus they 
combine tip-top appearance with unbeatable wear. 

The Moore Agency proposition will interest you. Write for 
particulars. 

Benjamin Moore & Company, Limited 

WEST TORONTO 





62 



July 6, 1918 



1 s 



WEEKLY PAINT MARKETS 



MONTREAL 



M 



ONTREAL, July 4.— Whether it 
is because of the somewhat 
cooler weather or from other 
causes, the condition of business has 
been very satisfactory throughout the 
spring months to date. Specialties have 
sold well with many, and yet the big 
call has been for the staple lines, the 
consumer realizing that in war times 
such as these the essential painting has 
first claim. Insecticide sales have been 
heavier than usual, one firm stating that 
they had done several times the business 
this year that they usually handle. 
White lead in oil holds firm, with even a 
further firming tendency. Turpentine is 
as scarce as ever, but a little improve- 
ment is looked for by some, while others 
think it will be just as scarce weeks from 
now. Linseed oil is a trifle easier and 
putty prices are firm, with the outlook 
for revision upward. 

No Turpentine Yet; 

May be Some Relief 

Montreal. 



TURPENTINE.— There is really no 
improvement in the situation. Produc- 
tion is not meeting the requirements and 
the amounts in the hand"^ of paint men 
are reported to be small. Sale of substi- 
tutes has developed, but many do not 
care to sell this extensively. From the 
best information available some supplies 
are on the way, but when these will ar- 
rive is not at all certain, and they will 
be but a small factor as related to the 
needs of the trade. No quotations are 
made. 

Turpentine — Per Imp. Gallon 

1 to 4 barrels 

S barrels and over .... 

Small quantities 10c advance over 1 bbl. prices. 

Linseed OH Holds 

Steady and Firm 

Montreal. 

LINSEED OIL.— While the position 
of flaxseed as attained during the pre- 
sent week records a price of around $3.84 
per bushel, there is a better tone to the 
oil market. This is perhaps due to a 
moderate demand upon stocks that might 
be stated as in better shape than for 
some time. Cheap oil is not looked for, 
however, and it is very probable that 
little change from the present price 
basis will be arrived at just now. Re 
ports from the producing sections of the 
West — both Canadian and United States 
— are not too reassuring as to the out- 



look for a big flaxseed yield. Range of 
prices here is as follows: 

Raw Boiled 

Linseed Oil — Imp. gal. Imp. gal. 

1 to 4 barrels $1 7G-$1 86 $1 78i/>-$l 89 

5 to 9 barrels - 1 75 - 1 771/2 

10 to 25 barrels - 1 74 - 1 761/2 

Putty Prices Hold 

With Firmness Feature 

Montreal. 

PUTTY.— The firmness of the market 
continues to hold. Several large jobbers 
expect that there will be an advance ere 
long. There is evidently no probability 
of a change being made other than up- 
ward, raw materials being scarce in 
some instances, and all of them on a high 
price basis. The trade requirements are 
not large, but the outgo is seasonable. 

Per 100 lbs. 

standard Putty — 6 ton 1 ton • Les* 

Bulk, in barrels $4.00 $4.15 $4.36 

Do.. Va barrels 4.15 4.30 4.50 

Do.. 100 lb 4.85 5.00 5.20 

Do.. 25 lb 4.85 5.00 5.20 

Do., 121/2 lb 5.10 5.25 B.45 

3 and 5 lb. tins 6.85 7.00 7.20 

1 and 2 lb. tins 7.35 7.50 7.70 

Pure linseed oil putty. $2.00 per 100 lb. ad- 
vance on above prices. 

Glaziers' putty — $1.60 per 100 lb. advance on 
above prices. 

Terms : 2%, 15 days, net 60. 

Every Indication For 

High White Lead in Oil 

Montreal. • 

WHITE LEAD IN OIL.— The active 
demand for pig lead has continued, and 
this has had much to do with the firming 
of prices. There now seems to be some 
promise that the high water mark has 
been attained, and trading is being 
effected at the high prices recently de- 
cided on in the States. But even with 
the advance of $1 per 100 pounds here 
for white lead in oil the market is 
strong. Some even suggest that higher 
prices are probable in the not distant 
future. Five-ton lots are selling on the 
basis of $16.50 per 100 pounds; ton lots 
at $17, and smaller quantities at $17.35. 

Paint Market Firm 

And Will Probably Hold 

Montreal. 

MIXED PAINT.— There is much firm- 
ness to mixed paint. This will very 
probably be characteristic of it for some 
time to come, and the suggestion has 
been made that higher prices would be 
named very probably in the not distant 
future. The consensus of opinion indi- 
cates, however, that present prices will 
probably prevail during the summer. 



There is no guarantee of this, due to the 
disturbing factors that are constantly 
confronting the paint maker. It is gen- 
erally conceded that a well-selected stock 
of paint is worth its cost at the present 
time. Sales are very well maintained. 



TORONTO 

TORONTO, July 4.— Conditions in 
the paint trade continue good, 
manufacturers reporting a good 
demand for ready-mixed paints. Tur- 
pentine is in strong market, with sup- 
plies firmly held at primary points. De- 
mand for turpentine, however, has hard- 
ly been as active as during the previous 
week. There has been a good movement 
of arsenate of lead and Paris green dur- 
ing the week now that the potato bugs 
have started to put in an appearance. 
Glass, putty, and white lead in oil hold 
steady. 

Linseed Oil Has 

Firmer Undertone 

Toronto. 

LINSEED OIL. — There is a firmer 
undertone in the market for linseed oil 
as a result of the big advance which took 
place in the price of flaxseed in the 
Western markets during the past week. 
Under the influence of reports of ex- 
treme dryness in certain parts of the 
United States, which is expected to ad- 
versely affect the crop, prices of flax- 
seed advanced as much as 20c per bushel 
in three days during the week. It re- 
mains to be seen whether these seed 
prices will be maintained. Owing to the 
higher cost of the seed some of the 
crushers advanced the price of oil 5c per 
gallon in large quantities. Jobbers have 
not increased their price at time of writ- 
ing, but the trerid of the market is un- 
doubtedly one of firmness, as the facts 
indicate. 

Raw Boiled 

Imp. gal. Imp. gal. 

1 to 2 bbls $1.83-$1.90 $1.8.5y2-$1.93 

3 to 5 bbls 

G to 9 bbls u- v'":v; 

Less than barrel lots 10c per gallon higher than 
single barrel price. 

Turpentine Market 

Still Very Strong 

Toronto. 

TURPENTINE. — The market for tur- 
pentine maintained its strength during 
the week under the stress of slightly 
higher prices at primary points. There 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



03 




;~':'«»«sg' 



\\ 



Shingle Stain 
Sales Are Growing 

The house illustrated below is typical 
of the houses that are being erected 
to-day throughout Canada. Most Cana- 
dian houses have shingle roofs, but shingles 
are also used in large quantities for the sides 
of houses as well. Shingle Stain is therefore 
in growing demand, and has become a staple 
product. 

B-H Anchor 
Shingle Stain 

like Brandram's Genuine B.B. White Lead, B-H 
"English" Paint and other B-H products, is backed 
by the B-H reputation for quality— it has no 
superior on the market to-day. 

B-H Anchor Shingle Stain may be had in 14 
different shades. Price list, colour cards and 
sample slats on request. 

Send in your order for B-H Anchor Shingle 
Stain now. 

Particulars of our atractive agency proposition 
without obligation. 



v.w^'H 



% 







ERSON 



■as LIMITED 



(y/irtCNTREAI^ MAl-ir>«.X 6^ JOHN TORONTO WINNlPBO EDMONTON CAUOARY 

iva.u'',' ''.',"/ /'''.'/ ///'/",»"///-' v/.w/MW/// I ',. ,. ,„//,-■,■/ ://„"/ , /i, /imii,//y'U,/f,r/rn..i. ;-,,.. •■!,. ,-/ a,.,-,.-- — iiii.ii — -ul^ — -j— 



% 




TOP Quality 
House TOP 



64 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



is every indication that we have seen "The price which I have quoted you 

within recent weeks some of the lowest is the best one we can name. It is well 

prices that we are likely to have for worth the money, .considering the cost 

some time to come. With available of material to-day and we are absolutely 

stocks carried over from last season, in prepared to stand back of that paint, 

strong hands in the South, and with the It has given satisfaction for many years 

prospect of greatly decreased produc- to hundreds of users and you are taking 

tion, signs seem to indicate a firm mar- no chance whatever on using it for your 

ket, and perhaps even an advancing one house." 

for the immediate future. Locally the Could Buy For Much Less 

demand was not as heavy as reported "For many years," continued this mer- 

last week Range of quotations hold ^^ant, "I had always tried the plan of 

unchanged. ^^ ^^^ getting from my prospect the size ol 

1 barrel $0 88-$i 00 his buildings and then figuring out a 

2 to 4 barrels - — bulk price for the material. In this 

5 gallon lots - 1 10 ^^^ j ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^.j^^^. ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

J?nn4^iirr P^i^tc ^^^" usually frightened into not paint- 

I\UL/Jing 1 UUHi - jjjg because of their idea that it would 

AdvdflC6 lOC Gdllofl cost them a small fortune to do it were 

Toronto agreeably surprised when my figures 

MIXED PAINTS.— Manufacturers re- ^^^.^^''^^''^V^ u n •„ „ 

port a continued good demand for paints ^he Blank Lumber Co will sell me 

of various kinds. Repeat business is "^^ pamt for $3.75 a gallon. I had ask- 

coming along in steady volume. One of ^" $4.25. 

the lines to register an increase during "Yes," I replied, "and how much paint 
the week was that of Everjet roofing ^'^'^ ^^ take of theirs?" 
paint, the increase amounting to 10c per " 'Well, they estimate that ten gal- 
gallon, which makes the following prices ^ons will do the job and this is what I 
current: In barrels, 60c gallon; half- expect to buy from them'." 
barrels, 65c gallon; 5 and 10-gallon lots, "While I had not remembered the ex- 
75c gallon; 1 gallon cans, $9.25 dozen. ^ct estimate made by myself I knew 

this to be excessive indeed. On consult- 

Whhe Lead in Oil ^"^ ™y figures again I found that six 

■jiyf- • J y, J gallons had been suggested as an out- 

Matntatned at Advance side estimate. Thereupon I showed my 

Toronto. Mr. Farmer where he could get his job 

WHITE LEAD IN OIL, INSECTI- done— and a good one at that with 100 
CIDES. — The price of white lead in oil per cent, pure paint — for ten dollars or 
was maintained at the advance recorded more less than by using the paint sold 
last week. Movement of this com- by the lumber dealer. Of course I made 
modity is reported somewhat light on the sale. And to better the situation my 
the whole, although one large dealer customer had more paint than, he re- 
stated the movement has been fairly quired and this was returned and credit- 
good. Price on ton basis is $17.25 per ed to him." 

100 pounds. . ^ , , , Selling to Large Institutions 

Pans green and arsenate of lead have ^ , . „ ,, , , , ,. . . 

been in active demand during the week, I" the city of Montreal and adjoining 

due to the appearance of the potato there are many large schools, hospitals, 
bugs. Prices on these lines hold un- asylums, etc. Many of these do their 
chano-ed °wn painting and it is real worth-while 

business to land the contract for the 
Glass and Putty material needed in painting the average 

/I l\ /T ' cn 7 institution of this sort. 

Are Moving Slowly "A woman came in recently," said 

Toronto. Mr. Letourneux, "prepared to buy white 

GLASS, PUTTY.— Movement of glass lead and oil. I argued with her the 
and putty are light at present, as this splendid advantages to be derived from 
is not the season of the year when they the use of ready-mixed paint. She went 
are in very much demand. Some of the away, considered and discussed the mer- 
wholesalers are engaged in taking stock. its of the latter with those responsible 
Supplies of glass are reported fairly for the outlay and returned to us in a 
good as a result of recent arrivals to day or two with an order for 40 gallons 
wholesale houses. Prices were un- of our best ready-mixed paint. She saw 
changed. Putty is also unchanged on the advantages pointed out to her in our 
the basis of $4.70 per 100 pounds bulk argument. 

in barrels, with 25-lb. and 100-lb. tins Factors in Increasing Sales > 

at $5 55 

Among the factors attributing to suc- 
cess in the Walker store's paint depart- 
ment is that of a well-stocked line at 
all times. Representing a large manu- 
facturer they carry the complete line. 
Thus, when a prospect enters desiring 
any specialty or a regular color it is 
ready to be wrapped and the carrying 
of a comprehensive line has thus been 
justified. 

"Car owners are now realizing, too, 
that they can paint their own cars and 



this means a very decided saving as the 
average car will cost to paint, if sent to 
the car painter, from $60 to $70," con- 
tinued Mr. Letourneux. "This year we 
have had an increase in the sale of auto- 
mobile enamels of 25 per cent." 

Windows — More Sales at High Prices 

"Even at the high price of paints this 
year we are showing an increase in our 
paint turnover from that of last year," 
continued Mr. Letourneux. "This applies 
as well to flat wall paints which are 
selling better all the time. 

"We get direct results from our win- 
dows, too. These are changed frequently 
and always made attractive. They are 
suggestive and we are selling not only to 
the house-owners but in 10 and 15-gallon 
lots as well to the painter." 



SOLD 40 GALLONS OF PAINT IN 
ONE SALE 

Continued from page 60. 

order and wanted to know what was the 
best price per gallon that I could give 
him. I had carefully adhered to the 
regular price asked my other customers 
for the same point, as this was but fair 
to them." 



WEEKLY MARKET REPORTS 

Continued from page 59. 

to hot weather to a slight extent, to 
labor inefficiency to a somewhat greater 
extent, and to the greatest extent by the 
supply of scrap. This is commonly 
spoken of as a "shortage in scrap" but 
that is not altogether correct in point of 
tonnage. The steel mills are moderately 
well supplied with scrap, such as it is, 
the chief difficulty being that the ma- 
terial is of such poor character. There 
is very little heavy melting steel except 
what arises at the mills themselves, 
while the scrap that comes in from out- 
side comprises large quantities of shell 
steel turnings and a lot of miscellaneous 
stuff, which weighs up in tonnage but 
does not make either for large heats or 
for the greatest number of heats per 
week. Open-hearth steel plants are pro- 
ducing, in actual tonnage several per 
cent, less than they would normally on 
the basis of the number of open-hearth 
furnaces they have in operation. 

A general campaign is being started to 
increase the suuply of scrap by hunting 
for material, and the services of everyone 
are sought, to locate scrap and get it 
into the channels. This is good in its 
way, but the difficulty is the scrap thus 
found will be of very miscellaneous 
character, not that calculated to produce 
the greatest tonnage of steel per open- 
hearth steel furnace operated. Produc- 
tion of both pig iron and steel will doubt- 
less be on a somewhat reduced scale in 
July and August on account of weather 
conditions. 

Distribution 

Each week brings further testimony 
that the "schedule of purposes entitled 
to preference treatment" promulgated by 
the War Industries Board June 6 is a 
very comprehensive list and covers near- 
ly all the lines of commercial consump- 
tion now active. Many lines are omitted, 
but their demands at this time are much 
below normal, while furthermore the 
secret is out that such buyers in most 
cases have rather comfortable stocks. 
If they are concerned about supplies it 
is for the future rather than for the pre- 
sent. 



July 6/ 1918 . 



HARDWARE AND iM E T A L 



65 



ESTABLISHED 1849 

BRADSTREET'S 



Offices TbruuKliout the ClviUzed World 
OFFICES IN CANADA: 

VancoDTer, B.C. 
Hamilton, Ont. 



CalKary, Alta. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Halifax, N.S. 
Liondon, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Victoria, B.C. 



Montreal, Qne. 
Quebec, Que. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Sydney, N.8. 



Beputation gained by long years of 

rlforoui, consclentlouB and successful 

work. 

Thgmas C. Irving, a'.".t:?i'^c"„'.'d*: 

TORONTO 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 

& COAL CO., Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



THE "WANT" AD. 

The "want ad." has grown from a 
little used force in business life into 
one of the great necessities of the 
present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to the 
"want ad." as a matter of course for 
a hundred small services. 

The "want ad." gets work for work- 
ers and workers for work. 

It gets clerks for employers and finds 
employers for clerks. It brings to- 
gether buyer and seller, and enables 
them to do business though they may 
be thousands of miles apart. 

The "want ad." is the graat fi rce in 
the small affairs and incidents of daily 
life. 



Help Wanted 

An ad for help in the 
Classified Advertising 
Section will bring the 
right kind of replies. 

Try It Out. 

Hardware and Metal 

Classified Advertising Section 

143-153 University Ave., Toronto 




THE BERRY LABEL 

Discriminating buyers have long since learned that all 
Varnishes, Enamels and Stains bearing the Berry label 
can be safely trusted for quality and uniformity. 
"Berry" brands have behind them a record of sixty years 
for absolute dependability. They are safe to recom- 
mend and easy to sell, because the Berry label is so 
widely recognized among all classes of varnish buyers 
as a guarantee that all products sold under it are always 
reliable and true to description. 

The "Berry" line is a safe basis for a large and cumu- 
lative varnish business. 

RERRY BROTHERS 

■ ■ (IMCOB.POB.ATED> ^ ^k 

*"^W)rld's Lar^est\^rnisli Makers V^ 

Established 1858 
Walkerville, Ont. 



677 





ENDS POTS a PANS 

Show the housewife how easy it is to make leaky kitchen 
utensils good as new in an instant by means of Vol- 
Peek. 
, Vol-Peek can be applied with the finger— no tools neces- 
sary. And ithe mended article is ready for use in *.wo 
minutes or less. 

Vol-'Peek is put up in attractive display stands that 
make sales easy. Order from-your wholesaler or from us 
direct. 

NAGLE & CO.. Box 2024. Montreal 






66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 

These prices are for such quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers. Large buyers can frequently make purchases at better prices. 



AMMUNITION 

Dominion Metallics — B.B. Caps, 
25% B.B. Caps, 20% : 22 short, 
blaok, :12 lone black, 22 long, 
■mokalcat, 20% ; 22 short lesmok or 
22 long lesmok, 20% ; 22 thort, 
imokeless, 30% ; 22 long rifle, black, 
S2 long rifle, smokeless, 7V4% ; 
•ther rim fire, 10% ; center fire 
pistol, add 36% list; center fire 
•porting, add 60% ; shot cartridges, 
■ame as ball; brass shot shell, 20% ; 
primers, add 36% list ; empty shot 
shells, 6%; blanks, add 25%; bul- 
lets, add 40%. 

Terms : Net 90 days, or 2% dls- 
eount for cash in 30 days. 

"Dominion" Loaded Paper Shells 
"Crown" Black Powder, 10% on 
Ifat ; "Sovereign" Bulk Smokeless 
Powder, net list ; "Regal" Dense 
StUokeless Powder, net list ; "Im- 
perial" Shells, both Bulk and 
Dense Smokeless Powder, net list ; 
"Canuck" Smokeless, net list ; 
Empty Shells, 5% ; 90 days net. 

P.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Lon- 
don, Hamilton. 
AMERICAN AMMUNITION 
List Prices. 
Subject to 10% advance on list. 
B.B. caps, $3.50 per M. ; B.B. 
caps, concave ball. $4.40 ; 22 short, 
$5 ; 22 long, $6 ; 22 long rifle, $7 ; 
22 short smokeless, $5.35 ; 22 long 
smokeless, $7.50 : 22 long rifle, 
smokeless, $8.75 per M. 

Sporting Cartridges— Centre Fire 
SwSkelesa 303 Winchester. $72.26 
per M. ; 303 Savage. $72.25 ; 303 
British, $95 : 32 Winchester special, 
$72.25 ; 38-55 Winchester. $76 ; 401 
Winchester self-loading, $76 per M. 
Primers— Nos. 1, 1% and 2%, 
IMO: Nos. 1 and 2 (100 in box), 
W.80: Nos. 1-W, 1%-W, 2V4-W and 
l-W. and 5, and 6V4, 100, in box, 
l».80: Berdan Nos. 1, IVz, 2 (250 in 
6ox). SS.60; Berdan Nos. 1, IJ4, Z 
(100 in box), $8.80; new No. 4 
16.60; U.M.C., 83, $6.60. 

Shot, standard, 100 lbs., Toronto, 
tl7.35-$19.75; Montreal, $18; net 
extras, as follows, subject to cash 
discount only: Chilled. $1.60; buck 
■nd seal, 80c; No. 28 ball, $1.20 
per 100 lbs. ; bags less than 25 
&«., %c per lb. : f.o.b. Montreal, 
Toronto, Hamilton, London, St. 
John and Halifax freight equalized. 
AUGER BITS 
Standard List Prices per dozen. 

»/l« 16.00 18/16 $12.00 

*/,^^ 5 00 19/;6 14.00 

8/16 5.00 20/16 14.00 

«/16 6.00 21/16 16.00 

T/J« B.OO 22/16 16.00 

*7l8 B.OO 23/16 18.00 

J.^16 6.00 24/16 18.00 

"»/16 6.00 25/16 21.00 

11/16 7.00 26/16 21.00 

l'/16 7.00 27/16 24.00 

18 '16 8.25 28/16 24.00 

l'«^16 8.25 29/16 27 00 

1I5''1« 9.50 30/16 27 00 

1«/16 9.50 31/16 so.nn 

'T/16 12.00 32/16 30.00 

Discounts from Standard List 
prices : 

Beaver. 57%%; London, 60% 
Ford's Auger Bits, 35 to 27%%. 
Gilmour Auger Bits, 47%%. 
Gilmour Car Bits. 37%%. 
Gilmour Eye Augers, 35%. 
Gilmour Ship Augers, 12%%. 
Rockford Auger Bits. 50 and 10'^.. 
Irwin Auger Bits. 15% to 17%% off 

list in Catalogue No. 10, 1905. 

F.O.B. Toronto. Montreal London 
AXES and Hamilton. 

Single Bits, doz $14 00 $16 00 

Double Bit 16 60 19 60 

Boys' Axes 12 00 14 00 

Hunters' Axes 11 00 12 00 

Bench— No. 2, doz... 12 50 13 20 
No. 3, doz... 13 50 14 20 
No. 4, doz... 14 50 15 25 



Single Double 
Bit Bit 

Sager $15 00 $20 00 

Dominion Pride 14 50 19 50 

St. Clair handled... 15 60 

Sager Boys 12 50 

Kitchener Boys 12 00 

Sager Hunters 11 60 

Kitchener Hunters'... 11 00 .... 
F.O.B. Nontreal, Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London. 
BABBITT 

Prices on babbitt fluctuate with 
the metal markets and prices are 
quoted on application. Prices range 
from 14c to $1.15 a lb. 
BELTING (Leather) 

Discounts apply to Revised List 
of Feb. 14, 1907. 
Extra Quality, 30, 5%. 
Standard Quality, 40%. 
Side Lace Leather, lb. .$1.40-$1.75 
Cut Lace Leather, lb... 1.60- 1.95 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. 

BELLS (Farm) 

No. 1 X 40, lb $4 00 

No. 2 X 50 lb 6 00 

No. 3 X 60 lb 7 50 

No. 4 X 100 lb 10 00 

F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. 
BOLTS AND NUTS 

Discounts apply to list of 

Feb. 1. 1913. 

Carriage Bolts ($1 list), % in. dia. 

and smaller, 10%. 
Carriage Bolts ($1 list), 7-16 dia. 

and larger, net list. 
Machine Bolts, % in. dia. and 

smaller, 10%. 
Machine Bolts, 7-16 in. dia. and 

larger, net list. 
Sleizh Shoe Bolts, all sizes, net list. 
Coach and Lag Screws, 25%. 
Skein Bolts, 20%. 
Square Head Blank Bolts, net list. 
Bolt Ends, net list. 
Plow Bolts, net list. 
Elevator Bolts, net list. 
Fancy Head Bolts, net list. 
Shaft Bolts ($3 list), net list. 
Step Bolts, large head ($3 list), net 

list. 
Whiffletree Bolts, net list. 
Nuts, square, blank, add to list 

$1.50. 
Nuts, square, tapped, add to list 

$1.75. 
Nuts, hexagon, blank, add to list 

$1.75. 
Nuts, hexagon, tapped, add to list 

$2. 
Stove bolts, 66%. 
Tire bolts, 35%. 
Terms : 2% off 30 days from date 

of shipment. 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. Hamil- 
ton. London, Ont. 
BORAX 

Lump Crystal Borax, lb 14-14% 

F.O.B. Montreal, London, Toronto. 
BRASS Per lb. 

Spring sheets, 24 gauge and 

heavier, base $0 43 

Rods, base % to 1 in. round.. 38-40 

Tubing, seamless base 45%-50 

Tubing, iron pipe size, base 

% in. and up to 3 in 45%-50 

Copper tubing, iron pipe size. 

base % in. up to 3 in 47%-53 

F.O.B. Montreal and Toronto- 
BOILERS (Range) 

SO-gal. extra heavy $14.50-$17 

30-gal. Standard 14 00 

F.O.B. Montreal and Toronto. 
BOARDS (Wash) Zinc Doz. 

Pony $2 25 

Improved Globe 4 90 

Neptune 4 90 

Standard Globe 4 90 

Original Globe 5 40 

Jubilee 5 50 

Newmarket King 5 50 

Diamond King (glass) 6 00 

Western King (enamel) ... 7 00 

Beaver (brass) 7 00 

F.O.B. Newmarket. 



BUTTS Wrought Steel:— | 

No. 840 5% 

No. 800 2%% 

No. 838 6% 

No. 808 5% 

No. 804 15% 

Nos. 802, 842, 844 6% 

Nos. 810 and 814 net list 

No. 830 2%% 

F.O.B. Toronto, Montreal, London, 

Hamilton. 

Spring Butts 
Chicago Spring Hinges, List. 
Triplex Spring Hinges, 20-10-5%. 
Chicago Mortise Floor (5000), 

33 1-3%. 
Chicago Relax Floor (6000), 25-10- 

10-7%%. 
Chicago Premier (4000), 16 2-3%. 
Chicago Ajax (3000), 16 2-3%. 
Chicago Fire Station, add 10% to 

list. 
Lavatory Door Hinges, 20-5%. 
Chicago Screen Door (2000), 40- 

7%%. 
Chicago Screen Door (3000), 16 2-3 

and 5%. 
Non-Hold Back Screen Door, on ap- 
plication. F.O.B. Chicago. 
CANS 

For discount on milk and cream 
cans, etc., see list under head of 
wares, etc. 

B.B. B.B.B. 

Fire Welded Fire 

CHAIN Proof Coil Welded 

Mont'l Tor'to Mont'l Tor'to 

3-16 in... $22.75 $19.85 $ $ 

yi in. .. 16.75 15.25 21.75 20.25 
5-16 in... 14.15 13.65 19.00 17.00 
% in. .. 13.00 12.75 15.90 16.50 
7-16 in... 12.75 12.45 15.65 16.00 
% in. .. 12.50 12.15 15.50 15.75 
9-16 in... 12.50 12.15 15.50 15.75 
% in. .. 12.35 12.00 15.25 15.50 
% in. .. 12.25 11.85 15.10 15.25 
Vs in. . . 12.05 11.65 15.00 15.2.J 
1 in. ... 11.90 11.50 14.85 15.25 
Electric Welded 

B.B. B.B.B. 

3-16 in. ..$16.95 $17.40 $ $ 

% in. .. 13.15 13.30 13.75 15.55 
5-16 ir... 11.85 11.75 12.00 14.0C 
% in. .. 11.65 10.50 11.75 12.75 
7-16 in... 10.45 10.50 11.75 12.75 
% in. ., 10.20 10.50 11.75 12.75 
% in. .. 10.10 10.50 11.75 12.75 
% in. .. 9.95 10.50 11.75 12.75 
Montreal and Toronto. 

American Proof Coil Chain 
B.B. B.B.B. 

3-16 in $16.76 

5-16 in 12.00 $12.75 

% in 11.00 11.90 

7-16 in 10.75 11.70 

% in 10.50 11.60 

% in 10.35 

Electric Welded B.B.B.— Chain, Vi 
in.. $13.75 : 5-16 in., $12 F.o.b. To- 
ronto. 

Cow ties. 12%-15% ; trace chains, 
net list: dog chains, 25 to 32%%; 
halter chains, 25 to 32%% ; tie-out 
chains. 50% : stall fixtures, net 
list; breast chains. 2%%. F.O.B. 
Montreal, Toronto. Hamilton. Lon- 
don. 
CEMENT 

Cement, per bbl.. $2.70 in car- 
lots : $3.25 bbl. in small lots. 

Paris plaster. five-barrel lots. 
$3.25 : single barrel. $3.25. 
F.O.B. Toronto. 
CHURNS 

List price hand churns: — No. 0. 
S9: No. 1. $9: No. 2. $10: No. 3. 
$11; No. 4. $13: No. 5. $16. 

List prices power churns : — No. 0. 
Sll; No. 1. $11; No. 2. $12; No. 3. 
$13; No. 4. $17; No. 5, $20. 

Discount of 20% f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Fergus, London, St. 
Marys. 

Discount of 17%% f.o.b. Mon- 
treal, Ottawa. Kingston. 

St. .Tohn. N.B.. 20%. 
CHOPPERS, FOODUniversal (doz.) 

No. $17.75 

No. 1 21.50 



No. 2 27.00 

No. 3 35.00 

F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. 
Russwin — 

No. $17 7« 

No. 1 21 70 

No. 2 24 98 

No. 3 »4 60 

CLOTHES LINE (GaWmnizcd) 
No. Per 1000 ft. 

17— 7-strand, 100 ft. lenKtiu..$6 80 
17— 7-«trand, 60 ft. lengths... 7 00 
18— 6-strand, 100 ft. lenjcth... 6 40 
18 — 6-strand, bO ft. lengths... 6 4e 
19— 6-strand, 100 ft. lenEtlu.. 4 76 
19— 6-strand, 50 ft. lengths.. 5 0« 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, London 
COPPER Montreal Toronto 

Casting ingot, see weeklv refv^rt,. 

Bars, % to 2 in $43 50 $43 00 

Plain sheets, base In 

oz. and heavier. . . 47 00 44 00 
Copper sheet, tinned. 

14x60 in., 14 oz.. . 49 00 

Copper sheet, plan- 
ished, base 16 oz. 

and heavier 58 00 45 00 

Braziers' in. sheets, 

6x4 base 46 00 44 00 

Above prices are full sheets and 
bars. Cut sheets and bars are St 
per lb. higher. 
COMBS 

Curry combs: No. Ill, $1.55; No. 
121, $1.70; No. 122, $2.25; No. 127, 
$2.25 ; No. 100, $2.80 per dozen. 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Hamil 

ton, London 
CORD (SASH) 

No. 6, lb 72 

No. 7, lb 71 

Nos. 8, 9, 10, 12 70 

F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. Hamil 

ton, London 
CANADA PLATES 

Prices nominal. Montreal Toront* 
Ordinary, 52 sheets.$ll 76 $ ( 60 
Galvanized 
Apollo Crown Gorbals 

18x24x62 

60 

CHARCOAL. TIN PLATES 
M.L.S. and Famous — Per box 

IC, 20x28 base $28 •• 

IX, 20x28 base (nominal) ... 82 09 
IXX, 20x28 base (nominal) . . S6 00 
IXXX, 20x28 base (nominal) 40 00 

F.O.B. Toronto 
Raven and Murex Grades — 
IC, 20x28 base, 112 sheets. .$4«' 00 
IX, 20x28 base, 112 sheets.. 89 9« 
IXX, 20x28 base, 66 sheets.. 20 0« 
IXXX. 20x28 base, 66 sheets 21 0» 

(Nominal) f.o.b. Montreal. 
TERNE PLATES 

J. C, 20 X 28, 112 sheets 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
COKES, AMERICAN 
Bessemer Steel — 

20x28 IC, 112 sheet SO OO 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
"DOMINION CROWN BEST"— 
DOUBLE COATED TISSUE 

Nominal 

IC. 14x20 base $20 00 

IX. 14x20 base 18 T» 

IXX, 14x20 base 19 69 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
CLOCKS 

Big Ben $2 92 

Good Morning, each 1 16 

Lookout 1 46-1 69 

Sleenmeter 1 65 

F.O.^. Montreal. Toronto, London. 

Hamilton. 
CROWBARS, $8.50-$9.50 per 100 

lbs. 
DRILLS 

Bit Stock Drills. SO to 37%%. 
Rd. Shk.. 30 to 37%%. 
Wood Drills. 37i/,%. 
DOORS, SCREEN 

Kasement. No. 1. $24.84 to $27.24 
doz. ; No. 2 and 3. $28.20 to $80.90 
doz. F.O.B. Toronto. 

EMERY CLOTH 

See under Sandpaper. 
ENAMELWARE 

See prices under heading Wares 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



67 




He Hates Harris 
Heavy Pressure 

Because he loses his drag in bearings lined with this superior Babbitt. His aim to 
hold back, waste power and wear out is defeated by the good qualities of 

HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE, "The Babbitt Without a Fault" 
All good Hardware stores sell Harris Heavy Pressure with confidence; they know our 
guarantee is back of every pound. 

OUR SPECIAL LINES 
BABBITT SOLDER LEAD PIPE SHEET LEAD 

We are the largest exclusive Metal dealers in the Dominion. 
Our prices are right. Our service excellent. 



THE CANADA METAL CO., LIMITED 



Hamilton 



Montreal 



TORONTO 



Winnipeg 



Vancouver. 




Time Saved 

in knowing, not experimenting, 
is Money Earned. 



Our "Warranted Pure" 

Linseed Oil 

is the last word in Reliability. 

The Canada Linseed Oil Mills, Limited 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place ivith letters to be answered. 



68 



FILES AND RASPS 

Dissounts below apply U list 
of Nov. 1, 1899. % 

Great Western, Amer 50 

Kearney & Foot, Arcade 50 

J. Barton Smith, Eagle 50 

P.H. and Imperial 50 

Disston Brand 40 

Globe go 

Nicholson 30-32 '/2 

Black Diamond 32^2 

Delta Files 37^ 

F.O.B. Toronto, Montreal, London, 

and Hamilton. 

FITTINGS 

Cast iron fittings, 10% off list. 
Malleable bushings, 20-25% ; cast 
bushings, 20-25% ; unions, 35% ; 
plugs, 171/2-20% off list. Net prices: 
Class B, black, 24-26c lb. ; Class C, 
black, 16-17C lb. : galvanized. Class 
B, 34-36C lb. ; Class C, 24-26c lb. 
For fittings by the pound add 12%. 
F.o.b. Toronto and Montreal. 
GRILLS, ELECTRIC 

Single heat, round $6 00 

Three heat, round 7 15 

F.o.b. Toronto. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



GRINDSTONES 



Per 100 lbs. 



Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick... $2 50 

Under 40 lbs 2 60 

Bi-Treadle, each ' 6.25 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
HALTERS (SNAP AND RING) 

Doz. 
Russet rope shank, 1".$11.25-$12.75 
Russet roiw shank, 1% in... 13 85 

Black rope shank, 1 in 18 78 

Black rope shank, 1% in. 12. 50- 13.85 
Hand sewn, no shank, 1 in.. 17.40 
Hand sewn, no shank, I14 in. 20.20 

Halters (Sisal). 

7-16 in. gross, $24 ; 9-16 in., $36. 
F.o.b. Toronto. London — 7-16 in 
$2.10 doz. ; % in., $2.66 doz. 

HAMMERS. SLEDGE 

Can., 5 lbs. and over, cwt. ..$17 50 
Masons, 5 lbs. and over, per 

„<=wt 20 00 

Masons, 5 lbs. and under. ... 22 50 

Napping, up to 2 lbs 25 00 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 

London. 
HANDLES (WOOD) 

All hickory handles, 10%. AH 
neclcyokes, whiflfletrees and double- 
trees, 10%. All ash and maple han- 
dles, wood hay rakes, horse pokes, 
20%. 

F.o.b. St. Thomas, London, 
Strathroy, Toronto. 

HANGERS, BARN AND PARLOR 

. , List 

Atlas, No. 12 50 

Atlas, No. 1 12 95 

Atlas, No. 2 15 90 

Steams, 4 in 7 40-7 65 

Stearns, 5 in 10 25-10 65 

Perfect, No. 1 10 45 

Perfect, No. 11^ 13 20-13 80 

Storm King and safety hang- 
ers, doz 10 25-10 65 

Steel track, ly^ in 9.00-12.00 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
HEATERS, ELECTRIC 

Majestic, 1 Burner 7 50 

Majestic, 2 Burner 11 2.=i 

F.o.b. Toronto. 

HINGES, TEE AND STRAP 

Heavy, Net Prices. 

Strap Tee 

4-inch, dozen pairs $2 34 $1 99 

S-inch 2 89 2 50 

6-;n<:h 3 12 2 81 

8-inch 4 22 3 21 

lO-ineh 7 49 5 70 

12-inch 9 28 9 05 

1^-inch 10 61 9 20 

Light, List Prices. 

3-in., doz. pairs... $1 00 $1 00 
4-in., doz. pairs... 1 20 1 10 

5-in., doz. pairs... 1 40 1 30 

6-in., doz. pairs... 1 70 1 50 

8-in., doz. pairs... 2 50 1 80 

lOin., doz. pairs... 3 50 2 40 

Discount 20 and 2%% off list. 



Screw Hook and Strap Hinge — 

Under 12 in., per 100 lbs 8 00 

Over 14 in., per 100 lbs 7 50 

Extra hooks for above % in., 

per lb 8 

Extra hooks for above, % in., 

per lb 7% 

F.o.b. Toronto, London, Hamilton 
and Montreal. 

HAY KNIVES 

Spear Point $14 00 

Lightning 12 50 

Heath's 12 60 

HOES. Grub $7.25 

HOOKS, GRASS. English 

Canadian Fox 
No. 2, per doz... $3 40 $5 00-$5 50 
No. 3. per doz... 3 50 5 50- 6-40 
No. 4, per doz... 3 50 6 00- 7 40 

Little Giant 5 25 - 

Berden 5 25 ......... 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
HORSESHOES Price per keg 

No. 2 No. 1 
Sizes and and 

Patterns made larger smaller 

Less 20c 
Light iron ... 0-7 $6 75 $7 00 
Long heel light 

iron 3-7 6 75 .... 

Medium iron.. 1-8 6 75 7 00 

Heavy iron ... 6-8 6 75 .... 

Snow 1-6 7 00 7 25 

New-light "XL" 

stel 1-6 7 20 7 43 

Fetherweight 

"XL" steel .0-4 8 60 

Special counter- 
sunk 0-4 9 10 .... 

Toe-weight (front 

only) 1-4 n 6C 

•All sizes. 

Packing — Up to 3 sizes in one 
keg, 10c per 100 lbs. extra. Mor<> 
than 3 sizes, 2Bc per 100 lbs. extra. 
F.o.b. Montreal and Belleville. 
Terms — Cash in thirty days, less 

2% discount. 
TOE CAULKS 

Nos. 0. 1. 2 and larger, sharp and 
blunt, $2.25 to $2.90 box. 

HOSE, LAWN Toronto 

Corrugated, l/^ in., 100 ft. ..$15 75 

Corrugated. % in.. 100 ft 18 75 

Corrugated. V4 in., 100 ft. . . 21 50 
Corrugated. 1 in., 100 ft 31 50 

Less 5% for full reels. 500 ft.. 
F.o.b. Toronto and London. 
HAT AND COAT HOOKS 

Coppered wire. 8 in., 96c gross. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. 
London. 

IRON AND STEEL. 

See weekly report. 
IRON, TINNED 

Prices nominal. Subject to premium 

where stocks are obtainable. 
72x30 up to 24 gauge, case 

lots 

72x30. 26 gauge, case lots 

Less than esse. 50c ner 100 lbs. ex- 
tra. F.o.b. Montreal. 

IRONS (SAD) 

Mrs. Potts. No. 55. polished, 

per set 2.20-2.30 

Mrs. Potts, No. 50, nickel- 
plated, set 2.30-2.40 

Mrs. Potts, handles, japan- 
ned, doz 1.30- 1.50 

Sad irons, common, plain, 3, 

4 nnd 5 lbs 20 

Sad irons, plain. 6 lbs. up. . . . 7 00 

Sad irons, common, plated... 5 50 

Princess Electric, each 3 35 

Canadian Beauty Electric Irons — 

Style A $3 7" 

Style B 4 12 

Hotpoint Domestic Electric 

Iron, each 4 7.5 

Gasoline Sad Irons, each 4 25 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London, 
Hamilton. 



LADDERS, ETC. 

Step Ladders Per ft. 

Crescent jg^ f^^ 

Household I9c ft. 

Standard, 4-12 ft 21c ft. 

Electrician 30c ft. 

Heavy duty .' 47c ft] 

Extension 35c ft. 

Common and Roped E.itension. 

T> „ .Per ft. 

Perfect, 6 to 10 ft. only $0 3- 

Hercules, 4 to 10 ft 33 

Hercules, 12 to 14 ft. .......'. 33 

Faultless, 4 to 10 ft. only... 29 

Ontario, 4 to 10 ft. only 26 

Shelf Lock, 4 to 8 ft. only...! 21 

Per ft. 

Up to 32 ft 23 

34 to 40 ft ; ; ; 26 

London— Up to 32 ft., 20c ; 34-44 
ft., no stock. 

Fire Ladders up to 32 feet art- 
twice the price of ordinary exten- 
sions. Over 32 ft. are supplied 
with supporting legs at three times 
the price. 

Single and Fruit Picking. 

10 ft. to 16 ft 20c ft. 

18 ft. to 22 ft 23c ft. 

Chair ladders, each 2 00 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
Montreal. 

LANTERNS Per doz. 

Short Globe, doz $12 50 

Jap'd Dash, doz 16 00 

Search Dash, doz. X-ray.l5. 76-16. 10 

Little Bobs $2.10-$4.2C 

Copper, well japd., doz.... 18.25 
F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton. Ix)ndon. 
Montreal. 

LANTERN GLOBES Dozen 

Cold blast, short 95c-$1.10 

Cold blast 95c-$1.10 

3 doz. cases. 85-90c doz. ; 6 doz. 
cases, 85c dozen. 

Cold blast, short ruby 4.00-4.20 

Cold blast, common ruby. 4.00-4.20 

Less 6c a doz. in 6 doz. lots. 

F.o.b. Toronto, London, Hamilton 
and Montreal. 

LATCHES 

Steel Thumb, No. 2. per doz. 1 90 

Steel Thumb. No. 8. per doz. 2 50 

Steel TTiumb, No. 4, per doz. 4 70 

Bam Door, No. 6, per doz. 2 55 

Barn Door, No. 9, doz 4 70 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto, London. 
LEAD 

For pig lead and lead ane" zinc 
products see weekly report. 
MACHINES (WASHING) 

List Each 

Canadian g go 

Dowswell g 00 

Noiseless 15 50 

Hamilton n qo 

Snowball 16 OO 

Momentum 16 50 

New Century, styl- A 16 50 

New Century, style B 18 00 

Playtime, engine drive 19 50 

Ideal Power 28 00 

Seafo.nm, electric 102 00 

Seafoam, engine drive 44 00 

New Idea, electric 134 00 

Sunshine 8 60 

Popular. No. 1 9 50 

Kconomic 11 50 

Champion 17 00 

New Excell-AIl 18 00 

Blue Bell, without stand 16 50 

Puritan Water Motor Wash- 
er, complete 28 00 

Hydro, One Tub, engine drive 46 50 
Low pressure water motor 

washer, each 30 00 

Connor ball-bearing, with rack 18 60 
I X L 18 59 



Gem 16 50 

Winner, plain 13 50 

Connor Improved 9 00 

Jubilee ..T 15 00 

Canada First 19 00 

Discount, 30% and 10%. Freight 
equalized with Montreal, Ottawa, 
Toronto, Hamilton, Kingston, Lon- 
don and St. Mary's on shipments 01 
quarter dozen and upwards. 

MALLETS Per doz 

Tinsmiths, Zy^ x SMs in.$1.00-$1.75 

Carpenters', No. 3 6.80 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. 

MATTOCKS 

Cutter, doz $12 00 $12 50 

Pick doz 12 00 12 50 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London, 
Hamilton. 

MIXERS, BREAD 

Universal — 

No. 4, doz $34 65 

No. 8, doz 39 60 

MOPS 

Mops, O-Codar, doz. net... $12 00 

Sprustex, No. 2, doz $8 00 8 40 

S.W. Mops, complete, doz. 4 25-4 85 

Mop Sticks, doz.. No. 8 1 •'^^-1 SK 

Cast Head Mop, doz 1 90-2 00 

Crescent, doz 3 10 

Crank wringing, doz 6 25 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. Hamilton. 

London. 
MOWERS, LAWN 

Adanac 689i 

Woodyatt 40% 

Empress 40% 

Mayflower 40% 

Star, Ontario, Daisy 40% 

F.o.b. Toronto, Guelph, London, 
Hj'TYiiltnr 

NAILS 

List adopted July 10, 1912. 
Advances over base on common 
wire nails in kegs. 

2% inch 15c 

1 inch $1 3 inch 10c 

11^ inch 1 314 inch 10c 

114 inch 65c 3% inch 10c 

1*4 inch 40c 4 inch 5c 

1% '.nch 40c 414 inch Be 

2 inch SOc 5 inch base. 

2^4 inch SOc 5% inch base. 

2% inch 15c 6 inch base. 

6% to 12 inch-2 Ga. and heavier, 
25c over base. 

Standard Steel Wire Nails, f.o.b 
Toronto, London, Hamilton. Milton. 
$5.30 base. 

Freight equalized on above point*. 

F.o.b. Montreal. Gananoqne, Col- 
lingwood and Owen Sound, $5.35 
base. 

Freight equalized on above polnto 

Windsor, Walkerville, Sandwich, 
fo.b. factory points, carload freight 
allowed, $5.42%. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Port Arthnr. 
Fort William, $5.05-$5.35 base, 
f.o.b. factory : no freight allowance. 

Moulding, Flooring, Slating, Box. 
Fence. Barrel Nails, 25c per 100 
lbs. over common nail price. Fin- 
ishing Nails, 60c per 100 lbs. ad- 
vance over common nail price. 
Clinch Nails and Sash Pins, 76c per 
100 lbs. over common nail price. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, 60% oS 
miscellaneous list, f.o.b. Toront*, 
Montreal. Hamilton, London. 

Cut Nails — Montreal, $6.70 base ; 
Toronto, $5.65 base ; London, $5.60 ; 
Hamilton, $5.6S. No equalization of 
freights. 

Roofing Nails — American, large 
head, keg, $9.00. London, $10.00. 
F.o h. Montreal. Toronto, Hamilton. 
London. 

NAILS (HORSE) 

C Brand 

Size 
Capewell— Per 100 lbs. 

No. 8 $22 00 

No. 6 21 00 

No. 7 20 00 

No. 8 19 00 

No. 9 and u;j 18 00 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



69 



The Success of Research and Study 

Ramsay's A^ate Floor 

Varnish 




Than 



A Good Selling Line for Summer Trade— ORDER NOW 

Manufactured Exclusively By 

A. Ramsay and Son Company 

Makers of Paints and Varnishes since 1842 

TORONTO MONTREAL Vancouver 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out woiu and place with letters to be answered. 



70 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



No. 9 4 12Vi 

•Jo. 10 4 12i/o \ 

•lo. 11 4 I2V2 I 

No. 12 4 12y2 i 

Discount from above is 10% in 
small quantities and 10 and 5% in 
full boxes. 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, 

Vancouver, St. John. 

"M.K.M." BRAND 

Net Price List Per box 

Ne. L«nitthB of 26 ibe. 

3 1%" $19 00 

4 1%" 9 00 

6 1 15-16" 4 00 

« 2%" 3 75 

7 2 5-16" 3 50 

8 21/2" 3 50 

9 2 11-16" 3 25 

10 2%" 3 25 

11 3 1-16" 3 25 

tt 3%" 3 26 

F.o.b. London, Hamiltsn, Mon- 
treal, Toronto 
NETTING, POULTRY 
List prices per roll of 60 lineal 
yards. Adopted March, 1909. 

2-inch mesh and 19 ga. wire. 

12 inch...$l 80 48 inch...$ 6 20 
18 inch... 2 65 60 inch... 7 70 
24 inch... 3 40 72 inch... 9 20 
30 inch... 4 00 84 inch... 10 50 
36 inch... 4 75 96 inch... 12 00 
42 inch.. . 5 50 

1^ inch mesh and 19 ga. wire. 
12 inch... $3 50 42 inch... $10 50 
18 inch... 5 00 48 inch... 12 00 
24 inch... 6 30 60 inch... 15 00 
30 inch... 7 75 72 inch... 18 00 
36 inch ... 990 

1 inch mesh and 20 ga. wire. 
12 inch... $4 00 42 inch... $12 00 
18 inch... 5 60 48 inch... 14 00 
24 inch... 7 00 60 inch... 17 00 
30 inch... 8 50 72 inch... 20 00 

% inch mesh and 20 ga. wire. 
24 inch... 10 50 36 inch... $15 00 
30 inch... 12 75 

% inch mesh and 22 ga. wire. 
24 inch... $16 50 36 inch... $24 00 
30 inch... 20 10 

Diseoants at present quoted ap- 
ply only to 1 and 2 inch meah net- 
tins. Other pHees hare been with- 
-drawn and are qnoted only on ap- 
tplleatlon. 

Toronto, London, Canadian net- 
ting 15% off list. 

Montreal, 15% oflf list. 

American netting, 10% oflf list. 
Per rod 

fnvinefble— 1840 $ 75 

1848 85 

f»60 95 

Put up in 10. 20 and 30-rod rolls. 
F.o.b. Montreal. 

OAKUM 

Best (American) $21 00 

U.S. Navy (unspun) 

Clipper (spun) 21 00 

■Clipper (unspun) 19 50 

U.S. Navy, Eng., (unspun) 

U.S. Navy, Eng., (spun) 

Plumbers (spun) ....$8 00 $10 50 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto 
OIL Montreal Toronto 

Royalite 19 6 18 

Palacine 22 21 

Gasoline, gal 34 33 

Black oil (Summer). 16 15 
Black oil (Winter) . . 18 15% 

Imperial Cylinder 66% 

Capital cylinder 50% 49% 

Machine oil, regular 

grades 25%-42 26%-36% 

Standard gas engine 

oil 38% 42% 

Paraffine 21 24 

XXX machine 24% 38% 

Fuel oil, bbls I4V2 13% 

Fuel oil, tank cars.. 13 12 
OLD MATERIALS 

See weekly report. 
PACKING Per lb. 

Fine jute $0 15 

Coarse jute 12 

Hemp 34 

Square braided hemp 38 

No. 1 Italian 44 

No. 2 Italian 36 

F.o.b. Montreal and Toronto. 
PAPER Per 400-ft. roll 

Dry Fibre, No. 1 roll 1 10 

Dry Fibre, No. 2 roll 59 

Anchor Brand 1 10 

Glaeed sheeting 69 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1 roll 1 25 

Tarred Fibre, No. 2, roll 72 

Surprise Fibre 66 

Tarred felt, per cwt 3.30-3.45 



Cyclone (dry) 1 lO | 

Cyclone (tarred) 1 25 

Joliet (dry fibre) 59 

Monarch Sheathing (per 

100 lbs.) 4 00 

Asbestos sheeting (per 100 

lbs.) 12 14 

Carpet Felt, 16 oz., per 

10 lbs $4 50 $5 50 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don, Montreal, freight equalized 
thereon. 
PICKS— 

Clay— 

5 to 6 lbs., doz $10 75 $11 80 

6 to 7 lbs., doz 11 50 12 60 

7 to 8 lbs., doz 12 25 13 50 

Rock— 

7 w 8 lbs., doz 12 25 

F.o.b. Montreal and Toronto. 
PINS, CLOTHES 

Per casa 

5 gross, 4-in. (loose) 95c-$1.10 

4 gross (cartons), 4%-in $1.00 

F.o.b. Montreal and Toronto. 

PIPE, STANDARD WROUGHT 

Effective Feb. 26, 1918. 

Black Galvanized 
Per 100 feet 
Standard Buttweld 

% in $ 6 00 $ 8 00 

% in 5 16 7 29 

% in 5 16 7 29 

% in 6 55 8 12 

% in 8 28 10 41 

1 in 12 24 15 39 

1% in 16 56 20 82 

1% in 19 80 24 89 

2 in 26 64 33 49 

2% in 42 72 53 53 

3 in 55 85 70 00 

3% in 70 84 87 86 

4 in 83 93 104 10 

Standard Lapweld. 

2 in 29 60 36 08 

2% in 44 46 54 70 

3 in 58 14 71 53 

3% in 72 68 90 62 

4 in 86 11 107 37 

4% in 97 79 122 66 

5 in 114 00 142 82 

6 in 147 80 185 28 

7 in 192 80 241 57 

8 L in 202 50 253 75 

8 in 233 30 292 32 

9 in 279 50 350 18 

10 L in 259 20 324 80 

10 in 333 70 418 18 

Terms 2% 80 days, approved 

credit. 
Prices — Ontario, Quebec and 
Maritime Provinces 

Wbile the foregoing prices on iron 
pipe are the nominal prices, it has 
been found in practice that prospec- 
tive buyers should ask for quota- 
tions on sizes 2% inches and larger 
on account of the shortage of these 
sizes and the extra difficulty of 
procuring supplies. 
WROUGHT NIPPLES 

4" and under, 45%. 

4%" and larger, 40%. 

4" and under, running thread 
26%. 

Standard couplings, 4' and un- 
der, 36%. 

4%" and larger, 15%. 

Terms 2% 80 days. Approved 
credit. Ontario, Quebec and Mari- 
time Provinces. 
PIPE (Condnctor) 

Plain List 

2 In., In 10-ft. lengths, list $8 00 

8 In., in 10-ft. lengths, list 9 70 
4 in.. In 10-ft. lengths, list 12 80 

6 In.. In 10-ft. lengths, list 17 50 
< In., in 10-ft. lengths, list 21 SO 

Discount 10%. 
F.o.b. Toronto. Ottawa, Oshawa 
PIPE, LEAD 

See weekly report 
PIPE (SOIL) 

Montreal Toronto 
% % 

Medium and extra 

heavy. 6" and under 35, 2% 30 

S" soil pipe 30 25 

Medium and extra 
Vipn^rv fittings. 6" 

and under 40, 2% 40 

PIPE (STOVE) 

See prioes under Wares, etc. 
PITCH 

Pine, black, per bbl 4 75 

Navy pitch, per bbl 6 50 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
POLISH (O-Cedar) 

4-oz. bottles, doz $ 3 00 

12-oz bottles, dos 6 00 



1-qt. can, doz 16 00 

%-gal. cans, doz 24 00 

1-gal. cans, doz 36 00 

Discount, 33 1-3 per cent. 

Liquid Veneer — 

4 oz., doz $2 00 

12 oz.. doz 4 00 

32 oz., doz 8 40 

64 oz., each 1 20 

128 oz., each 2 10 

F.o.b. Toronto, London. 
PUMPS 

Pumps, Well 

Cistern Pumps 

Set Lengths 

Brass Lined Cylinders 

Brass Body Cylinders 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 

London. 
RIVETS AND BURRS 

Iron rivets, blacked and tinned, 
25% ; Iron Burrs, 25%. 

Copper rivets, usual proportion 
of burrs, add 30% ; burrs, add 60%. 

Extras on Copper Rivets, %-lb. 
pkgs., Ic per lb. ; %-lb. pkgs., 2c 
lb. Coppered Rivets, net extras, 3c 
per lb. 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London. 
ROOFING Per square 

Samson, 1-ply, roll 1 90 

Samson, 2-ply, roll 2 50 

Samson, 3-ply, roll 3 10 

R. S. Special, 1-ply 1 25 

R. S. Special, 2-ply 1 60 

R. S. Special, 8-ply 1 76 

Amazon, 1-ply 1 95 

Amazon, 2-ply 2 25 

Amazon, 3-pIy 2 55 

Everlastic, 1-ply 1 65 

Everlastic, 2-ply 1 95 

Everlastic, 3-ply 2 25 

Good Luck, 1-ply 1 60 

Good Luck, 2-ply 1 80 

Good Luck, 3-pIy 2 10 

McCombe Sp., 1-ply 1 35 

McCombe Sp., 2-pIy 1 66 

McCombe Sp., S-ply 1 76 

Black Cat, 1-ply 1 86 

Black Cat, 2-ply 2 16 

Black Cat, 8-ply ! <6 

Black Diamond tarred felt. . . 3 30 
Black Diamond Ready Roofing, 

2 ply 1 12 

Black Diamond Ready Roofing, 

3 ply 1 08 

Liquid roofing cement, per gal. 

in barrels 27 

5 and 10 gal. Iota, per gal... 38 

Coal Tar, bbl $5.76-$6.00 

Roofing Pitch, $1.05 to $1.10 cwt. 
F.o.b. Toronto, London, Montresl. 
ROPE Lb. 

Pure Manila basis 39 

British Manila basis 33 

New Zealand hemp basis 33 

Sisal basis 27% 

Above quotations are basis prices 
% and larger diameter. The fol- 
lowing advances over basis are 
made for smaller sizes : — Smaller 
than ?4 and down to 7/16 dia. — Uc 
pbove basis : % dia., le above basis : 
Vt and 6/16 dia. l%c above basis: 
3/16 dia.. 2c above basis. 

Sinele lath yam basis 27% 

Double lath yarn 28 

Vnrht marline, tarred 67 

Halyards SO 

Hemp, deep sea line basis .... 60 
Hemp, tarred ratline basis. ... 4S ■ 
Hemp, tarred bolt rope basis. 46 

Marline and Houseline 46 

Italian rope basis.. On anplication 

Cotton. % in 73 77 

5-32 in 72 75Vo 

3-16 in 69 72V, 

Vi in. and up 68 71V. 

F.o.b. Toronto. Montreal. Brantford. 

London, Hamilton. 
SANDPAPER 

B. & A. sandpaper. 10% to 15% 
nn list. 
B. & A. emery cloth. 5% on list. 

B. Xr A. sandnnner in rolls. 3S 1-3 
ner cent, on list. F.o.b. Toronto. 

Mrintrenl. 

SCALES Scale Stamping 

ChaniTiion — List ffxtra 

4 lb $ 5 50 $0 20 

10 lb 7 50 30 

2'in lb 12 50 50 

fino lb 28 00 1 00 

1200 lb 35 00 1 00 

2000 lb. , 50 00 1 00 

2000 lb. Drop lever 57 00 1 00 

in. IV, WniigeboM . ."; 00 10 

25.1V. Hniisebold . fi 00 SO 

ChaniTiioTi li«t Tiri'-ea flllbiect t" » 

discount of 10% ; Standard scales. 



20% discount ; Weigh Beams, 10% 
discount. No discount allowed on 
stamping charge. F.o.b. Toronto, 
Montreal, Hamilton. 
SCYTHES Doa. 

Cast Steel tlS M 

(3olden Clipper 18 I* 

Little Giant 14 M 

Little Giant, Genoioe 16 M 

F.o.b. Toronto, London 
SNATHS Doz. 

00 Patent $12 50 

1 12 00 

2 11 50 

3 10 50 

SCREWS 

Discounts off Standard List adopted 
Aug. 1, 1908. 

Wood, F. H.. bright 78>4l 

Wood, R. H., bright 6T% 

Wood, O. H., bright 67% 

Wood, F. H., brass 8T% 

Wood, R. H., brass 88V^ 

Wood. O. H., brass 8SU 

Wood, F. H., bronaa 2t% 

Wood, R. H.. broiiM iS 

Wood. O. H.. broi^ae 86 

Square cap 20 

Hexagon cap 19 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamiltva, LaBden 
and Montreal. 

Wooden Bench Scrvw* 

Dozen 87 M 

SHEETS, BLACK 

See Montreal and Toronto report 
SHEETS, CORRUGATED 

See weekly report. 
SHEETS. GALVANIZED 

Premier Galvanized 

Per IM lbs. 

10% oz 19 26 

U.S. 28 8 M 

VJS. 26 « « 

22 and 24 « «♦ 

18 and 20 8 85 

16 « 2« 

14 » 1» 

F.o.b. Hamilton and Teionto. 

Colbome Crown — 16-2« gauK*, 
$12.56: 22-24 gauge, $12.76. S«- 
gauge, $13; 28 gauge, $13.26. Leas 
25c in cash lots. F.o.b. MontreaL 

Apollo Brand Montreal Toronto 

14 gauge $12 OB « 8 10 

16 gauge 12 06 8 20 

18-20 gauge 10 80 8 88 

22-24 gauge 10 46 8 SO 

26 gauge 8 88 

28 gauge • •• 

10% OZ3 11 •» • an 

Add 20c for less than ton lots. 
B.W. Queen's Fleor- Gorbato 
gauge Head do-Lb "b«Bt-b€Bt^ 

18 $12 65 $12 88 • 8 TO 

18-20 12 65 12 65 ( 86 

22-24 12 25 12 26 t OB 

26 12 26 12 25 I M 

28 13 00 18 00 88 

10% OZ 10 00 

Less 25c In ease lots. 

F-o.b. Montreal. 

SHINGI-ES '*"' " 

Standard galvanized $11 00 

Shipping weight, 99 Ibe 

Standard painted 8 50 

Shipping weight. «» Ibn. 
Discount 7%%. 
F.o.b. Toronto. Ottawa, Oshawa 
SIDING METAL 

Standard galvanized $9 25 

Standard painted T 30 

Discount 7%%. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa. 
Oshawa. 
SOLDERING COPPERS 

Base, 3-8 lbs., 64c lb. F.o.h. To- 
ronto and Hamilton. 
SOLDER. BAR 

See Weekly Report. 
STAPLES 

See Wire Products. 
STOVES 

Oil Burning Cooking Each 

Perfection 2-burner $12 75 

Perfection S-bumer 810 80 

Perfection 4-burner 21 00 

No. 22G oven for above stove* 6 00 
MeClary Glass Front Ove»i 

No. 70 4 25 

Detroit Glass Front Oven No. 

g5 4 50 

F.o.b. Sarnia. London, Toronto. 
Ottawa 
Oil Bnming Heaters. List 

No. .525 (125), each « 88 

No. 630 (130), each T »! 

No. 630 (230), each •« 

F.o.b. Toronto, Sarnia, London, 

Hamilton, Ottawa. 

Discount 25% off Mst. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



,71 




The Practical Value 
of Paint 



can be determined only by application- 
Its serviceability depends upon the ingredients that go 
into it. 

Therefore, what your customers get out of their paint is 
determined only by the quality inside the tin-or the repu- 
tation of the house that stands behind it. 

Both dealer and consumer have long since been educated to 
the fact that it pays to pay a little more for good paint especi- 
ally when such a paint returns this slight extra first cost by 
giving better and longer service. 

Never in the world's history has money been needed but 
wasted than right now. 

Why not sell paints that save it? 



R. C. Jamieson & Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL, CANADA 

Est'd. 1858 
Branches: CALGARY and VANCOUVER 
Owning and operating P. D. Dods & Co., Ltd 




The Jamieson Proposition 

is sure to interest you. 

Write for it. 



72 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



SPADES, SHOVELS AND SCOOPS 

1st Grade 2nd Grade 4th Gradt 

Plain Back Shovels and Spades 60% 50% 60% 

Draining Tools 60% 60% .... 

Hollow Back Scoops 50% 50% 

Sand Shovels 50% 50% 

Hollow Back Shovel* 50% 50% 

Hollow Back Coal Shovels 60% 60% 

Riveted Back Scoops 60% 60% 60% 

Miners' Spring Point Shovels 50% .... 

Above discounts apply whether goods are sold in carload or less 
than carloads. 

The above discounts apply only to Black List; Black List prices 
being as follows : 

BLACK LIST PRICES 
Plain Back Shovels and Spades.. $29.00 $28.00 $25.00 

Draining Tools, No. 2, black 29.00 27.50 

Hollow Back Scoops, No. 2, black. 34.50 32.00 

Coal Shovels, Hollow Back, No. 2, 

black 32.00 30.00 

Sand Shovels, No. 2, black 27.60 24.00 

Hollow Back Shovels, No. 2, black 27.50 24.00 

Riveted Back Scoops, No. 2 black 37.60 36.50 34.00 

Miners' Spring Point Shovel, No. 2, 

black 36.50 

NET EXTRAS— 

For each size larger than No. 2, add 25c dozen net. 

Full polished $1.00 per dozen net 

Half polished 50c per dozen net 

F.o.b. London, Hamilton, Toronto, Gananoque. Ottawa, Montreal, 
Quebec. Halifax, St. John, Moncton, and freight may be equalized 
thereon. 



SWEEPERS, CARPET Bissell's 
Doz. 
American Queen, Nickeled 
Fittings, Cyco Ball Bear- 
ing $43 00 

Boudoir. Nic, Cyco B.B 40 00 

Club, Jap. Cyco Bearing 96 00 

Champion, Nickeled Fittings 35 00 
Champion, Japanned Fittings 31 00 

Elite. Nic, Cyco B.B 46 00 

Grand, Nic. ,Cyco B.B 56 00 

Grand, Jap., Cyco B.B 52 00 

Grand Rapids, Nic, Cyco 

B.B 40 00 

Grand Rapids, Jap., Cyco B.B 36 00 
Parlor Queen, Nic, Cyco, 

B.B 46 00 

Princess, Nic, Cyco B.B... 41 00 
Standard, Nickeled Fittings 37 00 
Standard. Japanned Fittings 33 00 
Universal, Nic, Cyco Bear- 
ing 38 00 

Universal, Jap., Cyco Bear- 
ing 34 00 

SWEEPERS, VACUUM Bissell's 

Doz. 

Grand Rapids, Nic $84 00 

Household, Jap 72 GO 

Superba, Nic 99 00 

F.o.b. factory Niagara Falls. Ont., 
and other jobbing points in Eastern 
Canada. 
SWEEPERS (ELECTRIC) 

Steel frame 33 76 

Aluminum frame 41 25 

Attachments, set 7 50 

F.o.b Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
TACKS Discount 

Wire Tacks 69 and 10% 

Revised Hardware Tack 
List adopted Jan. 1, 

1916 60 and H^fV, 

Double pointed tacks.... 60 10% 
Shoe findings list adopted 
July 5, 1917— Net list. 
List of Capped Goods 
adopted Jan. 1. 1916.. 60 and \r,'-'. 
F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, Montreal. 

London. 
TINNERS' TRIMMINGS 

See prices under head of Wires. 
TOASTERS, ELECTRIC 

Upright, with rack $4 00 

TOOLS, HARVEST 

Waverly. Wellandvale. Rixford. 
Maple Leaf, Bedford, 17%% dis- 
count. Samson. 12%% discount. 
?.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. 

London. 
TROUGH (EAVE) 
O. G. Square bead and half round. 
Size in girth Per 100 ft. 

8 in $ 6 90 15 in $12 50 

10 in 7 70 18 in 16 00 

12 in 9 10 Discount 10%. 

F.o.b. Toronto. Oshawa. Ottawa 
TRAPS (GAME) Doz. with chain 

Victor, No. 1 2 20 

Jump, No. 1 2 95 

Hawley & Norton, No. 1 3 45 

Newhouse. No. 1 4 70 

F.o.b. Toronto, Ixjndon, Hamilton. 
Montreal. 
TWINE (BINDER) Pei b 

500 ft $0 23 V2 

550 ft 25% 

600 ft 26% 

650 It 28 

In 5-ton Iota ^e discount from 



above; 10 tons and upwards, Vic 
discount. Freight paid on 300 lbs. 
and over to nearest station. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Brant- 
ford, Hamilten, London 
TWINE (COTTON) 

3-ply wrapping, lb 69-72 

4-ply, wrapping, lb 73-76 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
WOOD TUBS 

No. 0, per dozen $19 80 

No. 1, per dozen 17 60 

No. 2, per dozen 15 40 

No. 3, per dozen 13 20 

F.o.b. Newmarket 
VALVES % 

Ground work 50 

Compression work, standard. . 52 

High grade 45 

Cushion work 46 

Fuller work, standard 60 

High grade 43 

Basin cocks. No. standard.. 46 

High grade 46 

Bath cocks 63 

Flatway stop and waste cocks, 

standard 53 

High grade 50 

Roundway Stop and Waste 

Cocks, standard .....* B3 

High grade 50 

Brass Steam Cocks, standard., net 
Radiator valves, standard.... 15 

High grade 7% 

Globe, angle and check valves, 

standard 10 

Do., high grade 7% 

Patent quick opening valves.. 35 

F.o.b. Toronto 
WARES, ETC. 
Scotch Grey Ware, 60, 5%. 
Colonial, 33 1-3%. 
Imperial Ware. 33 1-3%. 
Pearl. 33 1-3%. 
Premier, 10%. 
Canada Ware, 10%. 
Diamond. 10%. White Ware, 50%. 
Japanned Ware, list plus 20%. 
Japanned Wnre, White, list, plus 

30%. 
Plain and Jap Spiinklers, list plus 

20%. 
Stamped Ware, plain, 50%. 
Stamped Ware, retinned. 45%. 
Copper Bottoms, list, plus 10%. 
Tinners' Trimmings, plain, 60%. 
Tinners' Trimmings, retinned. 45"^'. 
Tinners' Trimmings, general, list 

plus 10%. 
Factory Milk Cans, list plus 50%. 
Milk Can Trimmings, list, plus 

60%. 
Cream Cans, list .plus 25%. 
Railroad Cans, list, plus 20%. 
Pieced Tinware, C.B., list, plus 

50%,. 
Sheet Iron Ware. list, plus 10%. 
Pieced Ware, ordinary, list, plus 

30%. Fry Pans. 40 and 10%. 

Spiders, steel. 10% ; cast iron, 

i7y2%. 

Fire Shovels. Japanned, list, plus 

10%. 

Steel Sinks, painted, list, plus 10%. 

Steel Sinks, galvanized, list phis 

15«!'^. 
Light Galv. Pails and Tubs, list 

plus 20%. 



Heavy Galv. Pails and Tub&. list. 

plus 10%. 
Garbage Pails, list, plus 10%. 
Jap. Coal Hods, list, plus 25%. 
Galv. Coal Hods, list, plus 40%. 
Paper Lined Boards, 40 and 6%. 
Wood Lined Boards, 30 and 10%. 
Stove Pipe, patent, per 100, 6 in., 

$20.36; 7 in., $21.83. 
Common, made-up, per 100, 6 and 6 

in., $21.00; 7 in., $23.00. 
Polished, made-up, per 100, 5 and 

6 in., $23.00; 7in., $25.00. 
Stove Pipe Thimbles, 60, 10%. 
Copper Boilers, list, plus 10%. 
Copper Tea Kettles, list, plus 10%. 
Copper Tea Kettles, 3 doz. lots, list. 

plus 10%, less 10%. 
Copper Tea and Coffee Pots. list. 

plus 10%. 
Copper Tea and Coffee Pots, in 3 

doz. lots, list, plus 10%. less 10%. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London, 
Hamilton. 

WASHERS. IRON 

Full box, 10% on list. Net prices 
per 100 lbs.: % in., $21.80; 5-16 in., 
$18.50; % in.. $16.30; 7-16 in.. 
$13.55; Vz in., $13; 9-16 in.. $12.15: 
% in., $11.70; 11-16 in.. $11: 13-16 
in., $11.70; 16-16, $11.70; 17-16 in., 
$11.70; 60 lbs. of one size, $2 per 
100 lbs. less. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London 
WEIGHTS. SASH 

Tor'to Lond'n Mont'l 
Sectional, 1 lb. 

per 100 lbs. ..$5 50 $5 50 $5 35 
Section. % m. 

per 100 lbs.. . 5 50 5 50 5 50 
Solid. 3 to 30 

lb?., per cwt.. 3 90 4 00 4 00 

WHEELBARROWS 

Navvy, steel wheel, doz. .37.50-51.50 
Garden steel wheel, doz. 51.00-75.00 

Light garden, doz 37.00-54.00 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. London. 
WIRE PRODUCTS 
F.o.b. Toronto. London. Hamilton. 

Montreal 
Cut Hay Baling Wire Per 100 Ihs 

No. 9 $6 60 

No. 10 6 65 

No. 11 6 70 

No. 12 6 85 

No. 13 6 95 

No. 13% 6 95 

No. 14 7 1.C 

No. 15 7 35 

Stovepipe Wire 

No. 18 8 25 

No. 19 8 75 

Hay Wire in Coils 

No. 13 6 80 

No. 14 6 90 

No. 15 7 05 

No. 16 7 20 

Smooth Steel Wire. 
Nos. 0-9 gauge, base 6 25 

Extras over base sizes on smaller 
gauges are as follows : 

No. 10. 6c extra: No. 11. 12c; No. 
12. 30c; No. 13. 30c: No. 14. 40c: 
No. 15. 55c; No. 16. 70c extra. 

Extra net per 100 lbs.— Oiled wire 
10c ; spring wire. $2.50 : bright, soft 
drawn. 15c : charcoal (extra quali 
ty), $1.25; packed in casks or cases 
15c; bagging and paperings, 10c: 
50 and lOO-lb. coils, in 25-1b. coils 
15c; in 5 and 10-lb. coils, 25c; in 
1-lb. coils. 50e ; in %-Ib. coils, 75c : 
in %-lb. coils, $1. 

Fine Steel Wire 

List Price on Fine Steel Wire 

No. 17 $5 00 No. 26 $ 9 50 

No. 18 5 50 No. 27 10 00 

No. 19 6 00 No. 28 11 00 

No. 20 6 65 No. 29 12 GO 

No. 21 7 00 No. 30 13 Of' 

No. 22 7 30 No. 31 14 00 

No. 23 7 65 No. 32 15 00 

No. 24 8 00 No. 33 16 00 

No. 25 9 00 No. 34 17 00 

For prices of fine steel wire add 
45% to above list. 

Extra net 

List of extras in 100-lb. lots, net 

Tinned wire, Nos. 17-25 $3 00 

Nos. 26-31 5 on 

Nos. 32-34 7 00 

Coppered 7.=; 

Oiling 10 

In 25-lb. bundles 15 

In 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25 

In 1-lb. hanks 25 

In %-lb. hanks 28 

In Vl-Ib. hanks 50 

Packed in casks or e.nses.... IF 
Bagging or papering 16 



No. 
No. 
No. 



Oiled and Annealed Wire 

10 $6 45 



11 
12 



6 47 
6 55 



Wire Bale Ties 

No. 12 $ 75 

No. 13 

No. 13% 



No. 14 



6 85 

6 90 

7 00 



No. 16 7 20 

No. 16 7 45 

Fenrp Wir. 

Barb $6.25-$6.50 

No. 9 pi. glav 5.35-6.00 

No. 12 pi. galv .5. .50- 6.15 

No 13 pi. galv 6.00-6.25 

No. 9 coil sp 5.50- 6.00 

No. 12 coil sp 5.80- 6.25 

Quotations are at times made on 
wire at lower figures than the gen- 
eral market by Jobbers having large 
stocks to dispose of. 

Fence Staples 

Fence staples, bright $6 60 

Fence staples, galvanized. $6.26-6.50 

In 25-lb. boxes add 25c extra 
Poultry Netting Staples 
Poultry netting staples, gal- 
vanized, list $12 00 

Less discount of 12%%. 

Bright poultry netting staples 
$1.10 less than galvanized after dis- 
count has been made. 

Copper and Brass Wire 

Copper wire list, plus 10% 

Brass wire, 3 to 24 gauge, add 40% 

25 to 36 gauge, add 25% 

Wire Cloth 
Black Fly Screen Cloth, per 

100 so. ft. in lOO^ft. rolls... $3 60 

In 50-ft. rolls 3 55 

Galvanized, per 100 sq. ft. in 

100 ft. rolls 4 76 6 BO 

Bronze, sq. ft 14 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
Wire Goods 

Discounts apply to list adopted 
Nov. 20, 1916. 
Bright Screw Eyes Suits, 

A.B.C.M 82%% 

Bright Iron Gate Hooks and 

eyes 82%% 

Bright square cornered 

screw hooks, and stove 

pipe eyes 82%% 

Brass, screw eyes suits, 

A.B.C 70% 

Brass Screw Hooks 70% 

Brass Gate Hooks and eyes 70% 

F.o.b. Toronto, Montreal, London. 
Hamilton. 
WRINGERS 
Royal Can., 11 in., doz. list $84 72 

Eze, 11 in., per doz 91 80 

Trojan, 12 inch 185 00 

Favorite 511E 105 80 

Unexcelled, 1041E 129 60 

Easy Work 90 50 

Challenge, 3111E 94 30 

Gem, 141E 91 80 

Sunlight, lllE 82 80 

Ottawa, 341E 103 80 

Empire, 11 in 98 80 

Superior, '11 in 84 80 

Majestic, 11 in 88 OC 

Perfect, 11 in 97 50 

Bicycle, 11 in 103 30 

Daisy, No. 2 114 72 

Daisy, No. 1 106 84 

Maple Leaf No. 2 103 20 

Maple Leaf No. 1 94 32 

Sun 78 90 

Rapid 82 80 

Universal 63 00 

Eureka, 10 in 65 00 

Eureka, 11 in 71 00 

Eclipse 97 70 

Discount off above list, 30% and 
10%. 

Freight equalized on shipments of 
14 doz. and upwards on Montreal 
"Toronto. Kingston. Hamilton, Lon- 
don, St. Mary's. 

For zinc products and zinc sheets 
f5eo weekly report. 
WRENCHES 



Trimn — 


Dor., net 




Doz. net 


R in.. 


..$15 60 


18 in... 


..$35 00 


10 in... 


.. 17 40 


24 in... 


. . 50 60 


14 in.. 


.. 24 25 






Goes— 


Doz. net 




Doz. net 


6 in.. 


..$13 00 


15 in.. 


..$S1 20 


8 in. . 


. . 15 fiO 


1* in.. 


.. 41 60 


10 in.. 


. . 1« 20 


21 in.. 


. . 50 70 


12 in.. 


. . 23 40 






Stillson- 


_ 


Each 


Doz. net 


6 in. 




. $1 20 


$14 00 


Sin. 




. 1 35 


15 60 


10 in 




. 1 50 


17 40 


14 in 




. 2 10 


24 45 


18 in. 




. 3 00 
. . 4 35 


35 00 


24 in. 




50 60 


36 in. 






94 20 


48 in. 




/.I — ." V • 


139 20 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



73 




PLATE A21D 



W-'^NTED, AT ONCE — CAPABLE HARD- 
ware man to manage retail hardware 
business In thriving Ontario town. State ex- 
perience, salary expected, and give references. 
Apply Box 182, Hardware and Metal. 



EMPIRE CLOSETS 

Every Merchant Plumber is interested 
in seeing his customer get the best that 
the market affords. 

It means better profits and satisfied 
customers. 

Empire Vitreous China Closet Com- 
binations are durable, neat in appear- 
ance and silent in operation. 

Oak and Vitro Closet Outfits carried 
in stock. 

We can make prompt shipment of all 
lines of plumbing and heating ma- 
terial. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Limited 



London 



Toronto 



Men who are capable of managing a retail 
hardware business are not easy to find. The 
position requires a high type of ability. 
Above all, it requires a man who recognizes 
opportunities and who knows how to make 
the most of them. That type of man in the 
hardware business is almost invariably a 
reader of Hardware and Metal. There 
were fifteen replies to the advertisement 
shown here. It was a point in favor of all 
the applicants that they were in the habit of 
reading Hardware and Metal. 



USE THE WANT AD PAGE 



74 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass, Etc. 



ALABASTINE 

Colors and white — 2%-lb. pack- 
ages, $8.60 for 100 lbs. ; 5-lb. pack- 
ages, $8.40 for 100 lbs. F.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, London. 
BEESWAX Per IK 

Small quantities $0 45 

Larger quantitiae 40 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
BLUE STONE Montreal Toronto 

Per lb 18-14 14-lS 

BRONZING LIQUID 
Bronzing; liquid. No. l.tl.6»-$2.00 

Banana oil. gal 3.60- 7.00 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
BRUSHES 

Acme, 15 lbs. each $2 25 

Acme, 20 lbs., each 2 75 

Acme, 25 lbs. each 3 25 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
COATING 

Cement Ooatinc IS 00 $S Tt 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
COLORS (DRY) Per lb. 

Raw Umber, No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure, 100-lb, kegs 15 

Burnt Umber, No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure, 100-lb. kegs 15 

Raw Sienna, No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure, 100-lb. kegs 15 

Burnt Sienna, No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure, 100-lb. kegs 15 

Imp. green, 100 lb. kegs 25 

Chrome green, pure SB 

Chrome yellow 17-31 

Brunswick green, 100 lb. k.. 12 

Indian rr<l, 100-lb. kegi 15 

Indian red. No. 1, 100 lb. k.. 06 
Venetian red, best bright. . . 04 

Venetian red. No. 1 02% 

Drop black, pure dry 16 

Golden oehre, 100 lb. kegs.. 06^4 
White ochre, 100 lb. kegs.. 04 

White ochre, barrels OS 

Yellow ochre, barrels 03% 

French ochre, barrels 06 

Spruce ochre, 100-lb. kegs... 7-8c 
Canadian red oxide, bbls....2 -2^ 

Super magnetic red 2l4-2%c 

Vermilion 40 

English vermilion 2 50 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. 
COLORS IN OIL, PURE 
1 lb. tins — 

Venetian red 16 

Indian red 30 

Chrome yellow, pure 53 

Golden ochre, pure 30-32 

French spruce ochre, pure.... 18 

Chrome green, pure 24-23 

French permanent green, pure 28 

Signwriters' black, pure 33 

Lampblack 33 

Marine black, 5 lb. irons 20 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
ENAMELS (White) Gal. 

Ouralite 6 50 

AKyagloss 6 06 

GLUE Per lb. 

Brantford All Round Glue — 

Case No. 7— 50-lb. pkgs $28 00 

Case No. 8—100 %-lb. pkgs.. 31 00 
Case No. 9—200 %-lb. pkgs.. 38 00 

Discount. 
French medal (prices withdrawn) 

English common sheet 32-34 

English prima 35-38 

White pigsfoot 50 

Cake bone, 112-lb. bags 35 

Hide. 112-Ib. bags 45 

Gelatine, 112-lb. bags 45-60 

Ground gluea, 112-lb. bags. 

No. 1 28-30 

Oround glne. No. 2, 112-lb. 

bags 22-24 

Do.. No. 3, less than bags . . 24 

GLASS Single Double 

Per 100 ft. Thick ThicV 

Under 25 $16 80 $22 90 

86 to 84 17 60 24 85 

SB to 40 18 35 26 40 

41 to BO 23 50 30 00 

gl te «» 24 60 30 80 

61 to 70 26 50 32 70 

Tl to SO 29 70 36 40 

81 to 85 45 45 

Rfi to SO 48 85 

• 1 to 94 49 80 



95 to 100 58 55 

101 to 105 65 35 

106 to 110 73 10 

Discount box glass, 25%. 
Cut lights, 5%. Cash 2%. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London, 

Hamilton. 
GLASS, PLATE Sq. foot 

Plates up to 1 foot, each $0 80 

Plates from 1 to 2 feet, each 90 

2 to 3 " 95 

3 to 4 " 1 15 

4 to 5 " 1 35 

5 to 7 " 1 50 
7 to 10 " 1 70 

10 to 12 " 1 75 
12 to 15 " 1 85 
15 to 25 " 1 95 
25 to 50 " 2 15 
50 to 75 " 2 20 
75 to 90 " 2 25 
90 to 100 " 2 30 
100 to 120 " 2 60 
120 to 140 " 2 90 
Plates 101 to 110 wide contain- 
ing not over 100 ft. each... 3 00 
Plates 111 to 120 wide contain- 
ing not over 100 ft., each... 3 40 
Plates 101 to 110 wide contain- 
ing over 100 ft., each 3 40 

Plates 111 to 120 wide contain- 
ing over 100 ft., each 3 75 

Trade Discount, 25%. 
City deliveries, 33 1/3%. 
Montreal. London, Hamilton, To- 
ronto, Kitchener. 
GLAZIERS' POINTS 

Zinc coated, $1.66-$1.62 per doz. 
packages 6 lbs. gross. 

Zinc, pure, prices withdrawn. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
LEAD, WHITE (Ground in oil.) 
Prices are per 100 lbs. in ton lots. 
Less than ton lots are 35c per 
100 lbs. higher than nuoted be- 
low. F.o.b. Ottawa, 15c advance 
per 100 lbs. F.o.b. London and 
Windsor, 30c per 100 lbs. F.o.b. 
Toronto and Hamilton, 25c per 
100 !bs. F.o.b. Fort William and 
Poi-t Arthur, 40c per 100 lbs. 
Maritime differential 30c per 100 lbs. 
over Montreal. 

Montreal Toronto 

Anchor, Pure $17 00 $17 25 

Crown Diamond 17 00 17 25 

Crown, pure 17 00 17 25 

Green Seal 17 00 17 25 

Ramsay's Pure 17 00 17 2.S 

Mooi-e's Pure 17 00 17 25 

Tiger, Pure 17 00 17 25 

O.P.W. Dec. Pure. . . 17 00 17 25 

Red .Sef.i 17 00 17 25 

Decorators' Pure ... 17 00 17 25 

O.P.W. English 17 20 17 ir> 

Elephant Genuine . . 17 50 17 75 
R.B. Genuine T.ead. less than 
tons, $19.15 Toronto; $18.90 Mont- 
real. Ton lots 5% off ; five-ton lots 
10% off. 

LEAD (RED DRY) 
Genuine, 560-pound 

casks, per cwt $14 00 $14 50 

Genuine. 100-pound 

kegs, per cwt 14 75 15 50 

Less quantity 16 00 17 00 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. 
LEAD, ARSENATE Dry, Paste. 

Pound Pound 

Barrels, 600 lbs 24y2 

Half bbls., 300 lbs 24% 

100s 45 25 

50s 45% 25% 

25s 46 26 

10s 47% 

6s 49% 29% 

2s 31 

Is 52 32% 

F.o.b. Toronto. Montreal and 
Hamilton 
MURESCO 

Tints, 5-Ib. packages, per 100 lbs., 
$8.40 : white, 5-lb. packages, $7.80. 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
LINSEED OIL 

For prices see weekly report. 
PAINTS. PREPARED 

Price per gallon 

Elephant, white S 70 

Elephant, colors 3 45 

B.H. English, white 3 80 



B.H. English, colors 3 70 

B.H. Floor 3 05 

B.H. Porch Floor 3 70 

Minerva, white 3 60 

Minerva, colors 3 40 

Crown Diamond, white 3 55 

Crown Diamond, colors 3 45 

Crown Diamond, floor 2 95 

B.H. Fresconette, white 3 35 

B.H. Fresconette, colors 3 25 

Moore's House Colors, white.. 3 50 
Moore's House Colors, colors. 3 40 
Moore's Egyptian Paint, all 

colors 2 75 

Moore's Floor Paint 2 90 

Moore's Sani-FIat 8 00 

Jamieson's Crown Anchor. ... 3 30 

C.P.C. Pure, white 3 80 

C.P.C. Pure, colors 3 70 

O.P.W. Canada Brand, white 3 70 
O.P.W. Canada Brand, colors 3 40 
O.P.W. Canada Brand, floor. 2 9b 

O.P.W. Flat Wall, white 3 20 

O.P.W. Flat Wall, colors 3 00 

Ramsay's Pure, white 3 65 

Ramsay's Pure, colors 3 35 

Martin-Senour, 100%, white. . 3 80 
Martin-Senour, 100%, colors. 3 70 
Martin-Senour, Porch Paint. . . 3 70 
Martin-Senour, Neutone, white 3 35 
Martin-Senour, Neutone, colors 3 25 

Senour's Floor Paint 3 15 

Sherwin-Williams, white 3 80 

Sherwin-Williams, colors 3 70 

Flat Tone, white 3 35 

Flat Tone, colors 3 25 

Lowe Bros. H.S., white 3 80 

Lowe Bros. H.S., colors 3 70 

Mellotone, white 3 50 

Mellotone, colors 3 35 

Sanitone, white 3 35 

Maple Leaf, white 3 80 

Maple Leaf, colors 3 70 

Maple Leaf, floor 3 15 

Maple Leaf, flat wall 3 25 

Pearcy's Prepared, colors .... 3 15 
Pearcy's Prepared, white .... 3 50 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
PARIS GREES* C.P. Berger's 

and Munro's 
Per lb. 
In barrels, about 600 

lbs 60% 61 

In arsenic wegs, 250 
In 50 lb. and 100 

lb. drums 61% 62 

In 25 lb. drums 62% 68 

In 1 lb. packets, 100 

lbs. in case 64% 9 65 

In % lb. packets, 100 

lbs. in case 66% 67 

In 1 lb. tins, 100 lbs. 

in case 66% 67 

Above prices f.o.b. Montreal, Que- 
bec, Moncton, St. John and Hali- 
fax. Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Yarmouth and P.E.I, are %e per 
lb. higher. Terms one month net 
or 1% in 15 days. 

Standard 
Less than tons 
PUTTY Montreal Toronto 

Bulk, in casks $4 35 4 70 

Bulk, 100-lb, drums 5 20 5 4.5-5 55 
Bulk 2^-lb. drums. 5 20 5 55 

Bulk. :2i/2-lb. irons 5 20 5 80 

Bladder, in bbls. . . 5 20 5 80 

Ton lots standard are 20c per 
b""dred pounds less. 

Pure Putty. $2 cwt. advance. 
London and Hamilton prices same 
as Toronto. 
SHELLAC 

Pure White, gal.. $4 40-$4 90 
Pure Orange, gal. . 4 15- 4 50 
Gum Shellac. TN. 74-76c lb . ; fin- 
est orange. 79-95c : bone dry white, 
82-85C F.o.b. Toronto, London. 

PAINT AND VARNISH 
REMOVER 

Taxite. 1 gal. cans 3 00 

B.H. Vanisher $2 75 

CumoflF 3 00 

Takof 3 25 

O.P.W. Presto 8 00 

Lingerwett 2 80-3 25 

Solvo 3 00 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
TURPENTINE 

See weekly report elsewhere in 
this issue for prices. 



SLATING QaL 

Liquid Slating, B.B $2 20 

VARNISHES Per gal. eans 

No. 1 Furniture, extra, bar- 
rels, $1.10-$1.21 gal.; gal. 

tins $1.32-»1.4» 

B.H. Stovepipe Vamiah. H 

pints, per dozen 1 64 

Depend-on, list : S St 

B.H. Maritime Spar, list 7 90 

Everlastic, Depend-on and Maritime 
Spar subject to discount of 40%. 

Elastilite 2 90 

Graniline Floor Finish 2 90 

Hydrox Spar S M 

Sun Varnish 2 60 

Sun Sp.ir 4 63 

Sun Waterproof Floor 3 40 

Jasperite Interior and Ex- 
terior 2 66 

Jasperite Pale Hard Oil . . . 19* 
Jasperite Indestrueto Floor 

Fmish 2 H 

Jamieson's <Copaline 8 9t 

M-S Marl3lc-Ite Floor S It 

MjS Wood-Var 8 S9 

M-S Double Spar 4 W 

M-S Finest Interior ........ S M 

Elastic Interior S (4 

Mar-not 8 11 

Quick Action House > 4T 

Rexspar 4U 

Sear-Not 8 M 

Kyanize Spar 4 9( 

Kyanize Cabinet Rubbing . . 8 M 

Kyanize Interior 8 U 

Luxeberry light 8 M 

Luxeberry granite til 

Luxeberry spar 4IC 

Ramsay's Universal t M 

F.o.b. Montreal. Torontow 
WATER PAINTS 

Opalite, 300 lb. bbls 1$% 

Opalite, 100 lb. kegs 14 

1 gal. packages, per pkg... 7B 
% gal. package, per pkg... 40 
Coralite, 6-lb. pkgs., white 07 
Coralite, 5-lb. pkgs., colors 07% 
B.H. Frescotn, 6 lbs. white, 

$6.50 ; colors T Ot 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
WASTE 

Cream, Polishing $0 21 

WHITE 

XXX 20 

XX 18 

X 17 

XC 16 

Japanese 15 

XXX Extra • «1 

X Grand 1*% 

XLCR 18% 

X Empire • JT* 

X Press • 18 

COLORED 

No. 5 15 

No. 1 1* 

No. 7 13 , 

No. lA 11% 

No. IB 10% 

Fancy JJVl 

Lion j; 

Standard J'% 

Popular 1* 

Keen ^ 10^4 

Above lines subject to trade dis- 
count for quantity. 
WAX Per lb. 

C. & B. Floor Wax $0 35 

B.H. Wax 86 

Ronuk Floor Wax. lb 88 

Berry Bros 84 

Imperial Floor Wax 40 

Anchor 38 

O.P.W. Lion Brand 85 

Old English 53 

Johnsons 57 

Jamieson's liquid wax, gal... 2 75 

Gold Medal 44 

Edwar-,1s, lb 40 

Ramsay's SO 

S. & W *o 

Fob. Montreal and Toronto. 
WHITING 

Plain, in bbls 82 81 

F.o.b Montreal. Toronto. London. 

Gilders, bolted, in bbls 8 00 

WOOD ALCOHOL . per gal. 

In five gallons $1.80-$1.90 

In barrels - l-'* 

S4 extra for barrels 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



75 



<^ 



F' 



Extend Your Paint Business 

A growing appreciation of the protective value of paint has 
been fully shown this year by property owners who realiz- 
ed that it was no longer economy nor an advantage to 
put off painting. Thousands of homes and build- 
ings are still in need of painting. 

MAPLE LEAP 
PAINT 

Is an excellent business extender 
where quality, las.ing proper- 
ties, and full measure pro 
tective value is sourht. 



PAINT POINTERi^ 

FROM 

JHE OLD TIME 
PAINTER' 



.»» 



'AH* AiiAr 



RED 



S 



BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 




GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



THE TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

DON ROADWAY TORONTO 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS 



ESTABLISHED 1863 

Twelve Medals of 

Award at 

INTERNATIONAL 

Expositions. 




INCORPORATED 1S95 

Special Grind 

Prize 

GOLD MEDAL 

Atlanta, 1895. 



Copy of Catalog^ue w^ill be sent free to any interacted File User upon application. 

G. & H. BARNETT COMPANY .... PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Owned and operated by Nicholson File Co. 



76 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



Winnipeg Hardware Quotations 



AMMUNITION 

Powder, per kcK, $11.00. 

Shot. soft, per cwt., $17.20; chill- 
ed, $18.70; buckshot, $18.00; ball. 
$18.40. 

Dominion Mctellics— B.B. Caps, 
12.80: C'.B. OapB, $3.50; 22 Short 
Blaek or Lesmok. $4: 22 Long 
Black or Lesmok, «4.80 ; 22 Short 
Smokeless. $4.30 ; 22 Ix.ng Smoke- 
less. «6; 22 Long Bifle Black, $5.60, 
22 Long Rifle Smokeless, $7 per M. 
net. Center Fire Pistol, 22%; Cen- 
ter Fire Sporting, 25% off Ameri- 
can list. 

American Metallics— B.B. Caps. 
$3.08: C.B. Caps. $3.85; 22 Short 
Black, $4.»6; 22 Long Black, $5.25; 
22 Long Bifle Black, $7.70 : 22 Short 
Smokeless. $4.69; 22 Long Smoke- 
less «6.B5; 22 Long Bifle Smoke, 
$7.65 per M. net. Center Fire Pis- 
tol, 10?t on list; Center Fire 
Sporting, 19% on list. 

Loaded Shells— XJrown Black Pow- 
der 12 ga., $81; Sovereign Smoke- 
less, 12 ga., $38: Regal Smokeless, 
12 ga., $38: Nitro Club Smokeless, 
12 ga.. $41; Canuck Smokeless, 12 
ga $41 per M. net. Empty Paper 
Shot Shells, $14 per M. ; Empty 
Brass Shot Shells, $6.65 per 100. 

ANVILS 

Peter Wright, 80 lbs. and up, 24c 
per lb.: clip horn, 2Bc lb. 

Norris, 80 lbs. and over, 16c. 

AXES 

Single Bit $14 50 $20 00 

Double Bit 16 50 21 50 

Broad axes 32 00 35 00 

AUGER BITS 

Standai-d List Prices per Dozen 

i/16 $6 00 18/16 $12 00 

4 6 00 19 14 00 

5 5 00 20 14 00 

6 5 00 21 16 00 

7 5 00 22 16 00 

g 5 00 23 18 00 

g « 00 24 18 00 

10 « 00 25 21 00 

11 7 00 26 21 00 

12 7 00 27 24 00 

18 8 25 28 24 00 

14 8 25 29 27 00 

IB 9 60 30 27 00 

16 9 60 31 30 00 

I- 12 00 82 30 00 

Discounts from standard list prices 

Irwin 10% 

Gilmour 45% 

BARS. CROW. $10.25 per 100 lbs. 

BAR IRON 

Bar iron.— $5.50 base ; Swedish 
iron. $5.25; sleigh shoe steel, $5.80; 
spring steel, $6.50; machinery steel, 
$8.00 ; tool steel, octagon, 100 lbs., 
$13. 

BELTING 

Rubber, 6 in. and under, 25- 
2y2% ; over 6 in., 20%. 

Agricultural or No. 1 leather 
belting, 47%% off list. 

Standard. 80, 10 and 5% off list. 

The "dooble" list is just twice 
tiie price of "single." 

BELT LACING 

In aiOcs. tanned. $1.66 per lb.; 
eut, $l.t8 per lb.; rawhide, sides, 
$1.60: cut tl.ro. 

Blue Stone (Vttrol), 12c lb. 



BOLTS 

Carriage, % and smaller, 5% ; 
7-16 and larger, 6% on list ; ma- 
chine, % and under, 6% ; 7-16 and 
over, 6% on list; machine set 
screws, 26% ; plough bolts, 6% on 
list ; stove bolts, 60% ; shaft belts, 
B% on list ; tire bolts, 25% ; sleigh 
shoe bolts to % and smaller, 5% on 
list; 7-16 and up, 5% on list. 

BORAX. Borax, per lb.. 14c. 
BUILDING PAPER 

Tarred, $1.10 to $1.60 per roll, 
according to quality ; plain, 80c to 
$1.45. 

BUTTS 

Plated — No. '.£41 Antique Copper 
and Dull Brass Finish 

Per pr. 

2^5X2% in 35 

3x3 in 37 

3%x3% in 38 

4x4 in 47 

41/2x4% in 68 

5 X S in 80 

Wrought Steel — 

No. 840 Net list 

No. 800 5% on list 

No. 838 Net list 

No. 804 5% off list 

CHAIN 

Coil, 3-16 ir>., $18.40: %, $16.00; 
5-16 in., $13.60: %, $12.40; 7-16, 
$12.20; V^, $12.00: 9-16, $12.00; %, 
$11.75: %. $11.50; 1 in,. $11.25: 
Logging, 5-16 in., $15.40: %, 
$14.20; 1/2, $13.80; tie-out. 47%%. 

CHURNS 

Barrel, No. 0. $7.20 ; No. 1. $7.20 ; 
No. 2, $8; No. 3. $8.80; No. 4. 
$10.40 each. 

CLEVISES. MALL. 16c per lb. 

CLOCKS— Alarm 

Each 

Big Ben $2 90 

Baby Ben 2 90 

America 1 25 

Lookout 1 60 

Sleepmeter 1 65 

COPPER 

Sheet and planished copper. 75c 
per lb. Tinned. 60e. 

CORD SASH 

Coils or Hanks 
8, 9, 10 72c lb. 

DRILLS 

Bit stock. 35% ; Blacksmith. % 
in. round shank. 20%. 

EAVETROUGH 

Eavetrough, per 100 ft., 8 in., 
$6.50; 10 in., $7.20; 12 in., $8.45. 

Conductor pipe, 2 in., per 100 ft., 
$7.65; 3 in.. $9.16; 4 in.. $12.05. 

ENAMELWARE 

See Wares. 

FILES 

Globe Discount 45% 

Nicholson Gen. ..,. .Discount 30% 

FITTINGS 

Malleable Black Galv. 

Class B $ 27 $ 38 

Class C 17% 27 

Bushings 20% 

Unions 30% 

Nipples 4" and un- 
der 45% 

FORMALDEHYDE 

400-lb. bbls., 29c lb. ; 200-lb. bar- 
rels, 30c lb. : 100-lb. barrels, 81c 
lb. ; 10-lb. jugs, $3.40 each ; 6-lb. 
jugs, $1.90 each ; 2-lb. jugs, 90c 
each. 
GALVANIZED WARE 

See Wares. 



GLASS, WINDOW Single Double 

Up to 25 in $13 50 $18 50 

26 to 40 14 50 21 00 

41 to 60 18 50 23 75 

51 to 60 19 60 24 25 

61 to 70 20 50 25 75 

GLASS (Plato 

Net list. 

GLOBES— LANTERN 

Doz. 

Short Pattern $1 10 

Cold Blast, regular 1 00 

GRINDSTONES 

Per 100 lbs., $2.75. 

Mounted on steel frames, $5.00 to 
$6.75. 

HARVEST TOOLS. 25%. 

HINGES 

Light T and strap, 10%. 

Corrugated Strap Hinges — 4, 
$1.70; 6. $$2.10; 6. $2.85; 8, $4.60; 
10, $7; 12, $10.76. 

Corrugated Tee Hinges— 4, $1.90; 
6, $2.56; 6, $3.26; 8. $6.65; 10. 
$8.T5; 12, $12.40. 

HORSI';8HOES 

Iron, No. to 1, $7.35 ; No. 2 
and larger, $7.10; snowshoes. No. 
to No. 1, $7.60; No. 2 and larger, 
$7.35; steel. No. to 1. $7.80; No. 
2 and larger, $7.65; featherweight, 
$8.95. 

Apollo and 

IRON, GALVANIZED "Fleur 

Premier de Lis" 

10% oz. or 28 Eng...$ll 70 $11 70 
28 Am. or 26 Eng.. . 11 40 11 40 
2G Am. or 26 special 11 10 11 10 

24 10 95 10 'J5 

22 10 95 10 95 

13 and 20 10 80 10 8C 

16 Am 10 65 10 60 

IRONS. SAD 

Common Sad Irons, 8 lbs., lie 

per lb. ; 4 lbs., 14c per lb. 

Mrs. Pott's No. 55, set $2 10 

Mrs. Pott's No. 50, set 2 25 

Mrs. Pott's common sad iron 
handles. $1.60 dozen. Mrs. Pott's 
improved, $2.10 a dozen. 

JACK8CREW8 
10% off list. 

KNIVES— HAY 

Doz. 

Heath's $12 50 

Lightning 12 50 

LAMP CHIMNEYS 

A. per case 8 doz.. $7.80 per doz.. 
$1.05 ; B, per case 6 doz., $6.50 ; per 
doz., $1.15. 

LANTERNS 

No. 2, plain $13 00 

No. 25. Dash-board 17 50 

Short Globe, doz 13 00 

LEAD PIPE. $14.40. 
LEAD WASTE, $15.40. 

LATCHES— THUMB. STEEL 

Doz. 

2 $2 10 

3 2 80 

4 4 90 

Barn Door 

5 2 80 

8 3 00 

9 6 20 

LINSEED OIL 
See weekly report. 



MACHINES— WASHING 

Each 

Do ws well $ 6 go 

New Century B 10 16 

New Idea 11 86 

Snowball 9 00 

MATTOCKS 

Pick, $11; cutter, $11. 

MOPS 

Doz. 

O'Cedar Polish, No. 1 $12 00 

O'Cedar Polish, No. 3 12 00 

:Se!f- Wringing 6 25 

MOWERS— LAWN 

14 in. 16 in. 

Woodyatt $7 75 $8 26 

Empress 10 00 10 64 

Daisy 6 16 

Star 7 00 7 50 

NAILS 

Wire, f.o.b. Fort William. $6.60 
base ; Winnipeg, $6 base. Cut f.o.b. 

Winnipeg. $6.65. 

NETTING— POULTRY 

Net Prices Per Roll 

1 in. mesh x 24 in $6 95 

30 in 7 20 

36 in 8 60 

2 in. mesh x 24 in 2 99 

30 in 3 40 

36 in 4 06 

48 in 6 26 

60 in 6 66 

72 in 7 80 

NETTING. Poultry, 16%. 

Banner Netting, 24 in.. $4.16 ; 36 
in., $5.30; 48 in., $6.26; 60 in., 
$7.40; 72 in.. $8.40. 

NUTS 

Square, small lots, blank, 4%c 
tapped, 4%c advance on list ; Hexa- 
gon, small lots, blank, 4%c ; Tap- 
ped, 5c advance on list ; case lots 
all styles, Ic less than above. 

OILS 

"Buffolite," 24c; Ideal Thresher, 
47c : "B" Castor machine oil, 38c ; 
Buffalo engine gasoline, 37%c; Buf- 
falo "A" gas engine oil, 50c ; Royal 
gasoline, 37c ; Family safety coal 
oil, 24%c; "Engoline" engine coil 
oil, 20%c; Summer black oil, 22V2C: 
Kelso engine oil, 47c ; Electro oil, 
45c ; Royalite oil, 20c ; Standard 
gas engine oil, 48c ; Prairie Har- 
vester oil, 49%c. 

PAINTS 

Stephens' Out White, $3.95 ; 
•Stephens' House, $3.85 : Stephens' 
Floor, $3.30 : Silkstone, $3.15 ; Ste- 
phens' Barn Paint, $1.70. 

DRY COLORS 

Yellow ochre, in bbl. lots, Sc ; 
less than barrel lots, 4c ; golden 
ochre, barrels, 4c less ; than barrels, 
5c ; Venetian red, barrels, $2.60 ; 
less than barrels, $3.60 ; American 
Vermillion, 20c ; English Vermillion, 
$3 per lb. ; Canadian metallic ox- 
ides, barrel lots, 3%c ; English 
purple oxide, in casks, 3%c ; less 
quantities, 4c per lb. Red lead 
kegs, $19 ; less quantities, 20c. 

PICK. Clay, 6-7, $12.25 per doz. 

POLISH— 

O-Cedar — Dos. 

4 oz $2 09 

12 oz 4 90 

1 quart 10 00 

% gal 16 09 

1 gal 24 00 

Liquid Veneer — 

4 01 8 90 

12 oz 4 00 

1 quart 8 40 

% gal 14 49 

(Continned on second p««e>) 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



77 




Satisfaction, 
Again — 
— and again 



In winning a new customer to Stephens' 
the dealer knows that future business is 
doubly sure because experience tells him 
that repeated satisfaction in any line al- 
ways means repeat orders. 

Stephens' paints are easily applied, cover 
much surface, and are remarkable in 
their wearing qualities. 

That is why they so exactly meet the re- 
quirements of the Westerner. 

So Mr. Western Dealer, try to make new 
converts to Stephens by steadily pushing 
this line. It will mean repeated satisfac- 
tion to your customer — and increased 
sales and profits to you. 

Write for our proposition. 



MANUFACTURED BY 

G. F. STEPHENS & CO., Ltd. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

WINNIPEG, CAN. 

Branch at Calgary, Alt a. 




HlBEfMNl 




^IJTSIDE WHITE 




78 



II A R D W ARE AND METAL 



July 6, 19] S 



Winnipeg Hardware Onotations-condnued 



Galv. 


$ 8 


42 


8 


BO 


9 


63 


12 


38 


18 


27 


24 


75 


29 


57 


39 


78 


63 


59 


83 


16 











PIPE, WROUGHT IRON 

Per 100 Ft. Black 

14 inch $ 6 08 

% inch 6 16 

% inch 7 83 

% inch 9 95 

1 inch 14 67 

1% inch 19 88 

1% inch 23 76 

2 inch 32 04 

2% inch 51 30 

3 inch 67 05 

3% inch 84 92 

4 inch 100 62 

4% inch 116 10 

6 inch 1»5 00 

J inch 174 60 



PLASTER. Paris, per bbl., $4.50. 

PLATES, CANADA 

18x21 per box, half polish, $10.26 ; 
full polished, $11.75; 18x24, half 
polished, $10.28; full polished. 
$11.7B; 20x28, half polished, $10.85; 
full polished, $11.75. 

PLOW SHARES, 21c per lb. 

POINTS 

Landslide plow, 1^8x14 in.. $3 55 
per dozen. 

PUTTY 

100-lb. irons 55 70 

25-lb. irons, per cwt 6 30 

1%-lb. tins 12 

RIVETS AND BURRS 

Iron riv«ts, 10% ; copper. No. 7, 
tec lb. ; No. 8. 66c ; No. 9. 69c : Ko. 
10, 71c; No. 12. 76e. 

Five-lb. assorted boxes. No. 8, 
74c; No. 10, 78c lb. 

Copper Burrs, No. 7. 65c: No. 8, 
66c; No. 9. 69c; No. 10. 71e ; No. 
12. 76e. 

ROPE 

Sisal. 28%c base ; pure Manila, 
39%c base; British Manila. 33%c 
base: lath yarn, 28%c base; African 
hemp, 33%c base; cotton rope, Vi 
and over. 65c lb. 

Tarred Marline panks. per lb., 
fiOe. 

SANDPAPER— 

Star— Quire Ream 

00, 0. % $0 38 $ 7 20 

1 89 7 50 

li^ 43 8 10 

2 46 8 70 

aVz 49 9 80 

3 57 10 80 

B. & A.— 

00, 0, % 45 8 50 

1 47 9 00 

1% 50 9 60 

J 55 10 50 

j^4 60 11 00 

a • 67 12 75 



SASH BALANCES (Caldwell). 
Net list. 

SAWS, BUCK 

Happy Medium. $10.00 ; Watch 
Spring:. $10.40 ; Lance Tooth or 
Lightning Blades, $10.90. 

SCREWS 

Bright iron round head, 60% ; flat 
head. 65% ; round head, brass. 25% ; 
flat head, brass. 30% ; coach. 20%. 

SCYTHES— Doi. 

Bramble $13 25 

Bush 13 25 

Excelsior 14 50 

Cast 12 50 

SNATHS— 

No. 2 loop 11 50 

Bush 13 00 

SWEEPERS, CARPET— 

See list in regular "Current Mar- 
ket Quotations" Column, f.o.b. fac- 
tory, Niagara Falls, Ont. 

SWEEPERS, VACUUM— Doz. 

Grand Rapids. Nic $87 00 

Household, Jap 75 00 

Superba, Nic 102 00 

F.o.b. Jobbers' Warehouses, Win- 
nipeg. 

STEEL SHEETS, BLACK 

10 gauge $9 45 

12 gauge 9 45 

14 gauge .' 9 4.") 

16 gauge 9 45 

18-20 gauge 9 30 

22-21 gauge 9 SO 

26 gauge 9 33 

28 gau'ire 9 4.'3 

SHOVELS AND SPADES 

Shovels— Fox and Olds. D.H.. Sqr. 
Pt.. $13.50 per doz. ; D.H. Rd. Pt.. 
$13.50 per doz. ; L.H. Sqr Pt., 
$13.50; L.H. Rd. Pt, $13.50; Bull- 
dog and Jones, D.H., Rd. Pt.,$15.50 ; 
D.H. Sqr. Pt., $15.50; L.H., Rd. 
Pt., $15.50; L.H.. Sqr. Pt.. $15.50; 
L.H.. Rd. Pt., $15.50; Black Cat 
and Orescent Scoops — No 4. $17.00 
doz.: No. 6, $17.50: No. 8, $18.00; 
No. 10, $18.60 ; Moose & Jones 
Scoops, No. 4, $18.25: No. 6, $18.75; 
No. 8, $19.25; No. 10, $19.75. 

SOLDER. Per pound. 66 to 67. 
SPIKES 

Pressed, hi in.. $8.30 ; S-16, $7.95 ; 
%. $7.75: %. $7.65. 

STAPLES 

Bright wire, per cwt.. $5.85 at 
Fort William. $6.25 Winnipeg ; gal- 
vanized staples. $6.65 Fort William, 
$7.05, Winnipeg. 

STEEL 

Sleighshoe, $5.80 base per cwt. ; 
plow, common. $6.50 ; crucible plov/. 
$7.60 : angle. $5.35 ; harrow. $5.60 
base ; cast, octagon tool steel, 20c 
base : square tool. 20c base ; spring, 
$7.50 ; machine. $8.00 base ; tire. 
$5.60. Mid, 3-16. V4. 5-16, $8.00 
base ; other sizes $5.75 base. Band 
Steel. $5.75 base. 



STEEL HOOPS 

^ in., $9.75 ; % in.. <9.M ; % in.. 
$8.75; % in., $8.60; 1 in., $8.50; 
1% in., $8.50; 1% in., $8. 

STEEL SQUARES 

5% on list. 

TACKS. Carpet. 65% lUt. 
TIES. Cow. 6%. 

TIN AND TERNE PLATE 

20 X 28 I.C $32 00 

20 X 28 I.X 35 00 

20 x 33 I.C 37 85 

20 X 33 I.X 40 00 

Terne plates 'i* l»u 

TRAPS, GAME— Doz. 

Victor H.& N. Jump 

No. $1 95 

No. 1 2 30 $3 60 $3 10 

No. IVa 3 45 5 40 4 55 

No. 2 4 80 7 50 6 70 

No. 3 6 40 10 00 

TUBS— Wood Fibre 

No. $21 35 $23 80 

No. 1 18 80 20 45 

No. 2 16 40 16 95 

No. 3 14 00 14 45 

TURPENTINE 

See weekly report. 

TWINE (WRAPPING) Lb. 

Cotton, 4-ply 72 

Cotton, 3-ply 68 

Dozen 

VARNISHES 

Stephens Luminette, sal $2 20 

Stephens Exalite. sral 3 00 

WARES. ETC. 

Scotch Grey. 49. 121/4% discount. 

Colonial. Imperial. Pearl, 20. 
7%% discount. 

Premier, Canada, Diamond, 2V4% 
discount. 

Whiteware. 40, 10% discount. 
Japanned Ware. list, plus 30%. 

Japanned Ware, white, list, plus 
40%. 

Japanned Sprinklers, list, plus 
30%. 

Stamped Ware, plain, 40. 10% 
discount. 

Stamped Ware, ret'd. 40% dis- 
count. 

Pieced Tinware, ordinary, list, 
plus 40%. 

Pieced Tinware, copper bottoms. 
list, plus 60%. 

Sheet Iron Ware, list, plus 20%. 

Light Galv'd Pails and Tubs, list, 
plus 27%%. 

Heavy Galv'd Pails and Tubs. 
17%% discount. 

Jap. Coal Hods. list, plus 35%. 

Galv'd Coal Hods. list, plus 60%. 



WASHERS 

Iron, small lota, 159( ea Ibt -f 
76e: full boxes, iron, l»% on Iki* 

-I- 75c. 

WHITE LEAD 

Decorators' pure, ton lots, $17.15 ; 
less than ton lots. $17.50. 

WIRE. BARB 

Lyman, 4-point, $4.98 f.o.b. Fort 
William, $5.25 Winnipeg;; Glldden 
Cattle, 2-pt.. $4.80 Fort William, 
$6.10 Winnipeg: Baker 2-pt.. $4.76 
Ft. William, $6.05 Winnipeg: plain 
twist, cwt.. Ft. William, $4.96 ; Win- 
nipeg. $5.25 spool ; plain salvanized. 
Ft. William. No. 9, $6.65; No. 12. 
$6.85 ; Winnipeg. No. 9. $6.05 ; N& 
12. $6.26 ; coil spring. Ft. William. 
No. 9. $6.70: No. 12, $6.95; Wlnni 
peg. No. 9. $6.10; No. 12, $6.36. 

Patented screen in 100-ft. rolls. 
$3.50 per hundred sq. ft. ; in 50-ft. 
rolls, $3.60 per 100 sq. ft. 

WIRE, PLAIN 

Bale ties, 14 Kance, aluKle loop. 
$7.66 Winnipeg ; 17.26 Ft. WiliUm 

Brass snare wire, per }h., tOe. 

WIRE ANNEALED 

No. 9, $6.75; 10, $6.80; 12, $6.95; 
14, $7.15; 15. $7.25; 16, $7.40 per 
100 lbs. 

WRENCHES (NUT)— 

Agricultural — Doz. 

6 in $ 6 50 

8 in 7 80 

10 in 9 10 

12 in 11 70 

15 in 15 60 

Perfect Handle — 

6 in 13 50 

8 in 16 20 

10 in 18 90 

12 in 24 30 

15 in 32 40 

18 in 43 20 

WRENCHES (PIPE)— 

Stillson- Each 

6 in $1 60 

S in 1 18 

10 in 1 2B 

14 in 1 7B 

18 in 2 60 

24 in 8 60 

36 in 6 7B 

Trimo — 

10 in $1 46 

14 in 2 60 

18 in 2 90 

24 in 4 16 

Dozen 

Always Ready— Black N.P. 

No. 1 $4 20 $4 50 

No. 2 5 75 6 00 

WRINGERS 

Royal Canadian, $61.90 per doz. ; 
Eze. $66.10 per dox. ; Bicycle. $62 
per doz. ; Ajax, $126.00 doz. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



79 




We ■ Carry a Full Line 

of 

RIE NIE PRODUCTS 



as manufactured by the Durkee Atwood Co. 




Lining Top Dye 
Painting Outfits 
Air-Drying Enamel 
Aluminium Enamel 
Tyre Re-Nu 
Cylinder Enamel 



Tire Talc 

Rust and Scale Remover 
Radiator Cement 
Radiator Compound 
Carbon Remover 
Vulcanizing Cement 
Auto Patches 

Each Product a Leader in its Class 



Rubber Filler 
Patching Cement 
Valve Grinding 

Compound 
Graphite 
Leather Dressing 



GREAT WEST ELECTRIC CO., LIMITED 

WINNIPEG 

Distributors for Laco Tungsten and Nitre Lamps 



Gregg Mfg. Co., Limited' 



WINNIPEG 




Gregg Plow Eveners 
Pull Big Business 

Gregg Plow Eveners, like Gregg Wagon Sets, Neck- 
yokes and Hitches, are built for service. They are 
guaranteed against defective materials and M^orkman- 
ship. 

Send for copy of cata- 
logue describing our 
full line. 

Any jobber in the 
Canadian West can 
supply you with Gregg 
Goods. 



80 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



THE BUYERS' GUIDE 

// what you want is not here, write us, and we will tell you where to get it. Let us suggest that you 
consult also the advertisers' index facing the inside back cover, after having secured advertisers' names 
from this directory. The information you may desire may be found in the advertising pages. This de- 
partment is maintained for the benefit and convenience of our readers. The insertion of advertisers' 
headings is gladly undertaken, but does not become part of any advertising contract. 



Abrasives 

The Cartjonmdum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 

Canadian B. K. Morton Co., Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Aluminum 

Biitieh Aluminum Co., Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

A. 0. Leelie & Co., Montreal. 

Louis MdLain Co,, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Aluminum Ware 

Thofi. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Ltd., Montreal. 

Louis MdLain Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. Man. 

Merchants Hard\Tare Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 

War* Mfg. Co., Oakrille, Ont 
Ammunition 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

OaTerhill, Leannont & Co., Montreal. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Remington Arms-Dnlon Metallic Cartridge Co., 
■Windsor. 
Auto Accessories 

Adamson Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont- 

Boston Varnish Co., Everett Station, Boston, Mass. 

Canadian Cart>on Co., Toronto, 

Canada Cycle 4 Motor Co., Litd,, Westoa, Ont. 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Canadian National Ca*on Co., Toronto. 

Canadian Falrt>anb3JMoree Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Cannon Oiler Co., Keithsburg, III. 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Cummings Bros., Flint, Mich. 

Oushman iMcrtor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg. Man. 

Duulop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Agricultural Supplies 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Bleotric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Geo. W. Griffiths & Son., Stratford, Ont 

Hyslop Bros. , Toronto. 

C. Kloepper, Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Leeks & Potts, Hamilton, Ont. 

Line, Hansen & Eimball Co., Moose Jaw, Sask. 

Metal Specialties Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

Frank Mossberg Co., AtUeboro, Mass. 

MoKinnon Ohain Co., St. Cattiarinea. 

New Era Spring Specialty Co., Grand Rapids, 
Mi<^. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Will B. Lane, ChlCMo, 111. 

Beeder Weeks IMfg. Oo., Hamilton, Ont. 

Reck Island Mfg. Co., Chicago. 111. 

C. A. ShaJer Co., Waupun, Wis. 

TRiermoid RuWber Ca, Trenton, N.J. 

Samuel Trees & Co., Toronto. 

Trimont Mfe. Co., Roxbury, Mass. 

WQkinson & Eompass, Hamilton. 

Ktniinger. Bruce & Co., Niagara Falls. OnL 

TJneeda Ford Demoimtable Wheel Co., Toronto. 

Vemald Mf(r Co.. North Eaot. Pa 

William."; & Co., J. H., BrookbTi. N.T. 
Automobiles 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Axes 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co.. Ltd.. Ottawa. 

Canada Foundries & Forglngs, Brockrille. 

Can. Warren Axe and Tool Co., St. CatharinM. 

CaveAlU, Learmont & Co., Mcmtreal. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Babbitt Metal 

Thos. Birkett 4; Son Co., Ltd.. Ottawa. 

8 an. B. K. Morton Co., Montreal, 
anada Metal Co., Toronto, 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Hoyt Metal Ce., Toronto. 

Owl Metal Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., HamllLon. 
Barrel Liners 

J. N. Warminton & Co., Montreal, Que. 
Basins, China and Enamelled Iron 

Etoplre Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Batteries, Dry 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Great Weirt Electric Co.. Ltd., Winnipeg. Man. 

Canadian General Electric Co.. Toronto. 

Dominion Battery Co.. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 

Northern Electric Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 
Baths, Enamelled and Copper 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Bmiplre Mff. Ce., tondon, Ont 
Bath Room Fixtures 

Rmplre Mfg. Co., lyondon, Ont, 

Khiztafer, Bruoe A Co., lytd., Niagara Falls, 
Ont 

Newell Mff. Oo., Presoott, Ont. 



Bends, Brass, Iron and Lead 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, OnL 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Bibbs, Basin and Bath Cocks, Compression 

Empire Mf(t Co., London, Ont. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. To., Toronto. 

United Brassfounders, Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 
Bibbs, Basin and Bath Cocks, Fuller 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. To.. Toronto. 

United Brassfoimders, Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 
Brass Goods 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont 
Brass Castings and Goods 

Booth-Coulter Co., Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Jas. Cartland & Son, Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

Jas. Morrison Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co.. Toronto, Ont 

United Brass Founders. Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 

Williams Bros. & Piggott, Ltd., Birmingham, 
Eng. 
Brass. Sheets and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Co., Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Empire Mifg. Co., London, Ont. 

A. C. Leslie & Co., Montreal. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton. 
Bevels 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

h. 8. flitarrett Co.. Athol. Mass. 
Belting, Transmission, Elevator and Coneyor 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Belting . Rubber 

Can. Consolidated Rubber Co,, Montreal. Que. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Gutta Percha & Rubber. I/td.. Tonmto. 
Belting, Cotton 

Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Blacksmiths' Supplies 

D. Ackland & Son, Winnipeg. 
Blankets. Saddle 

Burlington Wind-sor Blanket Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gait Robe Co., Gait, Ont 
Bolts and Nuts 

Raines & Peckover, Toronto. 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Caverhill. Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

C. Kloeipper, Limited. Toronto, Ont 

Lewis Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

London Bolt & Hinge Works. London. Ont 

The Stanley Works. New Britain. Conn. 

Steel Co. of Canada. X^td., Hamilton. 

The Toronto Ixick Mfg. Co., Toronto. Ont 

Northern Bolt ^ Screw Co.. Owen Sound. 

Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton. 
Boiler Tubes 

Paines ^ Peckover. Toronto. 
Boilers, Heatiner and Range 

Empire Mfg. Co., London. Ont 
Bolts. Eye 

William.? & Co., J. H., Prnoklj-n. N.T. 
Bolts, Panic 

Wm. Newman & Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 
Boxes. Wood 

Canadian Wood Products Co., Toronto. Can. 
Boot Calks and Tools 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Boring Bars 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Ltd., Dnndas. 
Box Opening Tools 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Bale Ties 

Beauehamp. J. E., Montreal. 

Laidlaw Bale Tie Co., Hamilton. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd.. Hamilton. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Bale Tie Buckles 

J. N. Warminton & Co., Montreal, Que. 
Barbed Wire 

Banwell, Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ltd., Hamilton. 
Baskets 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Bam Door Hanirers 
AUith iMfff. Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton. Ont 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton. 

National Mfe. Co.. Strrline. 111. 

Stanley Works. New Britain. Conn. 

Taylor JFort)e« Co., Quelph, Ont 

The Toronto Lock ^Ifg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Barrel Stands 

Wakyte Mfg. Co., Winnipeg. 
Balers, Steel 

Climax Baler Co., Hamilton. 

Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 



Bit, Braces 

Caverhill, Learmon; & Co., Montreal. 

Russell, Jennings Mfg. Co., Chester, Conn. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Brackets, Shelf 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

The Stanley Works. New Britain. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Box Strapping 

J. E. Beauehamp & Co., Montreal. 

The Stanley Works. New Britain, Conn. 

J. N. Warminton & Co., Montreal, Que. 
Blasting Supplies 

Dnpont Powder Co., Wilmington, Del. 
Building Papers 

McArthur & Co., Alex., Montreal, Que. 
Butter Molds 

Wm. Cane & Sons Co., Ltd., Newmarket, Ont 

Walter Woods & Co.. Hamilton, Can. 
Butter Workers 

Beatty Bros., Ltd., Fergus, Ont 
Butts and Hinges 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Broekvllle, Ont. 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, lU. 

National Mfg. Co., Steriing, 111. 

The Stanley Works. New Britain, Conn. 

The Toronto Ixjck Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Burrs 

The Stanley Works, New "Britain, Conn. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 

Parmenter & Bullock, Gananoque. 
Bread and Cake Makers 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Conn. 
Breast Drills 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Oooa. 

Goodem>ratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Brushes and Brooms 

Boeckh Bros. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Meakins & Sons, Ltd., Hamilton. 

Megantlc Broom Co., Lake Megantlc, Que. 

T. S. Simms & Co., Ltd., 8t John. 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Bits, Auger 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Ruseell. Jennings 'Mfe. Co., Cjbestor, Qmn. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphni, FIL 

Wilkinson & Eompass, Hamilton. 

Scythes, Ltd., Toronto. 
Bits, Forstner 

Progressive Mfg. Co., TorringtoB, Conn. 
Bicycles 

A. E. Bregent & Co., Monitreal, Que. 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co., Toronto. 

Hyslop Bros., Ltd., Toronto. 

Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works, Ltd., Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co., Dtd,, WestOD, Ont. 
Buckles, Bale Tie 
J. E. Beauehamp & Co., Montreal, Que. 
Builders' Hardware 

.Mlith Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Hamilton, Ont. 

T. Brais & Co., Clevdand, Ohio. 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton. 

Ja.s. Cartland & Son, Ltd., Birmingham, An. 

National Hardware Co., OrUIia. Ont. 

National Mfg. Co., Steriing. 111. 

The Stanley Works, New firitaln. Cunt. 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd.. Stratford, Ont 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Bumpers, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Cabinet Hardware 

Stratford Brass Co., "Ltd., Stratford, Ont 
Calipers and Dividers 

Caverhill. Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

L. S. Starrett Co,, Athol, Mass. 
Caliper Gauges 

Williams & Co., J. H.. Brooklyn, N.T. 
Cans 

A. R. Whittall Can Co., Montreal, Que. 
Cans. Gasoline, Oil 

Cannon Oiler Co., Keith*urg, HI. 
Canoes 

Canadian Canoe Co., Peterboro, Ont. 
Carriage Hardware 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont. 
Cartridges 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Ltd.. MentrMl. 

Remington Arms-Onion Metallic OartrMge Cs.. 
Windsor. 



July 6, 1918 




HARDWARE AND METAL 

Familiarize yourself 
with our catalogue 

There is a much larger market for brushes in your community 
than you realize. 

We make hundreds of different kinds of brushes for hundreds of 
different kinds of uses. Almost every line of trade requires one 
or more 'of the different styles we make. 

Why not familiarize yourself with the Meakins' catalogue and 
catch the bulk of brush sales you are now missing. 

We do not suggest that you carry stocks or even a sample of every 
variety of brush, but we do suggest that you have our catalogue 
and familiarize yourself with our various brushes in order to be 
able to suggest the right brush to the right person for the right 
need. 

Sell from our Catalogue. Just a last word: Meakins' 
Brushes are good brushes — and our catalogue will tell 
you why. Our catalogue is valuable. Have you a copy? 

MEAKINS & SONS 

LIMITED 

Hamilton, Ontario 

Warehouses : Winnipeg, London, Toronto, Montreal 



81 




LEAKY 



im^i 



^ fTEEDS 

'PATENT 

ROOF CEMENT 




The Quickest Repair for 
Slate, Metal, Shingle and 
Composition Roofs 

Reed's patent Roof Cement is the most 
useful substance a roofer or plumber 
can have. 

It quickly mends all manner of leaks in 
slate, metal, gravel and prepared roofs 
— is effective for painting around chim- 
neys, skylights, and dormer windows, 
and for repairing coping stones, gut- 
ters and wood and stone work. 
It has never failed to stick where laid in 
any kind of weather. 

A trial order of the smaller tins will soon 
demonstrate its stability and value in 
stimulating sales. Try it. 

This is a season when roof repairs 
can be most conveniently made. 

Geo. W. REED & Co., Ltd. 

Manufacturers 

MONTREAL 



82 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



July 6, 1918 



Cash Carriers 

Gipe-Hazard Store Serrice 0»., 
Casters 

Faultless Caster Co., ETaasrlUe, Ind. 

Canada Foundriea A Forcings, Ltd., BfMkriU* 
Ont. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg, Co., Toronto, Ont 
Carpet Sweepers 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Co., Niagara FalJs, Ont. 

Thos. Birltett & Son Co., Ltd., Otiawa. 

Carerhlll, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Chains, Coil, Boom, Hammock, Tether, Do«, 
Halter, Cow, Breast, Trace, Tire 

M^Kinnon Chain Co., St. Catharines, Oirt. 

Reeder-Weekes Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 

Cable Carriers 

Gipe-Hazard Store Service Co., Toro»t» 

Cement, Rubbe' 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Cement, Roofing , _ 

Geo. W. Beed & Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Chisels, Cape, Cold, etc. 

Brown-Boggs Co., Ltd., Hamilton. 

CaTerhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Qoodell-Pratt Co., Qreenifleld, Mass. 

Buck Bros., Milburj, Mass. 

SUnley Rule & LeTel Co., New Britain, Oran. 

National Machinery & Supply Co., HamUfOn. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Checking Floor Hinges 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, IH. 

Toronto Lock Mf». Co., Toronto. 
Chemical Closets 

Wakyte Mfg. Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Chemical Specialties 

Vol-Peek Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Chucks, Tap 

Wells Bros, of Canada. Gait 
Chums, Hand and Power 

Beatty Bros., Ltd., Fergus. 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Dowswell, Lees Co., Hamilton. 

Faultless Caster Co., ETansrille, Ind. 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New BriUin, Conn. 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary. 

Alta. ^ 

Reliable Cbum Co., Toronto, Can. 
Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 

Clocks 

Western CTock Co., 'La Salle, 111. 
Clothes Racks 
Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 

0»n. Foundries & Forglnas. Ltd., Br»olrrtlle, Oat 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 

Clippers „ „ 

Amertoan Shearer Mifg. Co., Nashan, N.H. 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago, 111. 

Closet Seats . ,.„ ,. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockyille, Ont 

Clothes Dryers 
Dowswell, Lees Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ca», 

Canadian Woodenware Co., St. Themsa, Ont. 
Coffee Percolators and Um» 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Wianlpet Man. 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New BriUin, Conn. 
Corrugated Fasteners 

J. E. Beaucharop, Montreal. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Collar Pads 

American Pad & Textile Co., Chatham. 
Cotton Gloves 

American Pad & Textile Co., Chatham. 
Coal Chutes 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co., Winnipeg. 
Coal 3o(^ 

Thos. Daridson alfg. Co., Jtd., Montreal, Que. 
Cobblers' Sets , . ^ ^ 

Can. Foundries * Forgings, Ltd., Brockrille, Ont. 
Cookers, Steam 

Louis McLaln Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Cookers, Flreless 

Royal Flreless Cooker Co., Ottawa, Ont 
Concrete, Reinforcing Steel 

Baines & Peokorer. Toronto. 
Conductor Pipe, Hooks, etc. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Winnipeg Ceiling &. Roofing Co., Winnipeg. 

Wheeler & Bain, Toronto. 

Enspire Mfe. Co., London, Ont 
Connecting- Rods 

Williani.s & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Coping Saws 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co.. Ltd.. Ottawa. 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn- 
Cordage 

Branrtford Cordage Co.. Brantford. Ont. 

Consnmers Cordage Co., Montreal. 

Plvmouth Cordage Co., Toronto. 
Cooking Ware 

Comin* OlaM Works, Coming, N.Y. 
Crank Shafts 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Crowbars 

W. J. CoKhlin & Co.. Moi.*real. 
CnlttTators 

J. ■. GHlsoB Mff. Co., Port Washington, IB. 

O. B. Nerereas ft Sou, Bnshaell, HI. 



Cntlery 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, Coim. 

Gee. Butler & Co., Ltd,, ShelTleld, Eng. 
Thos. birkett & Son (Jo., Ltd., Ottawa. 

QsTerhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 

Ooodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

James Hutton ft Co., Montreal. 

Canadian Wm. A. Rogers, Ltd., Toronto. 

Jonathan Crookea ft Son, Ltd., Shefrield, Bng. 

Lewis Bros. Ltd., MontreaL 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Conn. 

Wm. R««ren Mfg. Co., Niagara Falls, Ont 

J. Wise ft Sens, 
Cutters 

Butterfield & Co., Inc., Rock Island, Que. 

Trimont Mfg. Co., Roxbury (Boston, Mass.). 
Cuspidors 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Dairy Pails 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Dampers, Stove Pipe 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockville. 
Dampers, Fire Place 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Desks, School 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, lytd., Brockville, Ont. 
Dies, Stocks, Etc. 

Butterfield ft Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Ltd., Dundas, Ont 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait 
Dish Washers 

Home Helps Sales Co., Montreal. 
Display Racks and Stands 

Cameron & Cameron, Toronto. 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. . 
Doors, Metal 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Doors, Screen 

Kasement Skrene Dore Co., Toronto. 
Door Bolts 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton, Can. 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Door Checks 

Canadian Yale & Towne, St Catharines. 

G. W. MaJlory Co., Blenheim, Ont 

Wm. Newman & Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Door Hangers 

Allith .Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Taylor-Foities Co., Guelph, Ont 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Door Springs 

Jas. Cartland ft Son, Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

G. W. Mallory, Blenheim, Ont 

Wm. Newman & Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Door Pulls 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont 
Draining Tools 

Canadian Shovel & Tool Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Drills, Breast 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Drill Chucks 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Drills, Blacksmiths' 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockville. 
DrilU 

Canadian Fairbanks-IMorse Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Butterfield & Co., Inc., Rock Island, Que. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton, Ont. 
Drop Forgings 

William.? & Co., J. H., BrooldiTi, N.Y. 
Dry Colors 

Brandram-Henderson, Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

R. C. Jamieson & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Ottawa Paint Works. Ottawa. 

A. Ram.<;ay & Son Co., Montreal. 

G. F. Stephens ft Co.. Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Martin-Senour Co.. Ltd., Montreal. 

MoArthur Irwin. Montreal. 
Dusters 

Channell Chemical Co., Toronto. 
Dynamite 

Du Pont American Industries, Wilmington, Del. 
Dry Cells 

Canada Dry Cells. Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Canadian H. W. JohnsJManville Co., Toronto. 

Canadian General Electric Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 

Dominion Battery Co., Toronto. 

Great W»st Electric Co., Ltd., Winnineg, JIan. 

Spielmann .Agencies, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Eavetrough 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 

Pedlar Peonle. Limited. Oshawa. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Toronto Tx>ck Mfp. Co., Toronto. 

Winnipeg Celling ft Roofing Co., Winnipeg. 
Egg Beaters 

Louis MoLain Co., Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man. 

Collelte Mfg. Co., Colllngwood. 
Eg(t Cases 

Miller Bros. Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Walter Woods ft Co., Hamilton. 



Egg Case Fillers 

-Uiller Bros. Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Wali;er Woods & Co., Hamilton, Can. 
l!;jectors and Syphons 

Jas. Morrison Braas Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Elbows 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd,, Montreal. 

Pedlar i'eople, Ltd., Oshawa, Ont. 

Wheeler & Bain, Toronto. 

Winnipeg Ceiling ft Hooting Co., Wbmipef. 
Electric Bells 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Electric Fans 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

JJorthem Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

A. C. Gilbert Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Electric Fixtures 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Eleotric Co.. Ltd., Wlimipeg, Mas. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton. 
Electric Grates 

Great West Eleotric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Toronto Lock Mfg, Co., Toronto. 
Electric Materials 

A. G. .Martin, Ottawa, Ont 
Electric Plates 

Louis MdLain Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Electric Specialties 

Benjamin EleCtrio Co., Toronto. 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toroats. 

Canadian National CartxHi Co., Toronto. 

Dominion Battery Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Factory Products Co., Toronto. 

A. C. Gilbert Co., New Haven, Conn. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Interstate Electric Novelty Co., Torcnto. 

Landers, Frary ft Clark, New Britain, Cona. 

National Eleotric Heating Co., Teroato. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Spielmann Agencies. Ltd.. Montreal, Que. 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont. 
Electrical Toys 

A. C. GUbert Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Electro-plating 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Enamels 

Boston Varnish Co., Everett Station, Boston, Mass. 
Enamelled Ware 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Sheet Jletal Products Co. of Canada, Toronto. 

E. T. Wright Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Engines 

Cushman Motor Works. Ltd., Winnipeg. Maa. 
Emery Glass and Papers 

John Oakey ft Sons, London, Eng. 
Eveners 

Gregg Mfg. Co., (Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

D. Auckland & Son, Ijtd. , Winnipeg, Man. 
Expansion Tanks 

Pease Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Explosives 

Du Pont Powder Co., Wilmington, Del. 
Escutcheon Pins 

Parmenter ft Bulloch Co,, Ltd., Garenoque, Ont 
Extinguishers, Fire 

Booth-Coulter Co., Toronto. 

Great West Eleotric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man 

Northern Eleotric Co., Montreal. 

Fanlight Openers 

Jas. Cartland ft Son, Ltd., Birmingham, Bng. 
Fanning Mills 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Wiimlpeg, Man. 
Fasteners, Storm, Sash and Screen 

National Mfg. Co., Steriing. lU. 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Farm Lighting Outfits 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal. 
Faucets. Petroleum 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Oat 
Feed Boxes 

Canada Foundries ft Forgings, Brockville. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Feed Cookers 

Wheeler ft Bain, Toronto. 
James Bros. Co., Perth. 

Felts (Tarred and Carpet) 

Mc.irthur & Co., Alex., Monlreal, Que. 
Fencinc and Gates 
Banwell-Hoxie Wire Fence Co.. Hamilton. 
McGregor-Banwell Fence Co., Ltd., WalkerviHe 
Standard Tube ft Pence Co., Woodstock. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamiltoa. 

Ferrules, Brass, Iron and Lead 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Fibre Ware 

E. B. Eddy Co., Hull, Que. 

Files 

E. C. Atkins Co., Hamilton, Can. 
G. ft H. Bamett Co., Philadelphia. 
Can. B. K. Morton Co., Montreal, Toronto. 
Delta File Works, Philadelphia, 
Henry Dlsston ft Sons, Ltd.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nicholson File Co.. Port Hoiw, Ont 
Plewes. Ltd.. Winnipeg. 

Port Hope File Mfg. Co., Port Hope, Ont 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Montreal. 
Wilkinson ft Eompasi, Hamilton. 
Fillers 
Boston Varnish Co.. Everett Station. Boston, Mass. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Substantial Reasons 
Why Diamond Tires 
Mean Sales to YOU 

DIAMOND TIRES have acquired a reputation for 
cutting tire upkeep that spells sales to every dealer. 
The purchase price of tires means nothing if the 
tires do not wear well; if they do not cost less to 
run. 

In buying DIAMOND TIRES your customer begins 
to cut "tire upkeep" from the first minute — and keeps 
on cutting "tire upkeep" the more he runs them. 

Help him cut tire upkeep costs four ways 
at once — by putting on four DIAMONDS. 

North American Hardware Supply, Limited 



Wholesale 
Hardware 

"Diamond" 
Tires 

Accessories 

222 Notre 
Dame St. 

West 
Montreal 



Dress up your ca^ 
wilh 




^Diamond 

SQUEEGEE TY^y^^ 
TREAD I ire* 



PLEWtS LliyilTEl 



The Famous Sawyer 
Endless Thresher Belt! 



/r-iz 



t/S 



Every thresher- 
man knows the 
value and 
quality in a 
Sawyer 
Belt. He 
knows 
they'll stand 
up under 
hard usage, 
remain pli- 
a b 1 e and 
elastic in all 
nv e a t h ers, 
are uniform 
i n weight, 
s t r e n gth 

/and surface, 
and unaf- 
fected b y 
/ heat and 

cold. 

/There is no gamble 
, for the merchant in 
Sawyer Belts. They 
always sell. 



W I N N I P EG 




DOUGALL "KONKRETO" 

*'the varnish that lasts longest" 

A composition (two which 
become one) for the sani- 
tary treatment of concrete 
floors, walls and ceilings. 

It gives them a smooth and 
moisture-proof surface. 
Prevents their WEARING 
DUSTY and GETTING 
MOULDY. 

Makes them as easy to 
clean and keep clean a s 
tiling. 

Makes cement look and 
feel like hard rubber. 

Makes concrete floors look 
at their best. 

Write for our booklet, 
"KONKRETO," to-day. 

Shall we also mail you our 
proposition? 

The Dougall Varnish Co. 

Limited 
"the varnish that lasts longest" 

Montreal, ...sjsss^^ Canada 




84 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



July 6, 1918 



Fire Arras 

Colta Fatent Fire Amu Mfg. Co., B*TU>>.a 
Conn. 

Johnson Uer Anns & Cycle Works, Fltddwrt 
Mass. 
Fire Door Fittings 

.\nith -Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Uo., UuelpH, Onu 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Fire Extinguishers 

Diinlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Fire Department Supplies 

Booth-Coulter Co., Toronto. 

Canadian Consolidated Uuttber Co., Montreal 

Dunlop Tire & Rutober Co., Toronto, /Cm. 

Uuita Percha & Bubber, Ltd., Toronto. 

J as. Morrison Brass Mi^. Co., Toronto. 

Northern IJlectrie Co., Montreal. 
Furnaces 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd.. BrockTille, Ont. 

Merchants Hardware Specialties, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 
Flashlights, Electric 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Dominion Battery Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. .Man. 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 

Metal Specialties IMfg. Co., Chicago. 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal. 

Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 
Flatware 

Canadian Wm. A. Rogers, Toronto. 

Oneida Community, Ltd., Oneida. N. T. 
Fly Swatters 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toiouto 
Food Choppers 

F. W. Lamplough & Co., Montreal, 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Conn. 

.Merchants Hardware SpeciaMes, Ltd., Calgarj-, 
Alta. 
Force Cups 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Toronto. 

Gutta Percha & Rubt>er, Ltd., Toronto. 
Funnels 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Fixtures, Store 

MMbradt Mfg. Co.. St. Louis, Mo. 
Furnaces 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockrille. 

Enterprise JVIfg. Co., Sackrille, N.B. 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Ltd., Woodstock, Ont. 

Hall Zryd Foundry Co., Ltd., Hespeler, Ont 

Merchants Hardware SpeciaU;ies, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 
Fruit Jars 

Dominion Glass Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Furniture Polish 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

ChanncU Chemical Co., Toronto. 
Fuse Wire 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Floor Stands 

Jenkins Bros.^ Ltd., Montreal. 
Floor Checks, Single or Double 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Flint Cloths 

John Oakey & Sons, London, Eng. 
Galvanized Steel Sheets 

Dominion Sheet Metal Co., Ltd., Hamilton. 

A. C. Leslie & Co, Montreal 

Pedlar People Ltd.. Oshawa, Ont. 
- Wheeler & Bain, Toronto 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co , Winnipeg. 
Garden Cultivators and Weeders 

J. E. Gilson Co., Port Washington, Wis. 

C. S. Norcross & Sons, Bushnell, 111. 

Erie Iron Works, St. Thomas, Ont. 

Eureka Planter Co., Woodstock. 
Garage Hardware 

Allith -Mfs. Co.. Ltd., H.-imilton, Out. 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton, Can. 

National Mfg. Co., Steriinj, 111. 

Richards Wilcox Canadian Co., London, Ont. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Garbage Cans 

Thos. Dayidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

J. Samuels, Toronto. 

Soren Bros.. Toronto. 
Galvanized Ware 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

■Sheet Metal PTOdnc-ls Cn. of ranada. Toronto. 
Galvanizing 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Galvanized Iron Cornices 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 

Pedlar People Ltd., Oshawa. Ont. 
Galvanized Pipe 

Cana.la Metal Co.. Ltd. Toronto. 
Generators 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 

GrMit West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Glass Jars 

Dominion Olaas Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Gas Water Heaters 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Caskets, Rubber 

Dnnlop Tiic & Rubber Goods To.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Gasoline 

Imperial Oil Co., Toronto. 

Prairie City OU Co., Wlnnlpe*. 
Ganges 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Stanley Rule A Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 



Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait. 

Canadian Fairbauks-Murae Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Lrlassware 

L^eks & Potts, Hamilton, Ont 
ilaaa. Window, Plate, Urnamental 

beeks & Potts, Hamilton, Can. 

Toronto Plate Glaaa Importing Co., Toronto. 

G. t\ aiephLOS Co., Winnipeg. 
Glue Pots, Electric 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont. 
ilue. Sheet and Ground 

Canada Glue Co.. Brancford, Ont. 

K, C. Jamieson & Co., Montreal. 

A. Ramsey & Son Co., Montreal. 
^lass Cutters 

Goodell-Pralt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
siiuis Benders 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., Toronto. 
Glaziers' Diamonds 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

A. Ramsay, Son & Co., Montreal, Que. 

Sharrett & Newth, London, Eng. 

A. Shaw & Son, London, Eng. 
Gloves 

Hamilton-Caihartt Co., Toromo. 
Granaries, Portable, Metallic 

I'edlar People Ltd., Oshawa, Ont. 

.Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co., Winnipeg. 
Greases 

Prairie City Oil Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Grinders, Hand and Power 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., (Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Carbonindum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 
Grindstones 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Cleveland Stone Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Grindstone Fixtures 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., BrockvUle, Oni 
Grinding Wheels 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Guns 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co.. Montreal. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Hanington & Richardson Arms Co., Worcester 
Mass. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, Fltehburg. 
Mass. 
Gunsights 

Martile Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, Mich. 
Hack Saws 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

L. 8. SUrrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 

Victor Saw Works, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
Hack Saw Blades 

Diajnond Saw & Stamping Wks., Buffalo, N.T 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

Henry Disston & Sons, Ltd., Toronto. 

Victor Saw Works, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
Hack Saw Frames 

Canadian Fairbanks.'Morse Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn 

Henry Disston & Sons, Ltd., Toronto. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Hack Saw Machines 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Wks., Buffalo, N.T 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

Victor Saw Works, Hamilton. 
Halters 

G. L. Griffith Son. Stratford. Ont. 

Johnson Halter Co., Samia, Ont. 

R. R. Kinread, Winnipeg, Man. 
Hammers 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockville. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Hammocks 

Gait Rdbe Co., Gait, Ont 
Hanil Drills 

Goodell-Pratt Co,, Greenfield, Mass. 
Handles 

J. H. Steel Mfg. Co.. St. Thomas, Ont 
Hand Pulls 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 

Hangers. Door 

.Mlith .Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Hamilton, Out. 

Realty Bros.. Ltd.. Fergus. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton. Can. 

Cushman Motor Work, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 

Alta. 
National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 
National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 
F. E. Myers & Bro.. Ashland, Ohio. 
The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Taylor-Forbes 'Co., Guelph. Ont 
Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Hangers, Barn Door 

Allith Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 
Haneers, Door and Track 

Allith Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Can. 

Peatty Bros., Fergus, Ont 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

Cushman Motor Work, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man, 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling ni. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Hooks, Hat and Coat 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 

Hangers, Storm, Sash and Screen 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain. Conn, 



Hand Taps 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gall. 
Handacrews 

National Machinery & Supply Co., HamUton. 
Harness 

Samuel Trees & Co., Toronto. 
Hardware Specialties 

-^I'itli llfg- Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Belleville Hardware Mfg. Co., Belleville, Ont 

Bndgeport Hdwe. Mlg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Can. foundries & Forgings^ Ltd., BrockviUe. Ont 

Lyons & Marks, Toronto. 

Louis McLain Co., Ltd., Winnipeg Man 

Metal Specialties Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montrea' 
Que. ' 

Straitford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford Ont 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Duluth Show Case Co., Duluth, Minn. 
Hardware Shelving 

Duluth Show Case Co., Duluth, Minn. 
Hardware Store Fittings 

Stratford Brass Co.. Ltd., StratfoixJ. Ont 
Hatchets 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockvillt 
Ont 

-Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, Mich. 
Hasps 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton. 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 
Headlights, Auto 

Canadian Lamp & Stamping Co., Ford, Ont 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Que. 

Heaters 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Onu 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Ltd., Woodstock, Ont 
Heaters, Electric 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont 
Heels and Soles, Rubber 

Dunlop Tiie & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hinges, Strap and Tee 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton, Can. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. 
Hinges, Adjustable Ball 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Hockey Sticks 

J. H. Still Mfg. Co., St Thomaa. 

St Mary's Wood Specialty Co., St. Mary's, Uuu 
Hoes 

Ward & Payne, Sheffield. Eng. 
Hoists 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Works, Ltd., Winnipeg 
Hones 

American Hone Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Horse Singers 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Hones, Razor 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 
Horse Covers, Rubber 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Montreal. 
Horse Nails 

C. Kloepper, Limited, Toronto. Ont 
Horse Shoes 

D. Ackland & Son, Winnipeg. 

C. Kloepper, Limited, Toronto, Ont 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Wilkinson & Kompass, HainUton. 

Horse Shoe Pads 

Dmilop Tire & Uiiblwr Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hose, Fittings and Supplies 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co.. Montreal. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co,, Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toroiiito. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Gutta Percha & Rubber. Ltd., Toronto. 
Hollow Ware 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd.. Brockville, Ont 
Hooks and Sockets 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Ice Scrapers 

James Bros. Co., Perth, Ont. 
Ice Cream Freezers 

Wm. Crane & Sons Co.. Ltd.. Newmarket. Ont 

Tho'. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Montreal. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, P». 
Implement Repairs 

D. Ackland & Son, Ltd., Winnipeg. 
Incubators 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Indicators, Speed 
- H. Disston & Sob, Ltd.. Toronto. 

L. S. Starrett Co.. Athol, Mass. 
Injectors, Automatic 

Jas. Morri.'mn Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Instruments of Precision 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass, 
Iron Enamels 

Boston Varnish Co., Everett Station, Boston. Mass. 
Iron Boards 

J. E. Beairchamp & Co., Montreal. 
Iron. Corrugated 

Baines & Peckover. Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and WinnitM* 
Iron Handles 

Can. Foundries & Forgings. Ltd., Brockville. Ont 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Pronounced "RU" as In RUBY 



jnced^U"as In RUEY^ ^ ^^ 



COSTS MOR£ - WEARS LONGER. 

SOLE CANADIAN MAKERS : 

THE STANDARD PAINT CO. OF CANADA, LIMITED 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCDUv^ER 



Trade-Mark 
Kegistercd 



^FREE— A Counter Display 

that sells 



ENDETZ- 



Ask your jobber for a 
"Mendets" Counter Display. 
Put it where your customers 
will be constantly reminded 
that they need "Mendets" to 
repair leaky graniteware, 
hot water bags, cooking 
utensils and rubber goods of 
all kinds. 

Sales follow as a matter of 
course. 



Ask your jobber to supply you with a Mendet Display Container. It attracts favorable attention and brings 
profitable sales. 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants Who Sell MENDETS:— Whites, Lta., Collingwood, Ont; Wood, Vallance, Ltd., 
-Minnipeg, Man.; Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton, Ont.; Hobbs Hardware Co., Ltd., London. Ont.; D. H. 
Howden & Co., Ltd., London. Ont; Thos. Birkett & Son Co., L.d., Ottawa, Out.; Miller-'Morse Hardware Co., 
Winnipeg, Man.; Marshall Wells Alberta Co., Ltd., -Edmonton, Alta. ; Walter Woods & Co., Winnipeg, 
Man.; Rogers Hardware Co., Ltd., Charlottetown, P.E.L; Thompson & Sutherland, Ltd., North Sydney. 
N.iS. ; Merrick, Anderson Co., Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man.; A. M. Bell & Co., Halifax, N.S. ; J. H. Ashdown 
Hai-dware Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man.; Bond Hardware Co., Guelph, Ont; Emmerson & Fisher, Ltd., St. 
John, N.B. ; R. Chestnut & Sons, Frederioton, NB. ; L. H. Hebert & Co., Montreal, Quebec; Cowan Hard- 
ware Co., 'London, Out.; The Hanbui-y Hardware Co., Brandon, Man.; MoLennan, MoFeely & Co., Ltd., 
VancouTer, B.C.; (Martin, Finlayson & Mather, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C.; Crowell Bros., Halifax, N.S. ; Caver- 
hill, Learmont & Co., Montreal, Que.; Revillon Wholesale Ltd., Edmonton, Alta.; Wood, Vallance & Adams. 
Ltd., Calgary, Alta.; Louis McLain Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man.; Lewis Bros., Dtd., Montreal, Que.; Wood, 
Vallance & Leggat, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C.; Kennedy Hardware Co., Toronto; T. McAvity & Sons, Ltd., St 
John, N.B. ; H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto. 

CoUette Mfg. Company, Collingwood, Ont., Canada 




YOU'LL MAKE MONEY ON THESE 
BECAUSE— 



BLACK DIAMOND Tarred Felt 
JOLIETTE and CYCLONE Brands 
Sheathings, Roofings and all lines of Build- 
ing Paper are of the best material and sure 
to secure repeat orders. 

Saves money for your customers. They'll reciprocate — by giving you their business in other lines. 
We also sell you wrapping papers of all descriptions. 
All kinds of Sheathing made at our own mills. 



-^ 



Our reputation is behind all these Brands. 



ALEX. McARTHUR & COMPANY, LIMITED 



82 McGILL STREET, MONTREAL 



The Oribo Mfg. Co., Limited, Winnipeg, is our Sole Selling 
Agent for the Northwest Provinces 



PINK'S LUMBERING TOOLS 

The Standard Tools in every province of the Dominion, New Zealand, 

Australia, etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of lumber tools. Light and Durable. 

LONG DISTANCE PHONE No. 87 

Send for Catalogue and Price List. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware 

Merchants. 



THE THOS. PINK COMPANY. LIMITED 

Manufacturers of Lumber Tools 
PEMBROKE ONTARIO 




It's a Pink any- 
way you take it, 
and it's the best 
Peavey made. 



86 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



TH E BUYERS' GUIDE 



Iron and Steel Bars 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 

Thos. Birkett & Son (Jo., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Can. Rolling Mills Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Caveiihill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Dominion Iron & Steel Co., Sydney, N.S. 

A. C. Leslie & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills, Ixjndon, Ont 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Works, Winnipeg, MaiL. 

Nora Scotia Steel Co., New Glasgow, N.S. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Iron and Steel, Structural 

Baines & Peckorer, Toronto. 
Irons 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Broekville, OnL 
Irons, Gas and Gasoline 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 

National Stamping & Electric Works, Chicago. 

Royal Iron Mfg. Co., Big Prairie, Oblo. 
Jack Planes 

National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 
Jack Screws 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Broekville. Ont. 
Japans 

Boston Vamish Co., Everett Station, Boston, Mass. 
Kettles 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Broekville. Onl. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Keyhole Saws 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Kitchen Ware 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Kitchen Ware, Transparent 

Coming Glass Works, Coming, N.Y. 
Knife Sharpeners 

J. E. Beauehamp & Co., Montreal. 
Knives, Pocket and Table 

Geo. Butler & Co., Ltd., Sheffield, Eng. 

Jonathan Crookes & Son, Ltd., Sheffield, Eng. 

James Hutton & Co., Montreal. 

Landers, Prary & Clark, New Britain, Conn. 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 
Knives, Sportsmen's 

Maiible Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, Mich. 
Knives, Putty 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
I/sdders, Step. Extention, Store, etc. 

Allith .Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Beatty Bros., Ltd., Fergus, Ont. 

John Calander Mfg. Co., St Paul, Minn. 

Mllbradt Mfg. Co., St Louis, Mo. 

Evan li. Reed Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. 
Lath, Metallic 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Lamps, Nitrogen and Tungsten 

Rasters Jackson Co., Toronto. 

The Canadian Laco-Philips Co., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co.. Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Ohurton & Taylor. Toronto. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 
Lamp Black 

L. Martin Co., New York, N.Y. 

A.' Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 

Wilkes4MartinJWiIckes Co., New York. 
Lamp Chimneys 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Lamp Coloring and Frosting: 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Spielmann Agencies, Ltd., Montreal. 
Lamps, Bicycle and Automhobile 
Dominiop Battery Co., iLtd., Toronto, Ont. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 
Lamps, Lanterns, Electric, Hand 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Domirion Battery Co., Toronto. 

Interstate Electric Novelty Co., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 
Lamps, Tungsten 

Canadian Laco-Ph"ips Co.. Toronto. 

Canadian TiingsteL Lamp Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 
Lamps, Nitrogen 

Canadian Laco-Philips Co., Toronto. 

Canadian Timgsten Lamp Co., Ltd., Hamilton, 
Toronto. Montreal, Winnipeg. 

North American Hardware Co., Idd., Montreal, Q. 
Lamps and Lanterns, Gasoline and Kerosene 

National Stamping & Electric Works. Chicago. 
Ill 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 

Poweriight Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Lanterns. Oil 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Oiitario Lantern & Lamp Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Schultz Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Can. 

B. T. Wright Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Latches 

Can. Foundries & Forgings. Ltd., Broekville, Ont. 

National iM»(r. Co.. Sterling, 111. 
Lathe Dogs, Drop-forged 

Williams & Co.. J. H.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Laundry Tubs, Iron, Plate, Cement 

B)mpire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Lawn Swings 

J. B. Beauehamp & Co., Montreal. 
Lawn Mower* , . .. 

Canada Foundrifs & Forginffa, Ltd Broekville. 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, HI. 

Mllbradt Mtg. lOo., Bterllng, HI. 

Taylor-Fort)es Co., Guelph, Ont. 



8. P. Townsend & Co., Orange, N.J. 
Lead, Black 

Jolm Oakey & Sons, London, Eng. 
Leather Belting and Soles 

Beardmore & Co., Toronto. 
Lead, Sheets and Pipe 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Elmpire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Hoyt Metal Co., Toronto. 

A. O. L«(U« & Co., MontTMl. 
Lead Traps and Bends 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., 'London and Toronto. 

Hoyt Metal Co., Toronto. 
Lace Leather 

Wm. Taylor, Parry Sound, Ont. 
Lead Washers 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Lens 

MoKee Glass Ca, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Stojiglare Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Levels 

H. Disston & Sons, Toronto, 

Goodell-.Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

aianley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Couo. 

i,. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 
Level Glasses 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Lines, Wire, Clothes 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 

Western Wire & Nail Co., London. 
Linoleum Finishes 

Boston Vamish Co., Everett Station, Boston, Ma^. 
Linseed Oil 

Brandram-Henderson, Montreal. 

Dominion Linseed Oil Co., Baden and Toronto 

R, C. Jamieson & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Prairie City Oil Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Locomotive Tools 

William.s & €o., J, H., BrookljTi, N.Y. 
Lumber Tools 

Canadian Warren Axe & Tool Co., St. Cathar- 
ines, Ont. 

Thos. Pink & Co., Pembroke, Ont 
Mantles, Gas 

HamUton Gas Manitle Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Marine Brass Work 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Matches 

E. B. Eddy Co., Hull, Que. 
Mats, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Mauls 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Broekville, Out 
Meat Choppers 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Conn. 
Metal Boxes and Drawers 

Cameron & Campbell, Toronto. 
Metals, Expanded 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto, Ont. 
Metals, Expanded, Ingot. Sheet, Tubes, etc. 

Atlas Metals & Alloys Co., Montreal. 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Hoyt Metal Co,, Toronto. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton, Can. 

A. C. Leslie & Co., Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Metallic, Ceilings, Walls, Roofing, Skylights. 
Siding, Cornices, Ventilators, Valley Windows. 
Doors, etc. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Pedlar People, Oshawa, Ont. 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co., Winnipeg. 
Mica 

A. G. Martin, Ottawa, Ont. 
Menders, Utensils 

Collette Mfg. Co., Collingwood. 

H. Nagle Co., Montreal. 
Meters 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 
Menders, Graniteware, Pot and Pan 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Vol-Peek Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Micrometers 

Goodell-Pratt Co.. Greenfield, Mass. 

L. S. Starrett Co.. Athol. Maw. 

Canadian Fairt>anks-Morse Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Milling Cutters 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Ltd., Dundas. 
Milk Cans 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Mirrors 

Leeks & Potts, !Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., Toronto. 
Mitre Boxes 

Gooflell-Pratt Co.. Greenfield. Mass. 

=<fanlev Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Mitre Box Saws 

H. Di.'wton & Sons, Ltd., Toronto. 
Molasses Gates 

Can. Foundries & Forgings. Ltd., Broekville, Ont. 

Mops , . 

Can. Foimdries & Forgings, Ltd., Broekville, Ont 
Motor Trucks 

Canadian Pneumaitic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Ford Motor Co., Ford Ont. 

Motors 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd,, Toronto. 

Motor Cycles 

Iver Johnson's Anna & Cycle Works, Pltchburg, 
Mass. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., -Montreal, Q. 
Motor Trucks 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd,, Montreal, Q. 



Motor Generators 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Northern Electric Co., Olontreal. 
Nails, Wire 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Colonial Wire Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto. 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Ltd., Hamiltoa. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton, Oat. 

I'armenter & Bulloch, Gananoque, Ont. 

Western Wire & Nail Co., London. 
Nail Pullers 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Nails, Horse Shoe 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton, Oat. 
Neckyokes 

Gregg Mfg. Co., Ltd., Winnipeg; Man. 
Nuts, Thumb 

William.? & Co.. J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Oil Cans 

Cannon Oiler Co., Keithsburg, 111. 
Oil Cake and Meal 

Uommion liinseed Oil Co., Toronto. 
Oil. Coal 

Imperial Oil Co., Toronto. 
Oils, Cylinder 

Prairie City Oil Co., Wiimipeg, Man. 
Oil Hole Covers 

Canadian Winkley Co., Windsor. 
Oil, Motor, Road, Harness, Neatsfoot, Separ- 
ator and gas Engine 

Prairie City Oil Co., iLtd,, Winnipeg, Man. 
Oil Stoves 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Oil Tanks and Pumps 

S. F. Bowser & Co., Inc., Toronilo, Can. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Oilers 

Cannon Oiler Co., Keith^urg, 111. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Sheet .Metal Products Co. of Canada, Toronto. 
Orange Derinders 

J. E. Beauehamp & Co., Montreal. 
Ornamental Tile Roofings 

Metallic Uooting Co., Toronto and Wimupcg. 
Ornaments, Pressed Zinc 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Ornamental Fence 

Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ltd., Hamiltoi, 

McGregor, Banwell Fence Co., Ltd., Walkerville. 
Ornamental Gates 

McGregor, Banwell Fence Co., Ltd., Walkervill. 
Packings 

Oonsumers Cordage Co., MontreaL 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co,, Ltd., Toronto. 

Jenkins ilros., Ltd., Monireal. 

Scythes, Ltd., Toronto. 
Paint, Ready Mixed, Bam, Roof, Flat Wall. 
Concrete, Floor, Cement, Alnminam, MarlB* 

Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

R. C. Jamieeon & Co., Montreal. 

Imperial Vamish & Color Co., Toronto. 

Lowe Bros, Ltd., Toronto. 

Martin-Senour Co., Montreal. 

McArthur-Irwin, Ltd. 

The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 
Sanderson, Pearcy Co., litd., Toronto. 
Standard Paint & Vamish Co., Ltd., Windsor, 

Ont 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

G. F. Stephens Co., Winnipeg. 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Toronto. 
Paint Brushes 

Boeckh Bros., Toronto. 

Meakins & Sons, Hamilton. 

T. S. Simms & Co., St John, N.B. 
Paint and Vamish Remover 

Canada Paint Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Dougall Vamish Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

B. C. Jamieson & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Martin-Senour Co., Ltd., Montreri. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 
Paper Balers 

Climax Baler Co., Hamilton. 

Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 
Parcel Carriers 

Qipe-Hazard Store Service Co., Montreal. 
Paris Green 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

McArthur Irwin, Montreal, 

SherwinWilliams Co., Montreal. 
Paper Bags 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Paper, Wrapping 

Waltea- Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Packing Rubber 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Co., Toronto. 

Outta Percha & Rubber Co., l.td., Toronto. 
Pads 

D. Ackland & Sons, Winnipeg. 
Pads for Horses 

American Pad & Textile Co., Chatham. 

Burlington Windsor Blanket Co., Toronto. 
PaiU 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Soren Bros., Toronto. 
Pails, Wooden 

Wm. Cane & Sons Co., Ltd., Newmarket, Ont 
Perforated Sheet Metals 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., iHamllton. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MADE rN CANADA 





OILS 



These are a few of our most staple lines, so well and favorably 
known throughout Western Canada, and are sold only through 
reliable merchants. 



HARNESS OIL 
NEATSFOOT OIL 



Special Cylinder 
Oil (for steam en- 
gines). 

A Gas Engine Oil 
(for gasoline en- 
gines). 

Tractorlene O i 1 
(for oil burning 
engines). 

Ideal Thresher's 
Machines Oil (for 
general use). 
Automobile O i 1 
and Transmission 
Greases. 



PRAIRIE CITY OIL COMPANY, LIMITED, WINNIPEG 



MADE IN CANADA 



I 




E. Roy, 
65M St. Andre St.. Montreal. Que. 



C. C. Ca 
85 W 



rtwright, 

Iter St., Winnipeg, Man. 




f 



MADE 

IN 



CANADA 




4 



Good Reasons 

—READ EM! 



THE NORTHERN BOLT, SCREW AND WIRE COMPANY, LIMITED 



Why you should sell Rolled Thread Bolts and 
Screws : 



BETTER QUALITY— Rolled Thread Bolts can 
only be made from first quality Basic Open- 
Hearth Stock. 

STRONGER— Actual tests show 13 per oent. 
greater strength than Cut Thread Bolts. 

NO USELESS WEIGHT— Shanks are unaUu 
than threads. No useless weight to pay freight 
on. 

BIG PlRaiS ADOPTING THEM— Some of the 
largest users on the oontinenit will accept noth- 
ing else— and they always investigate before 
aotiug. 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



TTARDWARE BUSINESS WANTED — IN 
•'--'- good Ontario town or city. Replle* 
treated strictly confidential. Box 167, Hard- 
ware and Metal, Toronto. 



This little advertisement inserted 
in Hardware and Metal not long 
ago immediately brought eleven 
replies to the advertiser. And the 
cost was only 47 cents, including 
5 cents for Box Number. 



USE THE WANT AD PAGE 



PXH 



TRADE MARK 



FILES 



HARD AS A DIAMOND 
AND 
STRAIGHT AS A STRING 

TWO BRANDS 

ONE QUALITY— THE BEST 

They Cut Faster and Wear Longer 



PORT HOPE FILE MFG. CO., 

LIMITED 

PORT HOPE - ONTARIO 
"Ask your jobber" 



-^n^u 



TRADE MARK 



88 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



July 6, 1918 



Percolators, Coffe« 

Canadian General Eletric Co., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Mat 

Landers, Frair & dark. New Britain, Conn. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Pick Handles 

J. H. Still Mfg. Co., St. Thomas, Ont 
Pickling Machines 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Piston Rod Pocking 

Dimlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Pistols 

Iyer Johnson's Anns & Cycle Works, Fltchbmii 
Mass. 
Phosphor Tin and Copper 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Phonographs 

Canadian Phonoeraph & Sapphire Disc C*. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Dominion Sewing Machlne-PhoDOgrapb C«., WU, 
nipeg 
Pig Iron 

A. C. Leslie & Co.. Ltd.. Montreal 

Nova Scotia Steel Co., New Glasgow, N.fi. 

St«el Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Pins, Escutcheon 

Parmenter & Bulloch, Gantnoque 

Pipe Cutters (Stand) 

TrimoBt Mfg. Co., Roibury (Boston). Mass. 
Pipe Stoclis and Dies 

Wells Bros. Co.. of Canada, Ltd., Qalt 
Pipe, Black and Galvanized 

American Rolling Mills. Middletown, Ohio, 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Caverhill. Lcarmont & Co., Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Ltd., Montreal. 

Irfwis Bros.. Ltd.. Alontreal 

Pease Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Pipe. Galvanized, Conductor 

Metallic Kooflng Oo., Toronto and Winnipeg 

Pedlar People, Ltd., Oshawa 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Wheeler & Bain, Toronto. 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co.. Winnipeg 

Winnipeg Steel Granary Co., Winnii)eg. 
Pipe, Lead 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 

Hoyt Metal Co., Toronto 
Pipe. Stove 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Soren Bros., Toronto 
Pipe, Rain Water Conductor 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto 

Pliers. Cutting 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn 

Pliers, Combination 

Frideeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp.. Bridgeport, Conn 
Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

Plowshares 

D. Ackland & Son, Winnipeg 

Plugs, Rubber 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Montreal 

Plumbers' Tools 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Plumbers' Supplies, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods O., Ltd., Toronto 

Planes 

Caverhill, I,earmont & Co., Montreal 
National Machinery ft Supply Co., Hamilton. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Plates, Plain and Chequererd 
Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 

Polishes 

Buffalo Specialty Co., Bufifalo, N.T. 

Channel Chemical Co., Toronito. 
Polishing Heads 

GoodelliPratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Polishes, Knife 

Jno. Oakey & Sons, London, Bng. 
Poles, Electric Light 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal 
Pole Line Material 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Great Wefrt Electric Co.. Ltd.. Winnipeg. Man. 

Sorthem Electric Co.. Montreal 

Pedlar People Ltd.. Oshawa 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Portable Coal Baskets 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Poultry Netting 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

A. C. Lenlie & Co.. Ltd., Montreal 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., HamfltoD. 
Poultry Leg Bands 

RIdeau Specialty Co., Smith's Falls, Ont. 
Pulls 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockrllle, Ont. 
Pumps 

Beatty Bros.. Ltd.. Fergus 

Can. Foundries & Forglnes, Ltd., Brockville. Ont 

Empire Mfg. Co., London. Ont 

R. McDougall Co.. Ltd., Gait 

F. E. Myers & Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Pump Oilers 

Cannon Oiler Co.. Keithsburg, Til. 
Punches. Centre Drive, etc. 

Ooodell-Pratt Co., OreenflsW. Mass 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., PhflsdelpM*. P». 

SUnley Rule A Level Co., New Britain. Conn 
Punches. Ticket 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 



Putty 

Brandram-Henderson, Montreal. 

R. C. Jamieson & Co., X/td., Montreal 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Ltd., Toronto 

A. Kajnsay & Son Co., Montreal 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

G. F. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal 
Pneumatic Tubes 

Gipe Hazard Store Service Co,, Toronto 
Pulleys 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockvllle 
Quoits 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockvllle, Ont. 
Racks. Hay 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockvllle, Ont. 
Radiators 

Empire ilfg. Co., London, Ont 
Radiator Valves 

Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Railings. Brass 
Railroad Supplies. Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Oj., Ltd., Toronto. 

Jae. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Rakes 

Doust Specialty Co., Toronto. 

Ward & I'ayne, Sheffield, Eng. 
Razors 

Auto-Strop Safety Razor Co., Toronto 

Geo. Butler & Co., Ltd., She.. eld, Eng. 

Caverhill. Learmont & Co., Montreal 

James Hutton & Co., Montreal 

Gillette Safety Razor Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Landers, Frary & Clark. New Britain, Conn. 

Wilkinson Sword Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Reamers 

Tratt & Whitney Co.. Ltd., Dundas 

Butterfield & Co., Rock Island, Que. 
Ratchet Drills 

Onodell-Pratt Co.. Greenfield, Mass. 
Reciprocating Drills 

Ooodpll-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Refrigerators 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Renfrew Refrigerator Co., 'Renfrew, Ont. 

Snren Bros.. Toronto 
Refrigerator Hardware 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Registers 

Barton Netting Co., Ltd.. Windsor. Ont 
Canada Foundries ft Forgings, Brockrllle 

Enterprise Mfg. Co.. Sackville. N.B. 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont 
Rifles 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., Worcester 
Mass. 
Rivets 

Parmenter Bulloch Co., Gananoque, Ont. 
Roadlighters 

n. A. Shaler Co. 
Roofing. Ready 

Bird & Son, Hamilton. Can. 

nishopric Wall Board Co., Ltd., OWawa, Ont. 

Ttios. Birkptt & Son Co.. Ltd.. Ottawa. 

Brantford Roofing Co., Ltd.. Brentford, Ont 

Canadian Roofing Co.. Ltd.. Windsor, Ont 

Standard Paint Co., of Canada, [Ltd., Montreal 
Rules 

Jas. Chesterman & Co., She. eld, Eng. 

Lufkin Rule Co., Windsor, Ont. 

L. a. Starrett Co., Aithol, Mass. 
Saws, Hand and Circular 

E. C Atkins Co., Hamilton, Can. 

Kenry Diwton & Sons. Toronto. 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Montreal. 
Scoops 

Canadian Shovel & Tool Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Screws 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville. On! 
Screws, Thumb 

William.s & Cn.. J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Screw and Bolt Cases 

Duluth Show Case Co., Duluth, Minn. 
Screw Machines 

Stratford Bra-ss Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont 
Shades. Electric 

Canadian General Electric (3o., Toronta. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. 5Ta-i. 
Sheeting 

McArthur & Co.. Alex., Montreal, Que. 
Sheets. Galvanized and Black 

American Rolling Mills, Middleton, Ohio. 

Baines & Pcckovpr, Toronto. 

A. C. Leslie & Co., Montreal, 0"e. 

Dominion Sheet "Metal Co., HamiWon. 

M. & L. Samuel Benjamin Co.. Toronto. 

P. Jfe S. H. Thompson, Montreal, Que. 
Shovels 
J. E. Beauchamp & Co., Montreal, Que. 

Canadian Shovel & Tool Co.. Hamilton. Can 
D. F. Jones Mfg. Co., Ltd., Gananoque, Ont. 
Show Cases 

Duluth Show Case (Jo., Duluth, Minn. 
Silo Lners 

Otterville Mfg. Co., Otterville. Ont 
Sinks 

Can. Foundries & Forffings, Ltd., Brockvllle. On' 

TTmpire Mfr Co.. London, Ont. 
Silver Plated Ware 

Canadian Wm. A. Rogers Co.. Torrmtn. 

Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls. Ont. 
Solder 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto 

Empire Mfg. Co., London and Toronto 
TToTt Metnl Co.. Toronto 
Northern Electric Co., Montreal 

Owl Metal C6., Ltd., Winnipeg 

Geo. W. Reed, Montreal 

Ttllman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton, Ont. 



Soldering Paste 

Canada Jletal Co., Toronto 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Solderall 

Thos Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Soap Dishes 

Kiuzinger Bruce & Co., Niagara Falls, Ont 
Spades 

Canadian Shovel & Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Erie iron Works, St. Thomas, Ont 
Spark Plugs 

Canadian Carbon Co., Ltd.. Toronto 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co., Ltd., Weston, Oat 

Canada Sales Co., Toronto, Can. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Champion Spark Plug Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Dominion BatteiT Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Eclipse .Mfg. Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

\V. T. Evans, 1684 St Urbain St, Montreal 

Hyslop Bros., Toronto 

Interstate Electric Novelty Co., Montreal 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Sharp Spark Plug Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 
Spanners 

Willi.im.s & Co., J. H., Brookl.vn, X.Y. 
Spiders 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Oot 
Spoke Shaves 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Sponge Baskets 

Kinzinger, Bruce & Co.. Niagara FaUs, Ont 
Sprayers 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd,, Montreal. 

Eureka Planter Co., Woodstock 
Springs 

B. J. Coghlin Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Spring Dies 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait 
Stable Fittings 

Beatty Bros., Fergus, Ont 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockrllle. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Stains 

Brandram-Henderson, Montreal 

Canada Paint Co.. Ltd., Montreal 

Dougall Varnish Co., Ltd., Montreal 

The Lowe Bros. Co.. Toronto 

R. C. Jamieson & CIo., Ltd., Montreal 

Martin-Senour Co., Ltd., Montreal 

McArthur-Irwin, Ltd. 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Ltd., Toronto 

A. Ramsay & Sons C!o., Montreal 

The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa. 

Sanderson Pearcy & Co., Toronto. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal 

Standard Paint & Varnish Co., Windsor Ont. 

.Spielman Agencies Ltd., Montreal 

G. F. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg 
Staples 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton 

National Mfg. Co., Steriing. HI. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton 

Western Wire & Nail Co.. London 
Store Fixtures 

Cameron & Campbell. Toronto. 

Milbradt Mfg. Co.. Siteriing, 111. 

Walker Bin & Store Fixture Co., Kitchener, Ont. 
Stoves 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne. Hamilton. Can. 

Canada Foundries & Forgings. Brockvllle. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. <3o.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Enterprise Foundry Co.. Sackville, N.B. 

Gnmey Foundry Co.. Toronto 

Hoosier Stove Co., Marion, Ind. 

McClary Mfe. Co., London. Ont 

.Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary. 
Alta. 

Record FoimdVv & Machine Co., Moneton. N.B. 

Jas. Stewart Mfe. Co., Ltd., Woodstock 
Stoves, Ffreless Cook 

Louis MdLain Co.. Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man. 
Stoves and Ranges, Electric 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont 
Stoves. Gasoline 

National Stamping & Electric Works, (Jhlcago 
Stove Lining 

Geo. W. Reed, Montreal. 
Stove Pipe 
Collins Mfe. Co.. Toronto 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co.. L'd.. Mnntre«t 
Sheet Met.nl Products Co. of Canada, Toronto. 
Stretchers, Wire 

Bnnwell Honie Wire Fence Co., Ltd.. H«»n«tnT. 
Merr-hants Hardware Specialltdes, Ltd., Calgary. 
Alta. 

Steel. Reinforcing 

Baines & Peekover_ Toronto. 
Canadian Rolling Mills Co., Ltd., Montrwil 
Canadian Tube & Iron Co.. Ltd., Montreal 
London Rolling Mill Co.. London. Ont. 
Manitoba Rolling Mills Co., WlnBli>eg 

Steel. Strip 

Baines & Peckover. Toronto, 'Ont. 
Dominion Sheet Metal Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Stencils and Ink 
Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Co.. Hamilton 

Steamers and Boilers 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Steel Bending Brakes 

Steel Bending Brake Works. Chatham 
Steel. Mild, Sleigh Shoe, Tire 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto, Ont 
Canadian Rolllag Mills Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Canadian Tnt>e & Iron Co.. Ltd., Montreal 
London Rolling Mill Co., London, Ont 
Manitoba Rolling Mills Co., Winnipeg 
Steel Co. of Canada, Hamlltott 



July 6, 1918 HARD W A R E A N D M E T A L 89 



ORDER 
NOW FOR 

FALL TRADE 



-Caverhill, Learmont Mail Orders- 

We wish to impress upon the trade the 
importance of ordering suppHes for Fall 
right now, for several good reasons. 

Here are timely suggestions for brisk Fall 
business — - all of highest quality and 
finish : 

Cow Ties Wicks 

Small Fixtures Axes 

Lanterns Axe Handles 

Lamps Etc. 

Goods purchased from Caverhill-Lear- 
mont are guaranteed to meet the require- 
ments of your most exacting customer. 

We urge your order early from 
"The Mail Order House with a Reputa- 
tion to Maintain for Reliability and 
Service." 

CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO. 

MONTREAL 



90 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Jaly 6, 1918 



THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



stays. Friction 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Stools 

ETan L. Reed Mfg. Co., aterling, HI. 
STUCCO BOARD 

Bishopric Wall Board Co., Iitd., Ottawa, Ont. 

Swc-St P&ds 

American Pad & Textile Co.. Chatham 
Biirling'ton Windsor Blanket Co., Toronto. 

Switches, Switchboards 
Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Great Weet Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Northern Electric Co., Montreal. 

Supply Pipes, Iron and Brass, Bath and Basin 
Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Talking Machines 

Dominion Sewing Machine & Phonograph Co. 
Winnipeg 
Tanlcs, Cistern 

Can. Foundries k Forgings, Ltd., BrockTille, Oni- 

Tanks, Galranlzed BtMl 

Km^ra Jdtg, Co., London and Toronto 

Winnipeg Ceiling & RooOng Co., Winnipeg 
Taps 

Batterfleld t Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Pratt ft Whitney Oo., Dundaa, Ont 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Oalt, Ont. 
Tap Holdara 

Ooodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, iidM. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tapping Attachments 

Pratt ft Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont 
Wdls Bros, ot Canada, Oalt 
Tape, Rubber Friction 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Tapes, Heasnring 

OaTerhill. Learmont ft Co., Montreal 

Jaa. Cheeterman 4 Co., Ltd., Sheffield, Eng. 

Lufkln Rule Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont 

L. S. Starreitt Co., Athol, Mass. 
Tea Pota and Urns, Tea Ball 

Landera, Frary & dark. New Britain, Conn. 
Tern* Plates 

A. 0. Leslie ft Co.. Ltd., Montreal 

Thimbles, Smoke Pipe 

Can. Foundries & Forglngs, Ltd.. Brockrille. Ont 
Tiling, Walls and Floor 

Barton Netting Co., Windsor 
Tiling, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber (Joods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Outta Perdha ft Rubber Co., Ltd.. Turonto. 
Tinsmiths' Machinery 

Brown, Boggs Co., Hamilton. Ont. 

Steel Bending Brake Works. Chatham. 

Tire Carriers, Automobile 

Klnringer Bruce * Co.. Niagara Fall*. Ont. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Tires and Tubes, Automobile and Motor TrucK 

Canadian Consolidated Rubl>er Co.. Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Ruiyber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gutta Percha A Rubber Co., Toronto. 

MoOraw Tire ft Rubber Co.. Bast Palestine. >> 

North American Hai-dware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Tires and Tubes, Bicycle 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Tire Accessories 

Dunlop Tiie & RulAer Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Trucks 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Truck Supplies 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co.. Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Tools 

Buck Bros., Millbury. Mass. 

Canadian Fairtianka^Morse Co.. Ltd.. .Montreal. 

las. Oheaterman & Co., Ltd.. Sheffield, Eng. 

B. J. Coghlin Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Northern Blectrio Co., Montreal. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Pratt & Whitney, Dundas, Ont. 

Ward & Payne, Sheffield, Eng. 
Tools. Garden 

Eureka Planter Co., Woodstock 

Ward A Payne, Sheffl«l«, EJng. 
Tools, H arrest 

Beatty Bros., Ltd., Fergus. Ont. 

F. K. Myere ft Bre., Ashland, O. 
Tool Holders 

Williams & Co., .T. H., BrookljTi, N.T. 
Toys 

American Flyer Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

J. X. Beanchamp ft Co., Montreal 

A. C. Gilbert Co., New Haven. Conn. 
Tools, Blacksmiths' 

D. Ackland * Bon. Winnipeg. 
Tools. Machinists' 

L. 8. SUrrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Maas. 

Jas. Chesterman ft Co., Ltd., Sheffield. Eng. 

Tools. Woodworkers' 

National Machinery ft Supply Co., Hamilton 

Towel Bars _ „ . ^ 

Klnslsger Bnice ft Co.. Niagara Falls. Ont 

Newell Mfg. Co., Presoott, Ont 
Traps, Brass. Iron, Lead 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

Traps. Game 

Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls, Ont 

Troughs 

Beatty Bros., Fergus, Ont 



trammel Points 

Stanley Rule ft Lerel Co., New Britain. Conn. 

Trowels 
H. DisBton ft Sons, Toronto 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp.. Bridgei>ort, Conn 
Ward ft Payne, Sheffield, Jbif. 

Trucks, Warehouse 

Canada Foundries ft Forglngs, Brookrille 
John Watson (Mfg. Co., Ltd., Winnii>eg, Man. 

Try Squares 
Henry Disston ft Sons Co., Toronto 
Stanley Rule ft Lerel Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Tniing Devices 

Cleveland Stone Co., Clereland, Ohio 

Tungsten Lamps 

Canadian Tungsten Lamp Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Canadian Laco-Phlllips Co., Toronto 
Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipec. ^lan 
North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 

Turning Tools 

Buck Bros., Milbury, Mass. 
Ward & Payne, Sheffield, Eng. 

Tabs 

Wia. Cane & Sons Co., Litd., Newmarket, Ont 

Tumbler Holders 

Kinsinger Bruce ft Co., Niagara Falls, Ont 
Tubing, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Tubing, Steel 

Standard Tube & Fence Co., Woodstock 
Twines 

Consumers Cordage Co., Montreal 

Scythes & Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton 
Valve Stamps 

William.s & Co., .1. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Valves, Standard, Globe, Angle and Check 

Canadian FairbanksJMorse Co., Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

Jenkins Bros., Montreal, Que. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

T. McAvity & Sons, Ltd., St John. N.B. 

Penberthy Injector Co., Limited. Windsor, Ont. 

United Brass Founders, Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 
Valves, Radiator and Air, Iron Body, Com- 
position, Globe, Angle, Check 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. Que. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

Jenkins Brass Co., Montreal, Qne. 

Jas, Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

T. McAvity & Sons, Ltd., St. John, N.B. 

Penbenthy Injector Co., Limited, Windsor, Ont. 

United Brass Founders. Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 
Varnishes 

Berry Bros., Walkerville 

Boston Varnish Co., Everett Station. Boston. 

Brandram-Henderson, Montreal 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal 

Dougall Varnish Co., Ltd., Montreal 

McArthur Ii-win. Montreal 

Martin-Senour Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Ltd., Toronto 

A. Ramsay & Son, Montreal 

R. C. Jamieson & Co., Montreal 

Pratt & Lambert, Bridgeburg, Ont. 

Sanderson. Pearcy & Co., Toronto. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal 

G. F. Stephens ft Co., Ltd., Winnipeg 

Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa. 

Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton 
■\^"»^tr'p«!. Business 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Ventillators. Metallic 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg 

Winnipeg Ceiling ft Roofing Co., Winnipeg 

Vises 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 
Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 
Caverhill. Learmont ft Co., Montreal 
Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
National Machinery ft Supply Co., Hamilton 
North Bros. Mfe. Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co.. New Britain. Conn. 
Vises. Pipe 

Wi;iiam.'5 & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Vulcanizers 

Adamson ATfff. Co.. Hamilton 
N'orthem Electric Co.. Montreal 
C. A. ShaJer Co., Waiipun. Wis. 
Wagon Hardware 

Gregg Mfg. Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Wagons 

Woodstock Wagon Mfg. Co.. Woodstock, Ont. 

WALLBOARD 

Bishopric Wall Board Co., Ltd., Ottawa, Ont. 

Warmers, Foot 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago, HI. 

Washers 

Beanchamp & Co., J. E., Montreal, Que. 

c. Klnepter. Ltd.. Toronto 

The Stanley Works. New Britain, Conn. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton 

Washers, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 



Washing Machines, Electric, Hand and Powsr 

Beatty Bros., Fergus, Ont 

Canadian Wooden ware Co., St. Thraaas, Ont. 

J. H. Connor & Son, Ltd., Ottawa 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Dowsmell, Lees ft Co., Hamilton. 

Great West BHectric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Maytag Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Merchants Hardware Specialties, Ltd., Calgary, 

Alta. 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal 

Waste, Cotton 

Acme Waste Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Scythes & Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton 
Wash Boards 

Canadian Woodenware Co., St llKHaaa, Ost. 
Wm. Cane & Sons Co., Ltd., Newmarket, Ont 

Water Supply Systems 

Em,pire Mfg. Co., Iiondon, Ont 
Weather Stripping 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Swan Mfg. Co., Winnipeg 
Wedges 
Can. Foundries ft Forgings, £,td., BroekrlUe, Ost 
Canadian Warren Axe ft Too! Co., 8t Oitbai^ 
ines, On;t. 

Whitewash OntfiU 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Spramotor Co., London, Ont. 

Weeders, Garden (hand) 
J. E. GUson Mfg. Co., Port Washinoton. Vi*. 
C. S. Norcross & Sons, Bushnell, lu. 

Weights 
Can. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd., BrockrlU*, Ont 

WheeU, Well 

Can. Foundries ft Forglngs, Ltd., Braakyille, Oat 
Wholesale Hardware 

Thos. Birkett & Co., Ottawa, Ont. 

Caverhill. Learmont ft Co., Montreal 

Frothingham ft Workman, Montreal 

H. S. Howland Sons & Co., Toronto. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 

Miller-iMorse Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Rice, Lewis & Sons, Ltd., Toronto 

White's, Ltd., Collingwood, Ont 
White Lead 

Brandram-Hendereon, Montreal 

Canada Paint Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Carter White Lead Co., Montreal 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamllten 

McArthur Irwin, Montreal 

Windows, Kalameined 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Wiaalpeg 

Windshields 

Leeks ft Potts, Hamilton, Ont. 

Wire Cloth 

B. Greening Wire Cloth Co., Ltd., HuaUtoa 

Wire Cutters 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Northern Electric Co., Montreal 

Wire Hoops 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., HamQton 

Wire 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Caverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal 

B. Greening Wire Cloth Co., Ltd., Hamlltsa 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Ltd., HamUton 

Lewis Bros.. Ltd., Montreal 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal 

Northern Bolt Screw & Wire Co., Owen Bound 

Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton 

Western Wire & Nail Co., London 
Wire Mats 

B. Greening Wire Cloth Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Wheels 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Wire Rope 

Baines ft Peckover, Toronto. 
Wrapping Paper 

JIcArthur & Co., Alex., Montreal, Que. 
Wrenches and Accessories 

Can. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd., BroekrlUe. Ont 

Ooodell-Pratt Co.. Greenfield, Mass. 

Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo. N.T. 

L. 3. Starratt Co., Athol, Ma.ss. 

Trimont Mfg. Co.. Roxbiiry. Mass. 

Will B. Lane. Chicago, 111. 

.T. H. WUliama Co., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Wrench Sets 

William.s & Co.. J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Wrenches, Alligator 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Oonn. 
Wrenches, Ratchet 

L. S. Starretb Co., Athol, Mass. 

Spielman Agencies, Montreal 
Wrought Nipples 

Canadian Tube ft Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Wrought Couplings 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Wringers. Hand and Power 

Beatty Bros., Fergus. Ont 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal 

Dowswell, Lees ft Co., Hamilton. 

J. H. Connor & Sons, Ltd.. Ottawa 

T,ewis Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal 

Merchants Hardware Specialties, Ltd., Calgary. 
Alta. 
Zinc. Bar 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND MET A L 



31 



Sell Handles that 

are Most in 

Demand 

STILL'S 



There are more of STILL'S HANDLES sold in 
Canada than any other make. What's the 
logical conclusion of this fact? — they are the 
best. 

There's a Still Handle to meet every need : Axe, 
Pick, Sledge and Hammer Handles; Cant 
Hook and Peavie Handles. 

There's nothing like selling the best of every- 
thing. Good profits in our handles, too. 

J. H. Still Mfg. Company 

ST. THOMAS -:- ONTARIO 



A DVERTISING to be 
"^^ successful does not neces- 
sarily have to produce a basket- 
ful of inquiries every day. 

The best advertising is the 
kind that leaves an indelible, 
ineffaceable impression of the 
goods advertised on the minds 
of the greatest possible number 
of probable buyers, present and 
future. 




For Cool Bearings 

Let us convince you that our lines 
are distinctive in quality and ser- 
vice. Send us a trial order. 



OIV4 






STOVER 
HARDWARE 

This popular hardware is salable 
during all seasons of the year. Many 
items are suitable for 10 to 25c 
counters. The quality is the best 
and will make your stock more 
attractive to the trade. 

Send for our new catalog, P-17. 
Some of the articles it shows are: 




Mop sticks 
Fireplace fixtures 
Latches 

Ice Picks & Shaves 
Chest Handles 
Saw Vises 
Cast Hatchets 
Lemon Squeezers 
House Numbers 



Stove Trimmings 
Pulleys (all kinds) 
Coat & Harness 

Hooks 
Hinges 

Lamp Brackets 
Waffle Irons 
Door Pulls 
Nut Crackers 




WE ALSO MAKE 
Wind Mills. Feed Mills, Ensilage Cutters 
and Gasoline Engines. 

STOVER MFG. & ENGINE CO x^ 




Freeport, IH. 

Canadian Agents: 

Duncan & Cadman, ^ 

618 Mclntyre Block, • «! 

Winnipeg. ^ '^ 

G. L. Cohoon, 11 ^ ^^°- 

St. Sacrament St., ^-o-' e, 
Montreal. ^ ^<^ 

cf ^*<^ ^<^^ ,^ ..■ 









92 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



Just where do we stand? 



CANADIANS are beginning to wonder where 
we stand with reference to our place in the 
Empire after the war. Are we to rank as full 
partners in this grand, big, going concern? Are 
we to pay our share of the upkeep of the navy? 
If not, what is to be our status? 

Recognizing the growing interest in this problem, 
the editors of MACLEAN'S decided to devote the 
July issue to Imperial topics. It offers articles on 
various phases of our Imperial problem — articles 
which will have a particular interest at this time 
when Sir Robert Borden is in London in consul- 
tation with the leaders of the Imperial Govern- 
ment. 

The July issue contains, besides, a cluster of 
other big features — readable, fearless and strong. 
Here are a few of the best: 




Kieid-iVlarshal Sir Douglas Haie. 



Imperial Topics 
The War 



Fiction 



1.. 



"Pocketing Our Imperial Pride" By h. g. weiis 

"Canada's New Place in the Empire" 



Living Up to Our Reputation" 



By Prof. P. M. 
By Agnes 



Kennedy 
C. Laut 



"Your Old Uncle Sam is Coming Right Back 

or You" By Lieut.-Col. J. B. Maclean 

"Stemming the Teuton Tide" By Geo. Pearson 

"The Strange Adventure of the Open Door" 

By Arthur Stringer 

"The Three Sapphires" 
"The Torby Tragedy" 
"The Magic Makers" 
"Lennix Ballister — Diplomat" 



By W. A. Fraser 

By A. C. AUenson 

By Alan Sullivan 

By Archie P. McKishnie 



All the regular features as well— Review of Reviews, The Best 
Books, The Business Outlook, The Investment Situation, Women 
and Their Work. 

July MacLean's 



^'Canada's National Magazine" 



At All News Stands 



20 Cents 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



93 



The Pump on the Threshing 
Tank should be a 

MYERS 

for in Myers Tank Pump is foimri 
niimping seriice of exceptional merit 
inasmuch as Myers Cog Gear Double 
Acting .L<nv Down Tanli Pumps operate 
j3 1/3 % easier, liave laiger capacity 
and last much longer than the ordin- 
ary eyei-y day tank pump. 
'Myers Tank Pumps are built for hand 
or power operation, in several 
styles, and are distributed 
bv leading jobbers through- 
n it Canada. 

It's an eaey matter 
for you to get i:hem 
quickly, just as it is 
for you to sell them. 
Circulars and name 
of Jobber gladly 
supplied. 

F. E. Myers & Bro. 

Ashland, Ohio 




OAKEY'S 

The original and only 

Genuine Preparation 

for cleaning Cutlery 

'WBLUNGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

Manutaoturc-ra of 

Emery, Black Lead, Kmery Glass 
and Flint Cloths wid Papers, etc. 




Wellington Mills, London, S. E.I. ,Eng. 




Malleable Iron Lugs 

SILOS TANKS 
WOOD PIPE LINES 

Variety of patterns, using round 
and flat bands. 

Otterville Manufacturing' Co. 

LIMITED 
OTTERVILLE. ONT. 



^>^ms^isxfJSS*Jismse&>£ssss<i!:(ss 



If you want easy-fit- 
ting eavetrough and ' 
conductor pipe, etc., 
order from us, 

WHEELER & BAIN 

TORONTO 




ON DON BAR IRON 



is the best line of bar iron 
that money can buy. It pos- 
sesses a uniformity of tex- 
ture, toughness, and easy 
workability that means per- 
fect satisfaction both to you 
and to your customers. And 
the price is as low as we can 
make it without sacrificing 
anything of its quality. 



London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd, 

LONDON CANADA 

SALES AGENTS 
Manitoba — Bissett & Webb, Limited, Winnipeg 
British Columbia — McPherson & 
Teetzel, Vancouver 





To be obtained 

from Dealers in Glas*, 

Hardware and Painters' Supplie* 

X<..t.: A, RtMStr 6 SON COMPANY, Moilreat 

Glaziers' DiamQnds 






Wall Cases, Shelving, Display Counters, 
Nail Bin Counters, Screw Cases — all kinds 
of Store Fittings. r 



CAMERON U CAMPBELL. 

Toronto, Canada 




L METALS 



Hardware Dealers who at one time hesitated on the Bab- 
bitt Metal question now find that Owl Metals pay the rent 
Try selling Owl Traction Babbitt for Tractors. Owl Bab- 
bitt Metal for Thrashers. 

OWL METAL CO., LIMITED, WINNIPEG 



94 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 




Our Grades 

Colored— Nos. IB, 1 A, 7, 1, 5 
White— Nos. Jap, XC, X, XX, XXX 



Write for and compare 
our prices with others 

ACME WASTE MFG. CO. 

LIMITED 
482 WELLINGTON ST. W., TORONTO 

S Queen Street, Montreal 1206 McArthur Bldg., Winnipeg 




This is the trade- 
mark to look for in 
buying your Hard- 
ware, Wooden- 
ware, Sporting 
Goods, Automo- 
bile Supplies, Toys 
and Games. 

Oar complete catalogue will be mailed on request 

E. BEAUCHAMP & CO. 

MONTREAL 

Agents : 
R. G. Bedlington & Co., Vancouver, B. C. 
Lynch & Manly, - Toronto, Ont. 



J. 



C. KLOEPFER, LIMITED 

Edward Halloran, Manager 

44-50 Wellington Street East, TORONTO 
And at Guelph 

IRON and STEEL 

HEAVY HARDWARE 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 



PEERLESS ORNAMENTAL FENCING 



A Big Trade Is Waiting for You. 

YOUR business will jump to the front the minute you display Peerless 
Fencing:. In price, quality, designs and actual worth you can 
guarantee every foot of it. We stand back of you. 
Open hearth steel wire, crimped springy liorizontai wires combine 
to make the Peerless fence outlast ordinary kinds of fencing. Defies rust, 
holds unruly nniraals. can't sas, can'tbreak 
down and is the last word in economy. 

Send for Dealer's Proposition 

Get our illustrated literature showing the big 
line for residence, park, cemetery, farm, 
ranch, poultry yard and all purpose fenc- 
ing and gates. Write today. 

BANWELL-HOIIE WISE FENCE CO., Ltd. 

WINNIPEG, HAMILTON. 



MAN. 



ONT. 






liMii!M MiMiH!yiiiiyiM'»j< 
biiiiiiniinii 

)ll!lll!IIRII!!ll!!ll!raII 

"n/jmniiirnuimimm: 
niiiinimmmr ^ 



'Jirii iTMinnr aariaiBiiiiiK imK^^ 
.jniiiii iiinnnmnpBiii iiiiMiiii~~^ 
[EM iinmi Hmwiiimmi 

nnranniiiimiiraiiiniiitiiiirnnuDMnminmD 

iniiiiiinuiniiiinimiiiiiimioiiiiininnnniiiuiD"' 



Wilkinson &KOMPASS 

TORONTO HAMILTON Winnipeg 

IRON AND STEEL 

HEAVY HARDWARE 

MILL SUPPLIES 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 

WE SHIP PROMPTLY 




Order Guaranteed Goods, Mr. Dealer. 

When dealers order Best's Linoleum or Oilcloth Bindings they 
know that they are ordering goods that carry the gaarantee of 
a substantial Canaoian firm. 

Be sure and specify "Best's" and you'll get it. 

BEST WEATHER STRIP CO., LIMITED 

HAMILTON, CANADA 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



95 



Look for the full name 

Russell Jennings 

stamped on the round of our 

Auger Bits 

The original double twist auger bit, patented by 
Mr. Russell Jennings in 1855 

Russell Jennings Mfg. Co. 

CHESTER, CONN., U.S.A. 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. ^™^^-^ 

Avoid imitations of our eTt^^ ^C At 

CUTLERY ^^''Vj^ cry^ 

By seeing that this exact ^^1 ^^^L. 

mark is on each blade Gca^. . r ftt* 

SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton (^ Company 

MONTREAL 



The 

Superior All Round 

GLUE 

You'll find that Glue sold in packages meets with much favor 
with the consumer — that's "Brantford" Glue. Very economical. 
Put up in Yi, % and 1 lb. packages. 
Buy from your jobber. 



CANADA GLUE CO., Limited 



Brantford, Ontario. 




GERMANTOWN 

LAMPBLACK 



THE L. MARTIN CO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

LAMPBLACK 

IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA 

Originators- of Eagle, Old Standard, Globe and 
Pyramid Germantown Brands. 
Suppliers of Bulk Blacks to the highest class 
Grinding Trade. 

THE L, MARTIN CO. 

Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, New York, 

Philadelphia, London, Eng. 



For sale by 
Leading 
Wholesale 
Houses. 




CorpQfiate Mark 




Granted 178a 



Jonathan Crookes & Son 

Sheffield, Enjland 

SUPREME CUTLERY 



ELEY BROTHERS, LTD. 

specialize in the manufacture of the following articles at 
the lowest prices : 

SHAVING STICK CASES 

OVAL AND ROUND TOPS 

for Powder Tins, Cruets, Dredgers, etc. 

METAL BOXES 

for Dentifrice, Soap Tablets, etc. 

FERRULES 

for Walking Sticks, Whips, Bamboo Fittings, etc. 

PENCIL FITTINGS 

In any of the following metals: Brass, Copper, or White- 
metal (nickel or silver plated), Aluminium and Jewellers' 
Metal (Tombac.) 

Eley Bros., Ltd. (Oept. 2 1> Edmonton, London, N. 



Consult Hardware and Metal 
Buyers' Guide 

If what you want isn't advertised in this issue, consult our Buyers' 
Directory. If it isn't listed in our Directory, write us and we will 
give you the information. 



96 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 191S 




While you hesitate 
prices soar 



There is no virtue in a waiting policy with 
the pig iron situation as it is. Better make 
sure of your BT Pumps for Fall while 
deliveries can be assured. With the 
import of pig iron absolutely cut off 
at present, prospects for a con- 
tinued supply of BT Pumps at to- 
day's prices are none too rosy. In 
fact, later on it may be impossible 
to get them at all 




What you want for Fall, 
as well as what you need 
now should be ordered 
immediately. 

The longer you delay the 
more it will cost you. 



BEATTY BROS., Limited, Fergus, Ont. 

St. John, N.B. Montreal Winnipeg Edmonton 



Brass Goods 

and 

Lawn Supplies 





Are you ready to meet this season's demand for Lawn Supplies? 
The products of the James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd., are 
famous for service and reliability wherever they are sold. 
When you make a definite claim for Morrison goods you more 
than make a sale — you have extended a service to your- cus- 
tomer that will be appreciated in repeat orders later. 
Phone or write at once for prices and particulars of Morrison 
Lawn Supplies. 

(Manufacturers of the famous Stack Gas Water Heater) 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd. 



93-97 Adelaide Street West 



Toronto 




July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



97 



CROWBARS 

No. 102-A— CHISEL POINT 

B. J. COGHLIN CO., 



We offer you bars made of High Carbon Steel at the same price a* 
you are buying the Mild Steel Bar elsewhere. Send us a trial order. 

LIMITED, Office and Factory: Ontario St. East, MONTREAL 



TARRED FELT 



SPECIFY 
DOMINION BRAND 



J. H. McCOMB, LIMITED 



Manufacturers of all kinds of 
Building Paper, Pitch and Coal Tar 



MONTREAL 




THE PROGRESSIVE MANUFACTURING CO. 

Torriogton, Conn., U.S.A. 



FORSTNER BITS 

bore their way right through tough, hard, knotty, cross-grained wood and le&T« 
a smooth hole and clean surface. That's performance. TUBY DIFFER 
FKOM ALL OTHER BITS, BEING OUIDED BY THE Rlil INSTEAU 
OF THE CEINTBR. That's scientific construction. They bore any arc of 
a circle and can be guided in any direction. That's adaptability. 
Made for Brace— made for machine. Packed singly; packed in sets. Tb&t'i 
convenience. And they sell to Wood Woriere, Carpenters, Cabinet Maken and 
others. That's why you should sell them. Only through your Jobber to-day. 




ANOTHER 
MEHASCO 
MESSAGE 



7 



Hay Carriers 

We carry a full stock of Hay Carriers, 
and in ordering from us all that is neces- 
sary is to tell us the length of the barn, 
and whether you wish to use it with slings 
or fork. The No. 500 and the Cross Draft 
are the Sling Carrier Cars, and the Nos. 
493 and 502 are Fork Carrier. We have 
a full stock of Double Harpoon, Grapple 
and Jackson Pattern Forks. 



Write us for a catalog. 

MERCHANTS HARDWARE SPECIALTIES LTD., CALGARY 





The Peterboro Lock Mfg. Company, Limited 

Peterboro, Canada 

Established 1885 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

Ship Hardware, Saddlery Hardware, Padlocks, Door Checks, Brass 
and Iron Castings, Stampings and other Hardware Specialties. 



Kindly mention this paper when writing to the advertisers. 



98 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 





Better Lamps mean Better Business 

You can easily interest your customers in Laco 
Tungsten Lamps — even while you're wrapping up the 

articles they've just bought. For every householder is open for 
better light at less cost — and the Laco Lamp is your opportunity 
to meet these requirements. When you state that 




TUNGSTEN 



flAMPS 



give a light that is 25% greater 
than the ordinary tungsten lamp 
and more than three times that of 
carbon lamps, a first sale is prac- 
tically assured. When attention is 
attracted and conviction is added 
to your sales talk — as well as effici- 
ency to your shop — by your own 
vse of Laco Lamps — it is that 
much easier. 

And once your customer has 
learned from his own actual use 



the brilliantly white light that 
Laco gives — a light that causes no 
eye-strain or fatigue and allows the 
color tones of house interiors and 
fabrics to show in their true values 
■ — and has proved for himself that 
Laco Lamps mean better, brighter, 
longer life — repeat sales are cer- 
tain, and you are building up a 
steady, profitable, prestige-earning 
business. 



Oar salesman ivill gladly show you 
the entire proposition. Write to-day. 



Canadian Laco-Philips Company Limited 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 




If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL— Electrical Section 



99 



Benjamin 

— the synonym of ideas electrical — ideas that make the use of electricity 
more practical, more economical and more convenient. 








Electrical ideas produced by Benjamin 
have materially helped to popularize 
the use of Electricity in the home, the 
factory, the office — helped to make it 
"a better servant," and the growing 
use of electricity has made Benjamin 
electrical devices popular. 
These are some of the Benjamin pro- 
ducts : 

Wireless Clusters 

Plug Clusters 

Attachment Plugs 

Stand Lamp Clusters 

Sockets 

Wiring Devices 

Reflectors 

Street Lighting Units 

Store and Office Fixtures 

Industrial Lighting Units 

Gas and Vapor Proof Fixtures 

Show Case Lighting Material 

Knife Switches 

Panel Boards 

Marine Fixtures 





Benjamin Electric Mfg. Co. of Canada, Ltd. 

M/VK.ERS OF- • 

Benjamin 

F3RODUCXS OF CANI/>>D/\ 



Main Office and Factory 



11-17 Charlotte Street 



Toronto, Canada 



100 



HARDWARE AND METAL— Electrical Section 



July 6, 1918 






.. i'^.^ 



"jiM 



^^M 



'luiM 





m^ 



'^Northern Electric 
HOUSEHOLD UTENSILS 

It is a known fact that electricity has done more than anything else towards 

the establishment of efficiency plus economy in the home. 

Here are a few of our Electric Household Heating Appliances which are 

always in demand. We urge Dealers to stock a moderate supply of these 

high-grade lines, because our Consumer Announcements in the Daily Papers 

from coast to coast will, in part, feature these Northern Electric Household 

Appliances. 







July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



101 




THE POWER COSTS NOTHING 



One of the best sell- 
ing washing Mach- 
ines, where water 
pressure is available, 
is the "Idear' Water 
Power Washer. 

The fact that the power is 
suppHed from the water tap 
and costs nothing, appeals 
very strongly to many thrifty 
buyers. 



Everything about the "Ideal" is strong and well built. The 
parts are interchangeable, and those that come into contact 
with water are made of the best quality brass. It runs on 
low pressure from the regular half-inch house service pipes. 
There is good business to be done with the "Ideal." 

Dowswell, Lees & Co., Ltd. 

HAMILTON, CANADA 




Eastern Representative : 
JOHN R. ANDERSON, MONTREAL 



Western Representative : 
HARRY F. MOULDEN & SON, WINNIPEG 



102 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 





The "19M" Cataract Electric Washer 



The Washers the Women Want 

The articles that are in demand are the profitable ones, from the Hardware Man's 
standpoint. Those that are hard to sell — the unknown ones — prove less lucrative, in 
the long run. 

It's Profits That You Want 

and you can get them from "1900" Washers. 

For more than twenty years we have been making and selling nothing but washing 
machines — the very best that can be made. Our whole attention has been centred on 
"1900" Washers, on perfecting and developing new models. 



With the addition of our two newest and greatest 
models, the "1900" line is complete. 



The "1900" Cataract 
Electric Washer 

These most modern wa.shers, as well as the other 
"1930" machines— the Gravity, Water Power and 
Gasoline Motor Washers— are sold everywhere through 
our extensive advertising, which is the largest pub- 
licity campaign eondnd'e*:! for washing machines in 
Canada. Inqniries in large numbei-s result from 



The "1900" Agitator 
Electric Washer 

this advertising, and these inqniries are turned over 
to such "190O" dealers as have proven their worth 
in their different territories. 

If there is no one selling "1930" Washers in your 
teivitoi'y there is a chance for you. Make use of it 
by writing to-d'ay to the Wholesale Department 



THE "1900" WASHER COMPANY 

257 Yonge Street - - Toronto 





No. 450 
3 Speed, 10 Inch, Oscillating 



These Two Fans are 

Pulling Sales for 

Your Competitor 

Right Now— 




Prominently display a few 
of these two popular styles 
of Northwind Fans« Hot 

weather is here and they'll sell quicker than you expect. 

Your competitor is doing it. Order from 

FACTORY PRODUCTS LIMITED 

220 King Street West, TORONTO 



No. 44 
2 Speed, 8 Inch 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



10- 




If you didn't get a copy of the new 




Catalogue 



write us and we will gladly mail you one 

Our complete line is shown and there is 
a lot of interesting information in it. 

THE NATIONAL ELECTRIC HEATING CO., LIMITED 

Toronto, Canada 



Your Wants 

are many here below. 

Use HARDWARE 

& MET AL want ad. 

page and get rid of a 

few of them. 





ELECTRIC 




WASHERS 




IRONERS 




CLEANERS 


— the prestige-building, profit-paying 


line of home labor-saving devices. Sell 


because they - -^ - ■ 


excel. 


NOW is the time 


JEM^^^^^ 


to get the business 


^MalSS 1^^^^^^^^^^ 


they offer — write 


^^K^^^aht ^^^^^^^^^^^ 


for catalog and 


^^^Htt^^^ |b^.AII^^^^^^^^^ 


our selling plan. 


^Ht^T^^^^^^^ 


HURLEY 


^■""^^^^^B 


MACHINE 


^■H^^^n^v 


CO., LIMITED 


^^^■Vilpl^^S imlliK t^^^Ki^^^W 


413 Yonge Street 


tHFi ^i^^^^SiF 


TORONTO 





104 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 




Sillil^i!^^ 




Any trade "1 1 1 ark shonn on this page, when stamped on 
an article of hardware, is the manufacturer's personal S 
"O.K.," guaranteeing the quality of the product. '" 






wimtm 




STEEL STAMPS 

Drop > card for pricai and particular*. 

HAMILTON STAMP & STENCIL WORKS. LTD. 
HAMILTON. ONT. 




AUENnSODERING FLUX 

Safest and strongest, Stick, Paste, 
Liquid or Salts. Samples free. 

BISSETT & WEBB, LIMITED 

126 Lombard St.. Winnipeg, Can. 




FOOD CHOPPERS 

SniTM and pUt«a made from 
wroosht Swedish steel of finest 
qualit;. These Choppers may be 
had tinned all orer or enamelled 
white inside and japanned red 
outside. Stocli carried. 

r. W. LAMPLOUGH * CO. 
Unity Bldjr.. Mamtml 




ThePARMS^TER BULLOCH CO., Ltd 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and CojnwT Bireta, Iron and Copper Burn, 
Bifurcated and Tabular Bireta. Wire Nails, 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails, Bscut- 
eheon Pins. iLeather Shoe and Orerahoe Buckles, 
Felloe Plate*. 



Maple Uaf'Brand 

coTT5soj(>. BELTING 

Maple Leaf" Brand 
Beit nrcssma 

DOMINION BtLlING CO.lTj. 



STERLING 
Hack Saw Blades and Machine< 

Manufactured by 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works 

BUFFALO. N.Y. 




AMILTON OnT 



BATH ROOM FITTINGS 



51 + '.^r&a, — £iP 



JR, BRUCE 

____ @«ITED 

I ^^-iWlUt WiUAiCe WB CUARMiTEB 

■ l f ll Ifll llll ,^^,„„,^,,,^,^ 



AUTO ACCESSORIES 



THE CLIPPER 

There are three thlnfi 
that destroy your lawn: 
Dandelions, Buck Plan- 
tain and Crab Qrass. In 
one season the 'dipiper 
will drive them ^ oat. 
All dealers should In- 
restigate selling poni- 
biliities. Drop us a line 
and we will send cir- 
cular and prices. 

CLIPPER LAWN MOWER CO. Dixon, 111. 



Poultry Leg Bandsf , 
Ear lags and Butt onsi 

FOR STOCK Rdail Pricti 

Challenge adjustable Leg Bands 15c per doz. 85c per 100 

Single spiral colored bands ^ 20c per doz, 90c per 100 

Three spiral colored bands 25c per doz. $1.25 per 100 

Cattle Ear Tags and Buttons, prices according to amount 

of printing required. Catalogue Frw ~ 

RiDEAU Specialty Co. 

NA«uFkcn/nERs Smiths falu ok 




8l|h.E.R0S^' 




Your Ad In This Paper 

will get the attention of the busy 
men. They find here what they 
want, and they use it as a catalogue 
when they are in need. Will they 
see your ad? 



KINDLY MENTION THLS 

PAPER WHEN WRITING 

ADVERTISERS 



^^aTdIAMPBIACKS 

^ r/?df gets /)/^ b/zs/Wcss 
,>to^?^^-.5s* WIICKLS.MARTIN WILCKESCO 




M\t> 



STOVE & ELECTRICAL 

MICA 

Stove mica in assorted 
sizes for the trade 

A. G. MARTIN 

234-236 Besserer St. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 



For Quick Sales 

Recently a hardware deal- 
er in Western Canada be- 
came overstocked with 
shotguns. He placed a 
want ad. in Hardware & 
Metal. We learned even- 
tually that he not only dis- 
posed of his stock, but re- 
ceived several orders that 
he could not fill. If this 
man had kept this stock 
away, it would not only 
have deteriorated in value, 
but he would have had to 
pay taxes, insurance, etc. 
on it. If you have any- 
thing on hand which you 
wish to dispose of quick- 
ly advertise it in our want 
column. The quick results 
will make the first cost 
negligible. 



July 6, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



105 




HELP WANTED 



\17ANTED — A HARDWARE CLERK, ONE 
with seven or eight years' experience pre- 
ferred. Apply stating experience and salary 
expected. Box 306, Hardware and Metal. 



FOR SALE 



TTARDWARE STOCK AND BUSINESS FOR 
"- sale in live town of 800. First-clasa fanners' 
trade. Hydro just coming in. Apply Box 869. 
Hardware and Metal. 

TTARDWAHE BUSINESS FOR SALE. STOCK 
" ahout $2.'i.000 ; rieht on the main street : 
huildinps 2,5 x 120. two-story; owner retiring. 
Apply P.O. Box 27.";, Sudhury. Ont. 



AGENCIES WANTED 

"-pO REPLACE FOREIGN AGENCIES WHICH 
"-e hflve to droo on account of the war we are 
onen for nrn'iosition from Canadian manufactur- 
ers of machinery, hardware and saddlery special- 
ties with the view of actinn as selling agents in 
the Province uf Quebec. Eight years' experience. 
Str-ctly first-class references can be furnished and 
cosh guarantee if necessary. Correspondence in- 
vited. International Agency, 416 St. Nicholas 
B'dg.. Montreal. 

T COVER QUEBEC PROVINCE. TWENTY 
vears' experience in hardware, paint and var- 
nish, sixteen years on the road. Both languages. 
Bank references furnished. Box .509, Hardware 
and Metal. 128 Dleury St.. Montreal. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

rAREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING 
8y8tems. Tay lor-Fok be» Company, Ltd. Sup- 
olied by the trade throughout Canada (tfl 



Wi 



/^lOOD STENOGRAPHERS ARE WHAT EVEB\ 
^ employer wants. The place to get good 
•tenographers is at the Remington Employment 
Department. No charge for the service. Reming- 
ton Typewriter Co.. Ltd., 144 Bay St.. Toronto 

r\OUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE— BY IN- 
stalling an Otis-Fensom hand-power elevator 
you can use upper floors as stock room or extra 
selling space, and increase space on ground floor 
Costs only $70. Write for catalogue "B," Oti»- 

Kensom Elevator Co., Toronto. 

pIFTY DOLLARS TIED UP m OLD Fix- 
tures that you are no longer using would 
make a lot of money for you if invested in stock 
and turned over three or four times a year. Get 
your money out, by selling the fixtures to one 
of Hardware and Metal's readers who may be 
looking for exactly what you have to offer. 



A DOING TYPEWRITER WRITE, ADD OB 
subtract in one operation. Elliott Fisher. 
Limited, Room 314 Stair Building, Toronto. 

rpHE SUREST WAY FOR THE MANTJFAC- 
-*• turers' agent to connect with good live flrma 
is to tell the manufacturers who read Hardware 
and Metal, all about his ability to sell their 
goods. Try an advertisement on the Condensed 
Ad. Page of Hardware and Metal, under thi« 
heading. ° 



This page is the logical place 
for anyone in the Canadian 
hardware trade to place his 
"condensed" advertisements if 
he wants anj'thing that can be 
supplied by any other Canadian 
hardwareman. 



Do you want a clerk or store 
manager? 

Do you want a position as 
clerk or travelling sales- 
man? 

Do you want a traveller? 

Do you want to sell or ex- 
change your business? 

Do you want to buy a hard- 
ware business? 

Do you want to buy or sell 
any store equipment? 

If so, sit down now, and draft an 
advertisement for Hardware and 
Metal's "Wanted" page, setting 
forth just what you want, and 
stating your needs or qualifications. 

Such an advertisement will auto- 
matically seek out for you, the only 
people you want to reach — those 
who are actively engaged in sell- 
ing hardware, in Canada. 

The cost? 

Trifling! Two cents per word for 
first insertion and' one cent per 
word for each subsequent insertion 
of the same advertisement. Each 
figure is counted as a word, and a 
charge of 5 cents extra per inser- 
tion is made when Box Number is 
required. In this way the adver- 
tiser's name is kept confidential. 

Copy for Condensed Advertise- 
ments should reach the Toronto 
office of Hardware and Metal not 
later than Thursday morning to 
catch the current week's issue. In 
order to save unnecessary corres- 
pondence and bookkeeping, please 
remit with copy, preferably by 
money order. 



Getting Results 

A large firm in a Western 
Canada city recently advertised 
in Hardware and Metal Want 
Ad. Page for a man to fill a re- 
sponsible position — result 21 re- 
plies. This indicates that the 
want ad. page is followed close- 
ly. The man YOU want to 
reach is reading this page. 



Twelve Cents 
Per Word! 



Several weeks ago a firm in 
Vancouver, B.C., telegraphed a 
want ad to Hardware and Metal. 
They wanted a clerk in a hurry 
and wished to catch the earliest 
issue. 

The cost of a telegram from 
Vancouver to Toronto is ten 
cents per word, added to this 
was our charge of two cents per 
word. 

This firm had faith enough in 
Hardware and Metal's Want Ad 
column to pay twelve cents per 
word, for an announcement in 
this column. This little story 
speaks for itself. Mail or wire 
your want ads, we will accept 
them until Thursday noon for 
the current issue. 

Hardware and Metal 
Want Ad Dept. 



106 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 6, 1918 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Occasionally advertisements are inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the 

advertiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is 

inserted solely for the convenience of the readers of the paper. 



Acme Waste Mfg. Co., Ltd 94 

Allen, J. B., & Co 104 

American Grinder Mfg. Co. . . 30 

American Shearer Co 1 

Baines & Peckover 14 

Banwell-Hoxie Wire Fence Co. . 94 

Barnett, G. & H., Co T5 

Beatty Bros 26 

Beauchamp, J. E., & Co 94 

Benjamin Electric Co 99 

Beatty Bros »* 

Best Weather Strip Co., Ltd... 94 

Birkett, Thos.. Co 30 

Boeckh Co., Ltd., The 61 

Bradstreets 65 

Brandram-Henderson, Ltd 63 

Brantford Roofing Co., Ltd. ... 29 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Co., The 31 

Brown-Boggs Co.. Ltd 22 

Cameron & Campbell 93 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co 33 

Canada Glue Co 9.=; 

Canada Linseed Oil Co 67 

Canada Metal Co 67 

Canada Steel Goods Co 6 

Canadian Blower & Forge Co.. 22 

Can. Consolidated Rubber Co... 34 
Can. Foundries & Forgings Co., 

Ltd 21 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., 

Ltd 22-27 

Canadian Laco-Phillins Co., Ltd. 98 

Can. Pneumatic Tool Co 24 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co. . . . 

Inside front cover 

Canadian Warren Axe Co 12 

Canadian Yale & Towne. Ltd. . . 1 

Carriage Factories, Limited . . 2.5 

Caverhill. Learmont & Co 89 

Carborundum Co., The 26 

Channed Chemical Co 36 

Climax Baler Co 104 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co 104 



Coghlin, B. J., Co., Ltd 95 

Col'ette Mfg. Co 85 

Collins Mfg. Co 31 

Crookes, Jonathan, & Son ... 95 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Ltd. 6 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Wks. 104 

Dominion Belting Co 104 

Dominion Cartridge Co 17 

Dominion Sheet Metal Co., Ltd., 

Inside back cover 

Dougall Varnish Co.. Ltd., The 83 

Dowswell, Lees & Co 101 

Eley Bros., Ltd 95 

Empire Mfg. Co 73 

Factory Products, Ltd 102 

Geneva Cutlery Co 4 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd.. . . 79 

Greenfield Tap & Die Co 11 

Gregg Mfg. Co 79 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Co 

Inside back cover 

Hamilton Carhartt Cotton Mills, 

Ltd 33 

Hamilton Cotton Co 33 

Hamilton Stamp & Stencil 

Works, Ltd 104 

Hendryx, The Andrew B., Co. 

Inside back cover 

Hoyt Metal Co 24 

Hurley Machine Co 103 

Hutton, Jas., & Co 95 

Hygienic Products, Ltd .^0 

Hyslop Bros 29 

Imperial Varnish & Color Co. . 75 

Jamieson & Co., R. C 71 

Jardine, A. B., & Co 32 

Jennings, Russell Mfg. Co. ... 94 

Kinzinger, Bruce & Co., Ltd. . . 104 

Kloepfer, C 95 



Laidlaw Bale & Tie Co 30 

Lamplough, F. W., Co 104 

Landers, Frary & Clark 2 

Leslie, A. C, & Co., Ltd 36 

Lewis Bros., Ltd 3 

London Rolling Mills Co 93 

Lufkin Rule Co... Inside back cover 

Martin, A. G 104 

Martin, The L., Co 95 

McArthur, Alex., & Co 85 

McComb, J. H.. Ltd 95 

McDougall, R., Co., Ltd 32 

McKinnon Industries, Ltd 

Back cover 
Merchants Hardware Specialties, 

Ltd 97 

Meakins & Sons 81 

Michelin Tire Co. of Can., Ltd. 15 

Metallic Roofing Co lii 

Moore, Benjamin, & Co., Ltd. 61 

Morrison, James, Brass Co 96 

Myers, F. E., & Bros 134 

Nagle, H., Mfg. Co 65 

National Cash Register Co. ... 19 
National Electric Heating Co., 

Ltd 103 

National Hardware Co 104 

National Mfg. Co 5 

Nicholson File Co 12 

North Bros 8 

North American Hardware Co. 83 
Northern Bolt, Screw & Wire 

Co., Ltd 87 

Northern Electric Co 100 

Nova Scotia Steel Co 65 

Oakey, John & Sons 93 

Otterville Mfg. Co 93 

Owl Metal Co., Ltd 93 

Parmenter, Bulloch & Co 104 

Pedlar People, Ltd., The 27 

Penn Inc., A. C Front cover 

Peterboro Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd.. 97 

Pink, Thos., & Co 85 



Plewes, Ltd 83 

Plymouth Cordage Co 7 

Progressive Mfg. Co 97 

Port Hope File Mfg. Co 87 

Powerlight Co., The 14 

Prairie City Oil Co 87 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Ltd 1 

Ramsay, A., & Son 69 

Reed, Geo. W., & Co., Ltd. ... 81 

Renfrew Machinery Co., Ltd. . . 32 

Rideau Specialty Co 104 

Royal Iron Mfg. Co 27 

Scythes & Co., Ltd 31 

Shaler, C. A., Co 16 

Sharratt & Nevrth 93 

Shipman, Harold C, & Co 104 

Standard Paint Co »5 

Stanley Rule & Level Co 10 

Starret. L. S., Co 23 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 3 

Stephens, G. F., Co 77 

Still Mfg. Co., J. H 91 

Stover Mfg. & Engine Co 9! 

Stratford Brass Co 106 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co 91 

Taylor-Forbes, Ltd 13 

Thompson, B. & S., Co., Ltd. . . 32 
Toronto Plate Glass Importing 

Co 75 

Trimont Mfg. Co 8 

United Brass Founders 18 

Volpeek Mfg. Co 65 

Wheeler & Bain 93 

Wilckcs-Martin-Wilckes Co. ... 104 

Wilkinson & Kompass 94 

Williams, J. H., & Co 31 

Woods. Walter, & Co ' . . . 20 

Wrought Washer Co 20 

1900 Washer Co 102 



STORE MANAGEMENT— COMPLETE 

16 Fnii-Pai. ANOTHER NEW BOOK 

Illustrations g^ FRANK FARRINGTON 

A Companion book to RetaO AdvertuiDg Couplctt 

$1.00 POSTPAID 

*'Store Management— Complete** tells all about the 
maoasement o( a atore so that not only the greatest aalea 
but the largest profit may be realized. 

THIRTEEN CHAPTERS 

Here is a sample; 
CHAPTER v.— The Store Policy— What It shonid be 
to hold trade. The moneybAck plan. Taking back goods. 
Meeting cut rates. Selling remnants. Delivering goods. 
Substitution. Handling telephone calls. Rebalinf railroad 
(are. Courtesy to customers. 

ABSOLUTELY NEW JUST PUBUSHED 

Send us $1.00. Keep the book ten dayt and ( it iao'l 
worth the price return it and Bet your nM>ney t^ck. 

Technical Book Dept., HacLean Pablishin^ Co. 
TORONTO 




' 272 PaA»a 
Bonmd in Cloth 




You Will Profit 
by These New Ideas 

In our new catalogue you will find 
reproductions of designs of the dif- 
ferent styles and patterns, includ- 
ing the very latest ideas in trim- 
mings for Period Furniture as well 
as other kinds. 

Sash Locks, Sash Lifts, Casement 
Fasteners, Door Pulls, Hat Hooks, 
Transom Catches, Key Plates, 
Flush Bolts, Sash 
Push and Pull Plates, 
House Numbers, Door 
Knockers, Casement 
Adjusters, etc. 



The Stratford Brass 
Company, Limited 

Stratford, Ontario 



Wi 



X 



HARDWARE AND M E T A 1. 




Parrot Cages 

The cage that satisfies both the consumer and dealer 
at once. The former demands quality, the latter — • 
profits. 

The cups are of tinned iron, non-rusting and inde- 
structible. 

Order a stock for May and June — the parrot season. 

THE ANDREW B. HENDRYX CO. 

New Haven, Conn. 



"Multiped" 

The Garden Hose That Doesn't Kink 





A MOULDED, CORRUGATED HOSE OF EXTRAORDINARY 
STRENGTH, MADE IN LENGTHS OF ABOUT 500 FEET. 



GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER, LIMITED 

Toronto, Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Fort William, Winnipeg:, Regrina, Saskatoon, Lethbridpe, Calg:ary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Victoria 



MANUFACTURED 
SOLELY BY 






/UFKJN GOODS 



BOXWOOD RULES SPRING JOINT WOOD RULES 

MEASURING TAPES 

On these lines 

TH E /i/FKJN Rule t?a. ofQanada^Itj). 

W/NDSOR.ONT, 



can give you the very best of service and satisfaction. 
ARE WIDELY KNOWN AND HAVE THE HIGHEST REPUTATION FOR 

ACCURACY AND FAULTLESS SERVICE 

STOCKED BY JOBBERS. SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 





DREADNAUGHT 



Steel Hames 



Doubletrees 



Designed and built on scientific principles. The two 
pieces of selected steel forming the body of Dread- 
naught Hames reinforce each other, as do the steel 
rod and wood of Dreadnaught Doubletrees. They 
form a perfect Truss — the strongest possible con- 
struction. They are mechanically correct. For the 
heavy pulls and terrific strains of rough spring work 
they have no equal. 

HELP THE FARMERS PLOW DEEP 

We need big crops. Equip your farmers with 
Dreadnaught Hames and Doubletrees so they can 
do their bit. Write to-day for prices and descrip- 
tion of these dependable, profit-making lines. 

McKinnon Industries, Ltd. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO 



No. 8382 

Two Piece 
Double 
Strength 




No. 8382 

Anti-Rust 

Treated 

Durable 



J 



Vol. XXX PUBLISHED EVERY SATUR D AY S INC E 1888 July 13 

^^ ^^ THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED ^^^^ 

PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 




1864—1918 



FIFTY-FOUR YEARS RECOGNIZED 

THE 

STANDARD 
"The Kind Your Grandfather Used" 

Mi\()stonBrai\d 



Best in Quality — Most Reliable 

GUARANTEED ALWAYS 

THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN THE BEST 



GET WHAT YOU WANT 



THE 



Dominion Linseed Oil Co., 

LIMITED 

TORONTO 



BADEN 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



UNIVERSAL 



Ay a I [^ii ^HB rn-;;-,:^7| 




The 
Bottle 
With 
the Big 
Drink- 
ing Cup 



.^■:,_:^'P 



VACUUM BOTTLES 




Absolutely sanitary, no felt pads, cork rings, or cement fastenings. 
UNIVERSAL shock absorber reduces breakage to a minimum. 

UNIVERSAL Vacuum Bottle With Extra Cups 

This is a patented UNIVERSAL feature, and while there are other vacuum bottles 
with extra cups, a glance at the UNIVERSAL method of construction will show its 
superiority. Whenever you sell a Vacuum Bottle, show the nested cup feature and 
you've added another selling point to your story. 

LANDERS, FRARY & CLARK, New Britain, Conn. 

Canadian Representatives: 

A. MACFARLANE & CO., MONTREAL 



// any advertisement interests yoti, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Facts which are easily proven 



LEWISITE 

AND 
COVERTITE 



THE 
VERY 
BEST 

Roofing 



Supplied in 

I, 2 and 3 PLY 

with cement 

and nails. 

Write us for particulars. 

The quality of above well known 
Brands is proven by the increased 
demand from year to year. 

fVE HAVE A BETTER PROPOSITION THAN ANY 
CANADIAN MANUFACTURER OR JOBBER. 
WRITE FOR IT. 

LEWIS BROS., LIMITED, MONTREAL 





HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



Priest's Toilet 
Clippers 

You will make no mistake in 
getting acquainted with Priest's 
Toilet Clippers because you can 
depend upon them to satisfy 
your customers. 



A. MacFarlane & Co. 
Montreal, Canada 

Selling Agents 



Wiebusch & Hilger, Ltd. 
New York City 






Again in Demand 

The wooden tub is back — the high cost of the 
metal tub is largely responsible, but a wood- 
en tub has other advantages. 

There is no galvanizing or plating to fall 
off. No rust to spoil clothes, and hot water 
retains its heat longer. 

Cane's wash tubs will be favored. They last 
a lifetime and are built with the workman- 
ship that has made Cane's Woodenware 
popular for over thirty-five years. 
Order a supply of Cane's Tubs from your 
dealer for a Source of Good Revenue. 

The Wm. Cane & Sons Company, Ltd. 

Manufacturers NEWMARKET, ONTARIO 



If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Side View 
of "Big 4" 





Showing Flexible Feature 
of "Big 4" 



Front View of 
"Big 4" hanger 



There's but one best 

Barn Door Hanger- 



The "Big 4" Barn Door Hanger is simply but heavily built 
entirely of steel; has no complicated parts to get out of order; 
runs smoothly on anti-friction steel roller bearings; is flexible; 
is fastened to but one side of th e door; brings the door close to 
the track; has sherardized axles and rivets; wheel housing is 
efifectually prevented from binding on hub of wheel; japan- 
ning is done before assembling, ensuring bearings free from 
japan; cannot jump the track. 
These are the features that have made "Big 4" the great seller it is. 

Packed the careful "National Way" — one pair in a box with bolts for at- 
taching; a printed tag is also packed in each box, giving a list of articles 
required to properly equip each door. This serves as a reminder to the 
clerk and will help make sales of articles listed. 

Have you a " N ational" catalog? ^ ^ 

NATIONAL MANUFUCTURING CO., Sterling, Illinois 



.-?*. 



.^'^^ 



g^if&.,. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



THE ROLLSTON IS THE EASIEST AND MOST ACCURATE 
WORKING CLOTHES LINE PULLEY MADE 



The Wheel is large, 
which permits easy 
running. 

The Guides adapt 
themselves to all con- 
ditions and prevent 
line getting out of the 
groove in wheel. 




The Frame is made of 
heavy gauge steel — 
never binds, and per- 
mits free action. 

Its entire construction 
allows the line to 
work easily and give 
years of service and 
satisfaction. 



Its an exceptionally good selling; article that shows quick, big, profitable cash returns. 

Manufactured by 

CANADA STEEL GOODS COMPANY, LIMITED 

HAMILTON, CANADA 




Davidson s Well Known 

FROST RIVER 

Refrigerator shown herewith 

Maae entirely of Sheet Steel Galoanized 

The exterior is Japanned French Grey, beautifully finished with 
neatly decorated panels and comer scrolls. 

The Food Chamber is coated with white enamel, thoroughly hard- 
ened and baked on in an oven of high temperature. 

All inside parts are removable for cleaning purposes. 

The drip pipe for the waste water has been carried outside the 
body, and does not run through the Food Chamber — as usual in other 
refrigerators. 

Made in three sizes, the largest with double doors. 

NOW is the time to get your Orders in 

for these goods and ensure 

prompt shipment. 

The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. 

LIMITED 
Toronto Montreal Winnipeg- 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAF. 




For Your Protection 



This trade-mark is our promise to you, personally, 
that all the goods on which it is placed are fully 
guaranteed in the fairest and broadest measure. 

You can make no mistake in giving them the 
highest recommendation. 



j^^ H. S. ROWLAND, SONS & CO. j^^ 



;■ HOt»LAHDS-,, 

v;samsonJ| 

^^ QUALITY i 



LIMITED 



WHOLESALE HARDWARE 
TORONTO 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



fe.!j§;!Sg^-isg;v^g^iiJS^.?'Xi^-i^h^»^>r^K^;M-JJ^^ 



f 



>A;:g^a;j;a?V:sayria.i:;ya^-?i%;^.^^j>?jy^ 



9. 



¥■ 



M 




D 



THE DUST-FREE STORE 

UST can never be kept out of the store, but it can be 
effectively controlled by the use of 




which when appHed to your floors, definitely lays and holds 90% of atmos- 
pheric dust. This is a condition of affairs that the old fashioned mop and 
feather duster can never bring about. They only disturb the dust to 
settle elsewhere. 

Standard Floor Dressing is economical. A single gallon suffices for 500-700 
square feet of space or shelving, and lasts for several months. It may be 
applied with an ordinary floor sprayer. To keep the dressed surfaces in 
order, all that is necessary is to sweep off the accumulated dust and dirt 
regularly with a stiff brush or broom. 

Floors treated with Standard Floor Dressing help to promote a fresher, 
tidier store, and cleaner, quicker-selling stock on the shelves. 

Supplied in one and four gallon cans, and in barrels and half barrels. 



•^7 



IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED 

BRANCHES IN ALL CITIES 



If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




On the Streets 



At the Front 



IN EVERY PART OF THE WORLD 



BELL 




BRAND 



BRAND 



HORSE SHOES 

ARE IN CONSTANT USE 
AND GIVING SATISFACTION 



THE 



STEEL COMPANY 

OF 

CANADA 



HAMILTON 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



If any udwiiiKtmciit intocsls you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 







"ZIG-ZAG" RULES 



The term "ZIG-ZAG" as applied to fold- 
ing rules made of flexible wood is a trade- 
mark belonging to this Company. 

They are made with two distinct types 
of joints, the Concealed Joint in which 
there is no hole through the wood, and the 
Rivet Joint in which the rivet is carried 
through both wood and joint. Both types 



contain a stiff spring which holds the rule 
rigid when open, even in the longest 
lengths. 

Several other patented features add spe- 
cial value to the Stanley and Victor rules. 

Made in all standard lengths and fin- 
ishes. A few leading numbers shown above. 

MANUFACTURED BY 



Stanley Rule & Level Co 

New Britain. Conn. U.S.A. 



The things your customers 
will find out — 

The things your customer will find out — is bent upon 
finding out — before she makes a purchase — are the 
things that take up so much of your time in making 
a sale. In selling Daisy Churns the selling points are 
very few but remarkably effective. 

The construction is so simple — the general efficiency 
^0 immediately apparent to the prospective pur- 
chaser, that time is never wasted in tediously ex- 
plaining and repeating. 

The facts are few and strong and sales are always made with a snap that 
s :":'ses the dealer. 

Just ask another Daisy dealer if this is not a fact. If he is one of our 

live dealers he may even go further and tell you that he can sell more 

Daisys than' any other make, and will often do no more than merely 

show the machine to the customer. 

Try it yourself. Sales and profits are bound to follow your 

experiment. 

Just drop a line of enquiry to 

BEATTY BROS. LTD., FERGUS, ONT. 





St. John, N.B. 



Montreal 



Winnipeg 



Edmonton 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



DRILL CH)U,CKS 

Goodell-Pratt Drill Chucks are made with 
shanks suitable for every kind of drill and bit 
brace. The capacities range from to % inch, 
and the prices from $1.20 to $7.00. 

These Drill Chucks are quality tools. They are 
made entirely of steel, and their high-grade con- 
struction stands comparison with the more ex- 
pensive kinds. Equal accuracy and durability are 
usually found only in tools of much greater cost. 

Chucks can be furnished with i/2-inch shanks, 
41/64 inch shanks, bit brace shanks, ratchet 
shanks, No. 1 and No. 2 Morse taper shanks, cross 
handles, and some with taper holes. 

If you are looking for a chuck of moderate 
price, but with the strength necessary to meet 
all of your requirements, you can do no better 
than to get one of these tools. 

I Goodell-Pratt Company 

e^gw^ Greenfield, Mass. 






m 



^Makers JB 

Mr.Rwnch 



.■2 1 < 



i».r*-3ap.'Vw i 






If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to he answered. 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



Standardize 
Your File Trade 

Amongst the "Famous Five" there 
is a file to meet the exact needs of 
every customer. 

Your customer will accept a 
"Famous Five" file every time 
without question,' because he 
knows that "Famous Five" are the 
standard for file quality. 

Your "line of least resistance" in 
selling is to specify the "Famous 
Five" when buying. 

They are : 





WHY NOT BE GUIDED 
BY THE JUDGMENT OF 
HUNDREDS OF WELL 
KNOWN LUMBERMEN. 
WHO ACKNOWLEDGE 
THE SUPERIORITY OF 

"SAGER AXES" 

AND 

"SOO LINE" 
LOGGING 

TOOLS? 

GET THE HABIT. 

(AND THE PROFIT) 

Canadian Warren 
Axe & Tool Co. 

LIMITED 
ST. CATHARINES. ONT. 





Soo Line 
Logging Tools 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAJ. 



13 



'aua/z^yJPi^ 



SHI N dLE sf isim tie lie e i li h c coji r u c at e d i r 6 n tr o uc h P o fjtif etc^;^ I 



"Metallic dealer service" — it's effective 



32 years successful experi- 
ence of how to sell "Met- 
allic" Ceiling and Wall 
plates is a selling force 
that's bound to get you many 
profitable jobs in your neigh- 
borhood. Just a little bit of 
co-operation is all we ask. 

Get our illustrated catalogue 
and full particulars. 

Stock carried by 

GEO. W. REED & CO., LTD. 

37 St. Aotoine Street Montreal 




fneMitallHfflBi^H 






The 

SAW or TOOL 

tinth "BISSTON" on it 

is Guaranteed 
SUPERIOR in QUALITY and FINISH 

to any saib or tool 

without "DISSTON" on it. 

"If you want a Saw or Tool it is best to get one 
with a name on it which has a reputation. A man 
who has made a reputation for his goods knows its 
value, as well as its cost, and voill maintain it." 






1840 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC. 

KEYSTONE SAW, TOOL STEEL AND FILE WORKS 

TORONTO, - CANADA 



PHILADELPHIA, U.S. A 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



OFFICIAL 

AWAR D 
RIBBON 



TRIMO TOOLS 





TRIMO PIPB WBENCH 
WOOD HANDLB 



PANAMA PACIFIC 

INTERNATIONAL 

EXPOSITION 

SAN FRANCISCO 

1915 



PRESlOEHTOf THE SUPtmOR JURY 

DIHECTOB OF EXHIBITS 



EViEDAL 

DEPARTMEMTOF 

MANUFACTURESAND 
VARIED INDUSTRIES 




Nut with Nut Guards 

BE sure to ask for the 
Trimo Wrenches, 
both Pipe and Monkey. 
They are equipped with 
Nut Guards that pre- 
vent the accidental turn- 
ing of the adjusting nut 
in close quarters, and 
with Steel Frames in the 
principal size that will 
not break. 

SEND FOR CATALOG 
NO. 55. 

T RI MO NT 
MFG. CO. 

55-71 Amory Street 
Roxbury, Mass. 
U.S.A. 




WITH F1.AT-L.INK OR CABLE CUAIM 



ATKINS 

Sterling Quality Cross-Cut Saws 




The Saw that brings a higher price — a bigger profit. Their Service makes 
them worth it. 

Sterling quality steel backed by sixty years' experience has produced these 
popular Saws. Get quotations and resale prices immediately. Ask for catalog 

Made in Canada. 

E. C. ATKINS & CO. 

Makers of Sterling Saws 
Factory— Hamilton Ont. Vancouver Branch— 109 Powell St. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place win 



io be c.nr::nrd. 



16 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 





A size and 

style for 

every car 



Spark Plugs, 

Rugged— Durable — Cleanable 

Explosion after explosion inside the cylinder wall hammers 
away at the spark plug like the kick-back of a rapid-fire 
gun. 

Red hot sparks brust in showers from the electrode. 
Sterling Spark Plugs are built rugged to withstand these 
forces, and durable to give long-time service. 
Sterling Plugs are separable, so that when carbon accumu- 
lates they may be made new again by the simple process of 
wiping mth a cloth or waste. 

If your motor is not equipped with separable plugs you will 
replace them. Then put in Sterlings and note the smooth- 
ness and even torque of your motor. 

Dealers who put Sterlings in stock render customers a ser- 
vice and benefit by the resulting good will. 
For sale by progressive garages and supply dealers. 

Distributors for Canada: 

THE DOMINION BATTERY COMPANY, LIMITED 

736 Dundas Street East, Toronto 

Manufactured By 

LOCKWOOD-ASH MOTOR CO. 1 

•• Main St., Jackson, Mich., U.S.A. 

■ (33) 



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July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 




lym 



TRADE MARK 



Ganadian Okxiucts 




SPEED UP SEARCHLIGHT SALES WITH 
THESE QUICK SELLERS 

Here are the most sensational sellers in the searchlight line — Colored 
Enameled Metal Tubular Searchlights. 

You won't keep a stock of these long. Mechanics, autoists, farmers, 
business men, housewives, boys and girls will swarm to take them off 
your hands. They're just what you've been looking for — something 
to add spice and put new life into searchlight sales. 

Made in standard tubular sizes. Four colors: Red, Green, Brown and 
Blue. Colors guaranteed. 

Write for samples and prices. Get these sales-liveners into your stock 
as quickly as possible. Display them, sell them ; get an idea of the 
profit there is in handling RELIABLE Canadian Products. 

THE DOMINION BATTERY COMPANY 

LIMITED 

W. M. Turnley, Manager 
736 Dundas Street East 






^^ Lively and Lasting 



HI Ri) WARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



I I 



TORONTO 



I ..,. f 



JULY 13, 1918 



i i^'^ ^■'""% i '1 "# i /''-''%, i "# x""% i/''% y^'''"% '1/^^. #"■*** 1 //^"-"„ /^^*^ 




TTARDWARE AND METAL'S Salesman's 
A J- Writing Contest aroused the interest of 
retail salesmen in all parts of Canada. Note 
the widely-separated locations of the prize-win- 
ners alone: 

First Prize — Howard Crummer, Cowan Hardware 
Company, London, Ont. 

Second Prize — W. E. Cassidy, Robert Home, hard- 
ware merchant, Sudbury, Ont. 

Honorable Mention — Prize of $1 each: 

George F. Snoad, Blairmore Hardware Co., 

Blairmore, Alta. 

Percy H. Butler, W. H. Thorne & Co., hardware, 

St. John, N.B. 

Francis J. Mclntyre, J. Mclntyre, hardware, 

Whitby, Ont. 

D. MacDonald, Long & Wilson, hardware, 

Walkerville, Ont. 

John E. Meyer, Ayton, Ont. 

Hundreds of the best retail hardware salesmen in 
Canada are close readers of HARDWARE AND 
METAL each week. 

Elsewhere in this issue will be found an an- 
nouncement regarding a Motor Accessory Win- 
dow Display Contest, The prize-winners will be 
announced in the issue of July 27. 

No manufacturer can afford to overlook the im- 
portance of the retail salesman. The best way to 
reach him is through the advertising pages of 
HARDWARE AND METAL. 



July 13, 1918 

/ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



NUMBER, ONE 



WRIGHT BROTHERS 



'N 1896, Wilbur Wright and Orville Wright of Dayton, Ohio, decided 
to abandon several small business enterprises in which they were 
. interested and concentrate their entire force and inventive genius on 
the perfection of a flying machine. Up to the time they entered the field 
no one had ever studied the subject with such scientific skill or such 
undaunted courage. 

The Wright Brothers were masters in all their work. After years of 
concentration they gave to humanity a gift which ranks in importance 
with the noblest achievements the world has ever known. 

The secret of Wright Brothers' success was 

CONCENTRATION 

The same principle of concentration, which enabled the 
Wright Brothers to perfect their Airplane, has enabled us to 
create the Victor Hack Saw Blade — which is recognized every- 
where as the last word in Hack Saw Economy. 

For twelve years we have focused all our force on the 
perfection of this one tool — the Victor Hack Saw. We have 
centered our powers on making exhaustive experiments and 
on the development of new processes. 

Logic told us that by concentrating all our energies on 
one tool, we were more likely to produce a Hack Saw Blade 
which would excel all others, than if we tried to perfect a 
dozen or a hundred different tools. 

As a result of this concentration, we have created the 
most enduring and efficient Hack Saw Blade known to science. 
There is nothing vague about the economy of the Victor 
Hack Saw Blade. It has been proven, 

VICTOR SAW WORKS, Ltd. 
^ HAMILTON, CANADA 




VICTOR 






L.. 



1 



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20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 




Taylor-Fsrbes Harness Hooks and Cattle Leaders 

Two good selling lines that embody all the customer- 
pleasing qualities for which Taylor-Forbes Hardware 
is everywhere noted. 

Show these lines to your trade. Remind them how 
very dependable every Taylor-Forbes product is. 
HARNESS HOOKS are made in sizes 7V2 to 9 
inches, Japanned finish, and are shipped in boxes 
of 1 dozen except the 9-inch size which comes in 
1/2 dozen lots. 

CATTLE LEADERS in 214 and 3-inch sizes, plain 
finish, in boxes of 1 doz. and 12 doz. {o the case. 
Order your supplies now. The largest Hardware 
Manufacturers in Canada guarantee the quality. 



Taylor-Forbes 
Co., Limited 

Guelph, Ontario 




fAinBAHKS HALVES 



COt5R.UGATED 
IfiON V/HEEL. 




fOLLOWerj^lN 
gTUFFINCi- BOK 



Renewable bakelite disc 

y SLIPS OVEri,END OF 
r/ SPINDLE- 

«JUIDES HOLD DISC 
CENTRALL/' 



Renewable Disc Valves 

The only tool required is a wrench to 
remove the bannet. The vise, hammer and 
cold chisel are all eliminated. Once sold 
always demanded by your trade. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 

*' Canada's Departmentat House for 
Mechanical Goods 

St. John, Quebec, Mcnireal, Ottawa, 
Toronto: Hamilton, W'indsor, Winnipeg. 
Saskatoon, Calgary Vancouver, Victoria, 




IM 



2111 





DOOR KNOBS 

CHINA & GLASS 

With Special Canadian 
Brass Mountings 




Canadian 
Drawer Knobs 



JAMES 



CARTLAND* 



SON, LTD. 



BIRMINGHAM, England 



Canadian I GEO. H. SMITH 

Representative • 39 Adelaide St. W.. TORONTO 



// any advertisement interests you, teor it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




21 



•^ 



Original Producers and Distributors 

Iron Worker's Vise 

QUICK ACTING 





Steel Faced Jaws Milled 
Jaws 3%-in. wide 
Jaws open out 5% 
Weight 50 lbs. 
Stationary Base and Jaw 
Painted 

This Vise is fitted with a small thumb piece underneath the handle 
which releases the screw, permitting the front jaw to be instantly 
adjusted to any width of opening, doing away with time lost in 
old type of vise in working the screw to get the proper opening. 

Complete stock of Vises of all sizes and styles 

Produced at The James Smart Plant 



Brockville, Ont. j^LMlh 



Winnipeg, Man. 




22 



HARDWARE AND METAI. 



July 13, 19X8 



WARD & PAYNF 




SHEFFIELD 






A Reputation 

to Maintain 

It is a pleasure for dealers to handle Ward & 
Payne's celebrated tools — for half a dozen 
reasons. 

One is, that there's a reputation back of the 
W & P trade-mark for unvarying high quality that 
greatly assists in making sales. Behind every tool 
marked with the Anvil Brand stands the knowl- 
edge and experience gained in the manufacture of 
Light-Edge Tools for over one hundred years. No 
wonder Dealers like to handle them and mechanics 
prefer to use them. 

Write now to our Canadian 
Representatives for full particu- 
lars. 



Canadian Agents: 

ALEXANDER GIBB, 3 St. Nicholas St., Montreal 

SHERMAN F. AINSLIE, Spadina Avenue, Toronto 

ANTHONY FERGUSON. LTD.. 1 ISO Hamilton St., Vancouver. B.C. 



HARDWARE 
DEALERS 

This sketch illus- 
trates the Simonds 
No. 237 O n e - M a n 
Cross-cut Saw with 
Lion Handle. We 
would like to send 
you our descriptive 
booklet and com- 
plete discounts cov- 
ering Simonds Cross- 
cut, Hand and Jack 
Saws. 

SIMONDS CANADA SAW 
CO., LIMITED 



Guc^r antes cl to Cut 




"The jQwMakerj" 



The superiority of Simonds Crescent Ground 
Cross-Cut Saws is due to the quality of the steel used 
in them and the method of grinding. Crescent grinding is 
an exclusive process, used only in Simonds Savs. It means 
teeth of even thickness throughout the length of the saw, and 
the blade tapered for clearance to the greatest degree 
consistent with strength. ^ This grinding makes cutting easy 
because it prevents binding in the kerf. Write for Booklet. 
Simonds Canada Saw Company, Limited, 

j^jSi^^^^S^jlj^^^^ St. Remi Street and Acorn Avenue, 

MONTREAL, Quebec. S3 

VANCOUVER. B.C. ST. JOHN. N.B. 




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July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



*'That 
Knot 
is in 
the 

Road'' 



This cannot be said of the wall when the Allith Square track 
is being hung, for the adjustable brackets may be moved to 
any position to escape just such obstacles as knots, bad spots 

or cracks. 



PLUG FOR OIL HQi' 



Order a set 
each of Models 
1914 and 1915 
to-day. 




The Allith 
Square Track 

is used for Allith Four-Wheeled Trolley Han- 
gers Nos. 1914 and 1915. 

Both these hangers have qualifications not 
found in any other make. The four wheels 
operate on roller bearings in round grooves. 
This ensures easy running and no side-scraping. 
Trolley travels smoothly even if, as is often 
the case or rough walls, the track becomes 
slightly bent in installation. 

It pays to recommend the best to your farmer 
patrons — don't hesitate to offer the Allith Four- 
Wheeled Trolley Hanger and Square Track. 



Manufactured by 



ALLITH MANUFACTURING CO. LTD. 

HAMILTON, CANADA 




A and B Size 
Correct Lamp Burner 




Photo Reproduction 

Illustrating Flame of B or No. 2 

Correct Lamp Burner 



BURNERS BURNERS 
BURNERS 

"CORRECT" Lamp and Lantern 
Burners GIVE:— 

25% to 50% More light than any other 
Burner manufactured. 
WHITER and BETTER light. 
And mainly, thev give SATISFAC- 
TION. 

The Burner with the Patented FLAME 
SPREADER. 

Every Hardware Merchant should 
carry them. 

Manufactured only by 

The SCHULTZ MFG. CO., LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 

Sold by all Wholesalers and Jobbers. 

Give us your Wholesaler's name and we will send you a 

sample. 




No. 2 Cold Blast 
Correct Lantern Burner 




Photo Reproduction 

Illustrating Flame of No. 2 

Cold Blast Correct 

Lantern Burner 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



24 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 




" Belleville ' 

Hardware 



A "Made-in-Canada" Product 

Equal to the Best in 

the World 

We are all apt to look up to imported 
goods as superior to home-made lines. 
Pause before you concede anything to 
foreign products over "BELLE- 
VILLE" HARDWARE. Here is a 
Canadian-made product that is as 
good as the best. 

"Belleville" hardware is meeting the 
demand of the most particular archi- 
tects and builders, and is recording 
wonderful success throughout Canada. It is a worthy 
Canadian product, worthy of the best Canadian 
patronage. All hardware looks very much alike to 
builders and architects until they have had experience 
with "Belleville." 

Best line for dealers to handle. Has greatest demand. 
Get our proposition. 

Belleville Hardware & Lock 
Mfg. Company 



BELLEVILLE 



ONTARIO 



. FAMOUS 

SHEFFIELD 
CUTLERY 




Gold Medals 



Grand Prix 



JAMES BUTLER. Head ot the Butler Firm lOO years it^o. 




Regd A.D l681 



Butler 

1768 



ART 



l86l 



GEO. BUTLER & CO., LTD., Sheffield, England 
London Showroom, 62 Holborn Viaduct, E.G. 

Address correspondence to TRINITY WORKS, SHEFFIELD 



SPRINKLERS 



"m 





Order the style that best fits 

your lawn. Stock Style D, 

F & J. 

B. Sprinklers are made in four styles so that 
different shaped lawns may be irrigated. They 
do not throw water on side to which hose is 
attached; therefore, may be picked up and moved 
without turning off the water. 

The only Sprinkler that will irrigate the lawn 
right to the edge of the sidewalk without wetting 
the walk. V 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co. 

LIMITED 

OTTAWA, ONTARIO 



MADE IN CANADA 

Blacksmiths' 
Boiler Makers' 
Machinists' 

AND 

Pipe Fitters' 
Tools ^^ogt 



A. B. Jardine & Co. 

LIMITED 

HESPLER, ONT. 



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July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



MADE IN MEDICINE HAT 

PERFECTION SANITARY COOLER 






4-1 

c 



to 

9) 

OQ 




n 

"! 
P 
r* 
(i 

a. 
2. 

dp' 



o 



Complete with Ice Chamber, Cover and Nickel Plated Faucet, 
made of the best glazed stoneware. Price $5.00. 

Medalta Stoneware, Limited - Medicine Hat, Alta. 



J*£«! 



^^Bm^mm^Bmmm 



Wire Nails 

All Standard and Special Gauges 

Nail Wire, Rivet Wire 

Oiled and Annealed Wire — Galvanized Wires 
Plain Barbed and Coiled Spring. 



Dominion Iron & Steel 
Company, Ltd. 



SYDNEY, N. S.; MONTREAL, QUE. 






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26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 




This symbol, on any rubber product, is a warranty 
for quality and service. Behind it is an organization that 
has been manufacturing rubber goods for more than half 
a century. It is a guarantee that the product will stand up 
under the most trying conditions and that its service is 
easily the best to be had. 

The best way to prove our statement is to put our pro- 
ducts to the test. One of our service branches is within 
your reach. Get in touch with that branch and find out 
for yourself how well we can serve you and those you 
wish to serve. 

Everything in Rubber, 
"Made in Canada." 



Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. 

Limited 

HEAD OFFICE - MONTREAL 

Branches at Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Kitchener, 
London, North Bay, Fort William, Winnipeg, Brandon, Regina, Saskatoon, Cal- 
gary, Lethbridge, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 




For the Old Boys 

Yes, and some of the young ones, too, every dealer in Canada carries a 
stock of Black Powder Shot Gun Shells. 

Dominion Crown 

Black Powder 

is the shell that the duck shooter means when he says to you, "Give me 
the Old Crown; I have used it for years and it brings down the ducks." 

The popularity of the Crown is due to its name which is known through- 
out the Dominion — to its price, the lowest of the popular shells on the 
market — to its sure killing power and to the fact that it can be used with 
safety in the cheaper grades of shot guns. 




28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 






FIVE WORKS-OVER 3,000 EMPLOYEES 

It is our intention after the 
War to devote our energies 
to the intensive production of 
the following Specialities : 

Gunmetal and Brass Valves and Cocks. 

Steam, Water and Compressed Air Fittings 

generally. 
Cast Iron Stop and Sluice Valves. 
Semi-Rotary Pumps. 
Extruded Brass and Bronze Bars. 
Brass Bolts and Nuts, Studs and General Turned 

Work from the Bar 
Cast and Malleable Iron Cocks and Pipe Fittings. 
Pressure and Vacuum Gauges. 
Injectors, Engine Governors. 
Spraying Machinery. 
Coppersmiths' Work. 

"Stella" Brand Alloys, Manganese Copper, Sili- 
con Copper, Ferro Zinc, Phosphor Copper 
and Tin, etc. 

Business After the War 

If you arc interested in any or all of the lines 
mentioned and are in a position to take a hand 
in the energetic distribution of the same, please 
communicate with us NOW to our Head Office 
at the address below . 

UNITED BRASSFOUNDERS 
and ENGINEERS, Limited 

EMPRESS FOUNDRY 

Cornbroek, Manchester, England 



July 13, 1918 



23 



"Member Audit Bureau Circulations." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

CANADA'S NATIONAL HARDWARE WEEKLY 



Vol. XXX. 



TORONTO, JULY 13, 1918 



No. 28 



CONTENTS 

Auto Delivery a Live Issue 31 

Stove Styles Will be Curtailed 50 Per Cent 3.5 

Keep up Accessory Window's Interest .* . 36 

One Week More Before Close of Accessory Window Contest 37 

Personal Appeal Wins Farmers' Trade 38 

Shortage of Garage Help Will Assist Accessory Dealer 39 

Editorial Comment^ — ^Surprise Over New Price of Copper. . . .Prices of Steel Pro- 
ducts. . . .Japan in South America. . . .Turpentine Market Reacting. . . .Lead 

Supplies Somewhat Meagre .... Auto.s for Town and Country 40 

Events in Trade 42 

Montreal Paint Firm Acquires Oil Mills 43 

Crozier — Director of Gun-Crowds for U.S. A 45 

New Hardware Goods 46 

Weekly Hardware Market Reports 47 

Weekly Paint Department — Cheap Paint i.-. Dear Paint 54 

Weekly Paint Markets 06 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MacLean's Magazine, Farmers' Magazine. 
Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Printer and Publisher, Boolcseller and 
Stationer, Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, The Power House, The Sanitary Engineer, 
Canadian Foundry-man, Marine Engineering of Canada. 

Cable Address : Macpubco, Toronto ; Atabek, London, Eng. 

ESTABLISHED 1887. 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

GEO. D. DAVIS, Manager and Editor. 

C. L. DUNN, Montreal Representative. G. S. WILLIAMSON, Associate Editor. 

J. C. EDWARDS, Toronto Representative. J. G. LUCAS, Associate Editor. 

E. A. HUMPHRIES, Ontario Representative. A. H. ILLSEY, Associate Editor. 

C. W. BYERS, Western Representative. H. L. SOUTHALL, Associate Editor. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

CANADA — Montreal, Southam Bldg., 128 Bleury St. ; Phone Main 1004. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave. ; Tele- 
phone Main 7324. Winnipeg, 1207 Union Trust Bldg., Telephone Main 3449. 

GREAT BRITAIN — London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain. Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.G., E. J. Dodd, 
Director; Telephone 'Central 12960. Cable Address: Atabek, London, England. 

UNITED STATES— New York, R. B. Huestis, Room 620, 111 Broadway: Telephone Rector 8971; Boston, C. L. 
Morton, Room 733, Old South Building, Telephone Main 1024 ; A. H. Byrne, Room 900, Lytton Bldg., 14 E. 
Jackson Street, Chicago. Phone Harrison 1147. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE — ^Canada, $3 a year; Great Britain, South Africa and West Indies, 12s. 6d. a year: 
United States, $3.50 a year; other countries, $4 a year; Single Copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



30 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 




May we send you this "Cut-out"? 

THE above "Cut-out," beautifully lithographed in nine colors, represents a 
garage equipped with Stanley Garage Hardware. With other automobile 
accessories grouped about it, this display will form a most effective window trim 
that cannot fail to attract the attention of automobile owners and garage 
builders. 



Tt is made of heavy cardboard — can be adjusted in 
a moment. 

The dimensions over all are oO inches long by 36 
inches high. 

Because of the unusual value of this displav, it \yill 
he sent onlv to tho-^c dealers who stock 10-inch and 



24-inch Garage Hinges No. 1457 and the Stanley 
Garage Door Holder No, 1774. If you are not 
already selling these items, your request for a dis- 
plajr should be accompanied by an order of reason- 
able size. In sending such an order please give 
the name of the jobber through whom your Stan- 
ley Garage Hardware is to be shipped. 



Send for this display to-day 

Stanley Garage Hardware is carried in stock 
by the leading builders' hardware dealers 

THE STANLEY WORKS 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 

Manufacturers of Wrought Bronze and Wrought Steel Hinges and Butts of all kinds, including Stanley Ball Bearing Butts. Also 
Pulls, Brackets, Chest Handles, Peerless Storm Sash Hangers ind Fasteners; Screen Window and Blind Trimmings; Twinrold 
Box Strapping, and Cold Rolled Stripped Steel. 

Stanley Garage Hardware is adaptable for Factory and Mill use. 
CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE: 

A. MACFARLANE & CO., Coristine Bldg., Montreal 



If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



Canada's '-' 

National 

Hardware 

Weekly q 




/JND 




Jn Published 
Every 
Saturday 
Since 

1888 



DO 



Vol. 30 



TORONTO, JULY 13, 1918 



No. 28 




Fleet of Delivery Trucks of T. McAvify & Sons, Si. John. N.B. 



Auto Delivery a Live Issue 

Transition Time When Service of Horse is Fast Being Displaced by Automobile 
Consensus of Opinion That Auto Delivery is Essential for Service — Opinions 
Expressed by Various Hardware Merchants Who Use It 



THERE are a number of matters 
for the merchant to consider in 
weighing the proposition of auto 
delivery. Many points have oeen 
brought to the attention of HARDWARE 
AND METAL by merchants who have 
had actual experience in this matter. 
These points might perhaps be summar- 
ized about as follows: First of all there 
is the matter of the merchant's situation 
to be considered. Are the roads good 
enough to use a car without a totally 
disproportionate charge for upkeep? 
Are the store's customers widely scat- 
tered to make it a good investment, and 
is the store's general situation suitable 
for using a car. The great advantage 
to be gained by automobile delivery is a 
quicker service and a wider field. If 
the merchant situation is such that bad 
roads prevent greater speed than a 
horse-drawn vehicle, or if his customers 
are grouped within a narrow radius, 
thsn these two greatest advantages do 
not apply. In such a situation a car may 
even be a disadvantage. For instance, 
several merchants in discussing the mat- 
ter have unhesitatingly said that for de- 
livery in a narrow radius of two or three 
blocks around the store a car is more 
costly and slower than a horse. If fre- 
quent stops have to be made then the 
engine must either be allowed to run, 



THIS is a transition time 
when the horse is being 
rapidly displaced by the 
auto for delivery purposes. 
Many hardware-men have 
already changed to an auto 
delivery and others are no 
doubt contemplating a 
change. The experiences of 
some hardware merchants 
in different parts of Canada 
have been obtained by 
Hardware and Metal and 
their opinion is expressed in 
the following article. 



with a cost for gas, or must be stopped 
at the cost of time in getting startea 
again that many calls are made in a 
small radius may far more than do away 
with the element of speed. Those are 
some points against the system. On the 
other side there are, however, many im- 
portant considerations. 

Improved Service Possible 

First and foremost, there is the mat- 



ter of an improved service. Unquestion- 
ably under certain conditions better ser- 
vice can be given with a car than with a 
horse. In the long haul the horse is at 
a disadvantage, and a delivery that 
might take all day with a horse might 
be made in two or three hours with a 
car. This is a matter of considerable 
interest in the summer time when so 
many summer sections are opening up, 
sections that are usually at some dis- 
tance from the nearest store. In such 
circumstances the store that can give 
the best and most expeditious service has 
gone a long way toward securing the 
business. 

Question of Expense 
One of the important considerations 
is always the matter of expense. Some 
hardwaremen interviewed are of the 
opinion that it costs fully as much to 
keep a horse and rig going as it does an 
automobile. They base their opinion on 
the experience of a number of years 
after having tried both systems. There 
is of course the initial cost of the car 
which must be taken into consideration. 
This is a considerable factor in determin- 
ing whether or not the change shall be 
made. Many merchants are of the opin- 
ion that a moderate-priced car should be 
used and that one-third of the initial 
cost should be written off each year. 



32 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



The question of advertising and pres- 
tige which a store receives is considered 
no small item in the winning of trade. 
Such advertising must be looked upon 
as an important advantage. 

Saving in Help 

Now over against the item of expense 
must be put the fact that one car in all 
probability replaces two wagons witn 
two drivers. The wagons can be realiz- 
ed upon, and the proceeds distributed as 
an asset over the three years. Probably 
one driver can be dispensed with entirely. 
That was not such a big item a few 



would often be 7.30 in the evening when 
the driver would finish his deliveries in 
the busy seasons. With the car this 
never happens and the car is very sel- 
dom out of the garage later than 6 p.m. 
In a city the size of London (about 
60,000) and covering the large space li 
does a motor delivery is not only better 
but is almost a necessity. The distance 
to cover from east to west (counting 
Byron and Pottersburg) is about ten 
miles, and from north to south about 
five miles, and each hardware store has 
this whole ground to cover. 

One more remark about service with a 



to such system of delivery, and there are 
a considerable number of C. 0. D. orders 
each day in the hardware business. 

Advantage in Advertising 

Another thing Mr. Purdom uses his de- 
livery car for is special advertising. The 
car is completely closed in and has doors 
opening at the back for loading and un- 
loading. It is painted a glass black and 
has the name of the store in large gill 
letters on the sides and also has a China- 
man painted on each side, mostly with 
gold paint, advertising the varnish stains 
they sell. 




Accompanying illus- 
tration shows type of 
delivery truck used by 
I.ariviere, Incorporee, 
Montreal. This firm 
thinks one of the great 
needs in motor delivery 
is to see that drivers get 
best service out of car. 



years ago, bat it has become a large 
factor now, making a saving of at least 
$18 or $20 a week. Moreover, it has 
been the experience of many merchants 
that it is easier to get a man to drive 
an auto delivery than to drive a horse. 
And here again it is noted that the driver 
is the all important factor, for on the 
driver depends the question to a great 
extent at least of the cost of upkeep. 

Emphasis on Better Service 

Purdom Hardware Co., London, Ont., 

have been using motor delivery cars for 
several years and have had a good 
chance to try the cars to the same ex- 
tent they tried the horses and wagons. 
The fact that means the most to them 
and pleases them most is the much better 
service they are enabled to give their 
customers and as service is what the 
trade of the store is built on it is not 
only a good thing but an absolute neces- 
sity to give a quick and efficient delivery 
to their customers. This they found very 
hard to do with horses, especially during 
hot weather. They kept two horses ail 
the time and sometimes three, and al- 
though they managed to give two de- 
liveries a day to their trade it was im- 
possible to handle any extra rush orders 
to contractors or emergency customers 
or to make calls at the wholesale houses 
or factories for goods required in a 
hurry. The motor delivery solves the 
problem with ease. The car in use at 
present is a four-cylinder, 40-horse- 
power Studebaker, and it does the work 
of the horse in less time and better, and 
also takes special rush orders between 
times and calls often for goods at the 
factories and wholesalers. Another 
thing the driver gets through earlier at 
night. With the horse and wagon u 



car. T. H. Purdom makes the statement 
that the car was as far ahead of the 
horse and wagon as day was ahead of 
night. He says the expense of operat- 
ing the car is not much greater, if any, 
than the upkeep of the horses and 
wagon and harness. In fact he figures 
that after the first cost the car is the 
cheapest, that- is also allowing for keep- 
ing the car in first-class condition each 
year. For a heavy car such as they are 
using the average cost for one year 
amounts to $408, or $34 a month. This 
cost includes tires, gasoline, oil, painting 
and all repairs. So figuring the present 
cost of feed, etc., it is very little, if any 
more than it would cost for two horses, 
harness, wagon, shoeing and repairs. 

Of course the cost of running the car 
would be less in a city with more pave- 
ments and better roads than in London. 
In some parts of the city the roads are 
very bad, especially during the spring 
and fall seasons. The cost of the upkeep 
of car is a little higher during the winter 
months than in the summ.er. The best 
quality gasoline only is used and an 
average of 14 miles per gallon is what 
their car uses when making a number of 
stops. About twenty miles per gallon is 
the average for long runs. 

Objection to Co-Operctive Delivery 

Mr. Purdom's opinion regarding co- 
operative delivery for the hardware 
stores of London was that it would be 
of little use in the city of London. He 
is of the opinion it would reduce the ser- 
vice he tries so hard' to maintain. He 
could never feel sure his goods would 
be delivered when promised, and if his 
customers claimed they did not receive 
their orders who would be responsible? 

C. 0. D. orders are another objection 



System in Delivery 

The Purdom Hardware Company has a 
set system, while most of the other hard- 
ware stores make their deliveries as the 
orders come in. For instance, if they 
have a number of orders in a day from 
one part of the city they nriight make 
four or five runs that way. They all 
try to cover the city twice in a day, once 
in the morning and once in the after- 
noon. The Purdom Hardware divide? 
the city into two parts and makes one 
trip north and one trip south each morn- 
ing and afternoon at a set hour. 

Cheaper Than Horse Delivery 

J. A. Brownlee, Hardware and Tin- 
smith, London, Ont., has been using the 
the motor delivery for several years and 
finds it very satisfactory and also much 
better and cheaper than his old horse 
delivery. Before using a car Mr. Brown- 
lee kept three horses and two wagons 
busy with his delivering and tinshop 
work. He now does more work (as his 
business is growing) with one Ford 
truck. He has a second truck or delivery 
car that he uses during the rush season 
but finds he is not forced to use it much. 
Besides giving two deliveries a day and 
taking out many rush orders his trucl< 
often takes his tinsmiths and their ma- 
terials to outside jobs and calls and 
brings the men back to the shop when 
the work is completed. 

Pleased Customer 

The morning Mr. Brownlee related his 
experience the truck was just getting a 
iond on for delivery when a customer 
'phoned that she was at her washing and 
her washing machine had gone to pieces. 
She wanted a new machine and a wash 
boiler at once. The distance to go was 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 




Illustration herewith 
shows delivery autos of 
J. A. Brownlee, hard- 
ware, and C . W . Sum- 
mers ^ Sons, both firms 
of London, Ont. 



nearly two miles but the car made the 
delivery and was back to the store aiid 
out with the load with very little delay. 
The sale amounted to $22 and a cus- 
tomer was pleased. With a horse it 
would be almost impossible to do this 
unless the delivery was going that way. 

Mr. Brownlee also believes in using hii 
delivery car for advertising and has it 
decorated in brown and gold. Whenever 
the car is seen in any part of the city 
people are reminded of Brownlee. 

Another good point in favor of the car 
delivery is that at night when the work 
is through a car can be run into the 
garage and left while horses are a con- 
tinual care. As it is hard to get a man 
that understands horses and will look 
after them the owner has a great deal 
of the responsibiMty and sometimes 
much of the work to do. Also most 
hardware men understand a car and can 
personally keep an eye on their delivery 
cars and advise their drivers and often 
save repair bills. They are also in a 
position to buy tires and repairs at right 
prices and have a good idea how much 
a service garage should charge them for 
repairs. One man in the grocery busi- 
ness stated that when he had to take his 
car in for repairs he knew nothing about 
it himself and he believed he paid at the 
rate of five cents for a bolt and $3 for 
putting it in. Most hardwaremen escape 
this by knowing personally about their 
cars. 

Mr. Brownlee does not believe in co- 



using a Ford car and the cost for the 
year 1917 for running same was $347.45. 
This was for gas, tires, oil, repairs, eLc. 
Although this amounted to a little more 
than the horse and wagon they were 
using the service to their customers was 
not to be compared. The car also en- 
ables them to deliver orders outside the 
city where they could not find time fo»- 
h horse to make the trip. One experi- 
ence they had lately in favor of the mo- 
tor car was an order for $43 worth of 
good profit goods to be sent four miles 
out of the city. The car started out at 
4 p.m. after making the regular deliv- 
eries and delivered this order and also 
another order at Byron, six miles from 
London. On the return trip a farmer 
stopped the driver and placed an order 
for $21 worth of hardware. The car 
was back at the store by 6 p.m. and made 
a small trip in town before going to the 
garage. With a horse this trip to the 
country would have been a half-day's 
job. 

The Westman Hardware, Ltd., London, 
IS strong on the service the car enables 
them to eive their customers. The cai 
costs a little more than the horse and 
wagon, but the extra business it makes 
possible to handle more than makes up 
the difference in cost. 

Few Records of Horse Cost 

Few merchants have kept accurate ac- 
count of what it cost to make delivery 
with horses. While the hardwara mer- 



present are using a Ford delivery car 
and during busy times two of them. They 
find the car ahead of the horse and wagon 
in giving service to their customers and 
it also enables them to do the delivering 
for their wholesale carriage warehouse. 
They have been unable to really figure 
the difference in cost between the horses 
and the cars as they have been unfor- 
tunate with one of their cars owing to 
having the wrong size back axle and box. 
However, the fault has been remedied 
and they expect very little trouble in 
the future. 

Says Motor Costs Less 

Summers & Sons, London, Ont., for- 
merly kept three horses and two wagons 
for delivering for their hardware stock 
and grocery store. It, cost about $35 lo 
$40 per month for keep of horses, har- 
ness, wagons, etc. He is now using a 
Ford delivery car painted red and nicely 
decorated. He delivers for both stores 
and also goes uptown, about 1% miles, 
for goods nearly every day at a cost 
of slightly less than $25 per month or to 
be exact, $285 for twelve months. He 
is very much pleased with the car and 
says it saves him a lot of work with the 
horses as the boys he had to drive did 
not understand the care of horses and 
he had to do a lot of it himself. He has 
no set system of delivery but as a rule 
the ground covered is limited to his end 
of the town and there are not many lon^- 
runs. 



First illustration to 
right sho-ws delivery 
truck of J. A. Brownlee, 
London, Ont. Second 
in line is delivery auto 
of Cowan Hardware, 
also of London. 




operative delivery for a city the size of 
London. He thinks it would not be pos- 
sible to give his customers service. His 
trucks or delivery cars are used for both 
long and short runs as are all the hard- 
ware cars of hardware merchants in 
London. The distance these deliveries 
run is from half a block to fifteen miles; 
as goods are often sent into the country 
surrounding London. 

Cost of Delivery $347.45 

O'Dell & Mitchell, London, hardware 
merchants, are also perfectly satisfied 
with their motor delivery. They are 



chants in London keep track of the cose 
of their cars in most cases they did not 
keep separate records of their horse and 
wagon expenses. All hardware mer- 
chants in London agree that the car is 
either cheaper, according to how many 
horses they kept, or if any dearer not 
very much dearer, and they are all of 
the opinion the difference in work is m 
favor of the car. They also claim tha' 
the cost can really only be figured by 
comparing results and the motor does 
get results. 

Ahead in Service 
The Cowan Hardware, London, at 



One point mentioned against co-opera- 
tive delivery is that often a contractor 
or painter comes in or phones in an 
order and says he will be at a new house 
at perhaps 10 a.m. the next morning. 
In the meantime there is no one there to 
sign for delivered goods and the store 
has to arrange to send goods at the 
time requested. 

Affirms Motor Is Cheaper 

Geo. A. McMurtry Hardware Co., St. 
Thomas, Ont., has been using a Ford de- 
livery car for two years. Mr. McMurtry 
says it is cheaper than horses and if a 



34 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



illustration to 
shows delivery 



First 
right 

truck of Cowan s Hard- 
ware and second in line 
is auto delivery of Pur- 
do m Hardware Com- 
pany, both firms of Lon- 
don, Ont. 




man would be willing to spend as mucii 
time in overhauling his car as he has tc 
spend with horses he would have a per- 
fect car and would have no trouble. Mr. 
McMurtry also believes in advertising on 
his car and having it different from the 
other cars. His car is painted an orange 
color with blue letters to match his store 
front. The people of St. Thomas can 
see his store while they are a long way 
off and also his car. It is good advertis- 
ing, he thinks, and helps get business. 

Car Was Too Heavy 

Ingram & Dancy, St. Thomas, have 
used a motor delivery some and are con- 
vinced it would be fine with the righc 
kind of car. Their car was too heavy for 
city delivery so they have not given 
the auto a fair trial yet. However, they 
have just ordered a new delivery car and 
have thus registered their belief in the 
advantage of having motor delivery. 

Repairs Nil in First Year 

D. H. Howden & Co., Ltd., Wholesale 
Hardware, London, have had a 1%-ton 
truck in their service for over one year. 
It is giving splendid service and it ib 



Well Suited for Long Hauls 

The usefulness of motor trucks as com- 
pared with ohrse-drawn vehicles in the 
hardware business seemsi to be dependent 
as much upon geographical and climatic 
conditions as upon purely trade condi- 
tions. For handling heavy goods on long 
hauls, particularly when conditions are 
favorable, there is little doubt about the 
value and economy of the motor truck 
but for short hauls and such work as 
retail delivery, the superiority of the 
truck is at least open to question, ac- 
cording to the experience of St. John 
merchants. 

The first motor truck used in St. John 
for delivery purposes was introtluced in 
1911 by T. McAvity & Sons, Ltd. This 
was a converted pleasure car with a ca- 
pacity of 1,000 pounds and it gave good 
service, the chief drawback being the 
tendency on the part of the drivers to 
overload. Careful record of the cost of 
operation was kept for the balance of the 
year, a matter ^f seven months, to de- 
termine whether the experiment was saC- 
isfactory. In these twenty-nine weeks it 
was found that the cost of operation was 
$700.35 and the chauffeur's wages, in 



a new two-ton truck ordered for imme- 
diate delivery. 

The company maintains its own gar- 
age under the supervision of an expert 
mechanic, who also acts as chauffeur for 
the president's personal car. His duties 
include a general oversight of all the 
cars and the making of minor repairs, 
and the management estimates that this 
oversight goes far in keeping downi the 
expenses of operation. 

Cost of Horses Doubled 

Speaking of their experience with the 
cars, Charles Coster, secretary of the G. 
McAvity Company, informed HARD- 
WARE AND METAL representative 
that, for short hauls and for such woi'k 
as general deliveries, they had come to 
the conclusion that horse-drawn vehicles 
were at least as economical if not some- 
wiiat cheaper than the carsL 

For hauling large quantities of heavy 
material and for long hauls they had 
found that the motor trucks were much 
more economical, besides being^ much 
more satisfactory on - account of the 
greater speed with which the business 
was transacted. To make a big truck 




stated has many advantages over the old 
horse truck. The truck has solid tires 
and there has been no repairs during the 
year. The running and upkeep of the 
big truck has been less than the keep 
of one horse. The car runs about 10 to 
11 miles on a gallon of gas when it has 
to make a lot of stops. Besides doing 
the delivering work the horse used to do, 
the truck does considerable carting and 
saves a good many dollars this way. Also 
the delivery service is much better. The 
delivering is done on a system, one de- 
livery up to the main part of city in 
the morning and one to the east end. In 
the afternoon the truck makes two trips 
to the main part of the city and delivers 
the enclosures to other jobbers and fac- 
tories and does carting. It also delivers 
special hurry orders when necessary. 



those days at $12 per week, totalled 
$348. To this was added a depreciation 
charge of $256.20, twenty per cent, of 
the cost, making a grand total of $1,304,- 
55. The car had travelled 5,800 miles, 
making the net cost 22 ¥2 cents per mile 
The operating charges figured on a mile- 
age basis were as follows: Gasoline, 2.17 
cents; oils, etc.. .56 cents; tires, 3.55; 
repairs, 2.29; garage, .72 and sundries. 
2.80 cents per mile. This was regarded 
as satisfactory and it was decided that 
the experiment was a success. Previous 
to the use of the car, the company hac 
kept five horses, but as additional cars 
were added the business continued to 
grow and, while three horses are kept 
going, there is also steady employment 
for a three-ton truck, a one-ton Form-a- 
truck and a half-ton delivery car, with 



First automobile at 
left shows truck of D. 
H. Howden, London, 
Ont., and second in line 
is delivery auto of 
O'Dell&f Mitchell, also 
of London. 



pay it was necessary to keep it working 
siteadily, but their foundries and metal 
working plants furnished ample business 
to solve this problem. 

As a result of their experience they 
are keeping three horses for the work 
for which they are proving more eco- 
nominal and increasing the number of 
motor vehicles for other classes of work. 
While the cost of operating motor trucks 
has been increasing the ratio of increase 
had not been nearly so great as with 
horses. Their records showed that the 
cost of maintaining horses for delivery 
work had somewhat more than doubled 
in five years. 

Severe Winters Against Motors 

For a general wholesale and retail 
jiardware business under conditions as 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



they exist in St. John, W. H. Thorne & 
Co., Ltd., have reached the conclusion 
that horses suit them better than motors. 
Discussing their experience with a rep- 
resentative of HARDWARE AND 
METAL, James C. Harrison, secretary 
of the company, outlined the conditions . 
which militate against the motor trucks 
in St. John. The first and greatest ob- 
stacle to their successful and economiciil 
operation he found in climatic condi- 
tions. The winters in St. John are se- 
vere and snow usually plentiful. While 
the trucks may be operated through the 
deep snow it is not advantageous oper- 
ation. In spite of the use of anti-freez- 
ing mixtures, radiators are liable Lo 
freeze, with the result that the car will 
be laid up for repairs. With the snow 
banked up on each side of the street car 
tracks' in winter time the cars are badly 
wrenched and strained negotiating the 
sudden jolts, and the many steep hills in 
the city make winter operation especially 
difficult. 

A condition which must be faced in St. 
John and which does not exist generally 
arises from the common use of low "slo- 
vens," the floors of which are swung 
only a few inches off the ground, for 
general hauling. Because of their use 
there is little provision anywhere in the 
city for handling goods from the height 
of the deck of a motor truck or a, high 
lorrey and in handling heavy goods this 
creates a serious obstacle against the 
use of the latter class of vehicles. 

Use Only for Long Hauls 

As regards' the general comparison be- 
tween the motor trucks and the horae 
vehicles, Mr. Harrison pointed out the 
higher investment required for the mo- 
tors, the loss through breakdowiis and 
the time taken out for repairs and 
overhauling and the heavier charges 
while the big trucks are id'i. In other 
cities where conditions were more favor- 
able, he could understand th;tt tb? motor 
vehicles might be more economical an 1, 
even in St. John, for carrying such ma- 
terial as coal, with which there is no 
time lost in loading and unloading and 
where the truck always carries a full 
load, he believed them superior. For their 
business, however, they had decided that 
they could not get along without horses 
and that it was wiser to place their de- 
pendence on them almost entirely. The 
greatest advantage he found in the use 
of the motor trucks was in cases where 
speed in delivery was essential and par- 
ticularly for longer hauls. For such 
cases they would continue to use a motor 
truck and for this purpose they found a 
1,500 lb. motor eminently satisfactory. 

Lariviere Incorporee, Montreal, u.=e 
three one-ton trucks and find them satis- 
factory. They are of opinion they will 
cost little if any more than horses would 
at present with oats so high, and they 
could not begin to cover the territory 
with horses as quickly as with autos 
Greatest need is to watch men. A good 
man will run a car on about 100 gallons 
gasoline per month. Some men ruin a 
car by changing gears when unnecessary 
and not looking after transmission, etc. 
Have been rather fortunate in getting 



men they can depend on. Delivery cost 
has increased about 25 per cent, since 
ihe war broke out. Would cost about $30 
per month to feed a horse. One-ton truck 
can be made to do the work of three 
horses. In city as large as Montreal they 
state they would not be able to cover 
ground with horses promptly enough, as 
they aim to give customers a prompt 
and efficient service through quick deliv- 
ery. 

Require Motors in Montreal 

The James Walker Hardware Com- 
pany, Montreal, are using auto delivery 
only. Not because it is cheaper, for they 
are of the opinion it is not, but because 
of the fact that better service is possible. 
In a large city like Montreal, where the 
distances are so great, horse delivery is 
slow and service cannot be as efficient 
as with automobiles. Two trucks are 
used, one a light %-ton size for lighi 
store deliveries and the other a l^^-ton 
truck for heavier work. This latter is 
used for a certain amount of quick de- 
livery from the depots to the store. 

One of the great evils is that of dis- 
tances. It will be necessary, Mr. Hili 
of the James Walker Company thinks, 
to make a zone beyond which deliveries 
will not be made excepting once a day, 
for the cost of having these points cov- 
ered more than once a day is prohibitive. 
Department stores widened these deliv- 
ery zones and went the limit in making 
frequent deliveries. Mr. Hill is of tiic 
opinion they will readily agree to curtail 
these and that they will probably be 
prime movers in the matter ere long. 
If there is concerted action along these 
lines the matter will work out with a 
minimum of difficulty. For, while thert 



will be many complaints, if the mer- 
chants are agreed upon a plan they will 
be on the same basis and can thus bet- 
ter withstand unfair criticism and loss 
of prestige. 

As to co-operative delivery Mr. Hill 
says that in his opinion it is positively 
unworkable in a large city like Mont- 
real. The delay of at least 24 hours, in 
many cases, would be a real barrier to its 
proper working. Most of the companie.5 
working on this basis carry goods to a 
central depot one day and deliver tiie 
next 

Use Horses Entirely 

"We use horses altogether,'* said Mr. 
Philbin of the M. Philbin Hardware Co., 
Montreal. "In the winter months it is 
impossible to get down narrow streets 
with an automobile. With horses we can 
do as we wish and for some time we have 
been fortunate enough to have good men. 
This is important, for the matter of 
keeping from three to five horses is one 
that must have close consideration these 
days, feed being so high as it is; Not- 
withstanding these high costs we have 
been able to operate our three deliveries 
without a great percentage of increased 
cost. We may put on a light car ana 
experiment with it, but at present car* 
give no data as to comparative costs." 

A. J. L. Surveyor, Hardware, Montreal, 
uses a general delivery, but states that 
it is very slow, deliveries taking from 
16 to 24 hours in reaching customers. He 
is contemplating putting on a light auto 
delivery this summer. They feel that 
they can use one of their clerks to oper- 
ate this and thus keep the overhead 
charge down a great deal. They are not 
satisfied with present way of delivering. 



Stove Styles Will Be Cvirtailed 50 Per Cent. 

Scarcity Pi^ Iron Makes Curtailment Necessary — New Regula- 
tions Will Have Effect of Reducing the Number of Styles 
Also — Will Probably be Fair Supply of Heaters 



IT is highly probable that the produc- 
tion of stoves in Canada will be re- 
duced to the extent of fifty per cent. 
Such is the opinion of the manager of 
one of Canada's largest stove foundries. 
Interviewed by a staff representative of 
HARDWARE AND METAL a few days 
ago, and immediately following a con- 
ference held at Ottawa to consider the 
outlook, this expression comes as a 
timely one. It furthermore will be of 
real potent interest to the many hard- 
ware men all over Canada who handle 
stoves and ranges, for many make this 
a very important feature, often of equal 
importance with any department in the 
store. 

Patterns to be Reduced 

„What was the result of your confer- 
ence with the government heads at Ot- 
ta^^'P' a few davs ago?" he was asked. 

"The outlook is anything but promis- 
ing. Pig iron cannot be had. We are 
already many thousands of tons short 
of our requirements and there will be no 
relief for the present or the near future 



at least. The immense requirements of 
all the existing industrial plants working 
on war orders is absorbing large quan- 
tities of steel and for such uses as the 
manufacturing of stoves there will not 
be enough to supply the maker's usual 
needs. Very little encouragement was 
secured." 

"What would you say the probable 
percentage of reduction in styles at pre- 
sent made will be?" 

"On the average this will be about 50 
per cent. The present styles which 
have all the conveniences used of late 
years on many stoves and ranges will 
have to go, for the time being at any 
rate. It will be a matter of making a 
few standard patterns necessary to meet 
the actual requirements, and in making 
stoves from now on utility will be the 
manufacturer's guiding star." 

Outlook for Heating Stoves 

"Using a great deal of steel, as in the 
bodies of heaters, what will the outlook 
(Continued on page 44.) 



36 



'^ly^, 1918 



Keep Up Accessory Windows' Interest 

To Get Results in Selling Accessories They Must be Well and Frequently Displayed 

— Manufacturers' Helps Used to This End — Build a Background — Make 

Every Window Different — Actual Experiences of a Hardwareman 

Written for HARDWARE AND METAL by A. H. Illsey, Associate Editor. 




View Showing Possibilities for Attractive Window Displays of Auto Accessories. 

Rough sketch showing a suggested window trim of auto accessories. Five tires are used to make basis for background 
and lend attractiveness to display. These are suspended from the ceiling. Backing, ceiling and sides of window are of 
beaver board and 4 inch wood strips used over joints. Three pedestals used to hold plate glass shelves and display flash 
lights, batteries, pliers and specialties. Two or three tires on floor of window and chains loosely placed inside those. Tool 
boxes, ivrenches, pumps, jacks, horns, etc., show up well over blue, purple or green crepe paper or cheesecloth. Many 
changes may be made as to location of pedestals and each display thus made unique in itself. Use of advertising helps made 

on background and window floor. 



I DRESSED my own windows. Not 
that many a merchant cannot well 
in many instances assign this impor- 
tant part of his work to a trusted and 
clever clerk with real initiative. But I 
had none that could create the windows 
I wanted and so I never entrusted this to 
another but spent the necessary time 
each week — or twice a month at least in 
season — in making a display that was 
reasonably sure of making the desired 
impression, if continued, upon the car 
owner whose money I wanted in ex- 
change for the tires, tubes, chains, bat- 
teries, etc., inside my display window 
or my silent salesman. 

How I Changed My Window Background 

"There were two good-sized lights of 
plate glass and the width of the windows 
at the front was about eight feet. Their 
depth was ample — nearly five feet. But 
I did not like the effect at the back. As 
a matter of fact there was nothing at 
the back excepting a built-up solid rail- 
ing some 24 inches high. I never did 
like the open window for a hardware 
store and to this day when I see a dis- 
play that is often good and of much 
merit otherwise, the lack of a back- 



ground has to my mind invariably de- 
prived the author of that display of a 
most impressive effect that might be 
secured were his windows "backed." 

There was plenty of height to the 
window. I looked the situation over. 
If I were going to handle automobile 
accessories on an effective scale and 
make displays that would appeal there 
must be a backing against which to 
show them. 

The window's extreme width was 
about ten feet — a very satisfactory 
width — indeed a more than average 
width for the hardware store window. 
I decided to divide this into two-foot 
widths. To the intercepting divis- 
ion where the transom glass left 
the top dividing strip of the plate 
glass was about 6 feet. Accordingly I sent 
to the lumber yard and bought wood 
strips of suitable length and four inches 
wide by one inch thick. These were oil 
stained, sawed off six feet long and cor- 
responding strips made to attach at the 
top of these and then to the divirling 
strip above the plate glass at the window 
front. A third strip along the back from 
the door entrance to the extreme wall 



of the building served to hold these and 
when all were sawn and placed I had a 
skeleton framework with sections tvv'o 
feet apart between centres. Reference 
to the accompanying sketch illustrates 
this. Before the strips were attached 
a brown oil stain was used and this ap- 
plied with a soft piece of cheesecloth. 
This avoided muss in the window. 

Getting in the Backing 

Now I was ready for the beaverboard 
backing that had been previously pro- 
cured. This came in sheets four feet 
wide and six feet long, so that there 
was no waste. The last sheet to be 
applied at the back was divided length- 
wise, making each part two feet in 
width. The last space was two feet 
wide and this would make the entrance 
and exit for the window-dresser. The 
two-foot panel was inserted when the 
display was complete. 

"Having applied the beaver board to 
the strips above, the window was now 
completely enclosed, the same making 
a neat appearance and every possibility 
of dust being excluded was thus afforded, 
(Continued on page 44.) 



July 13, 1918 HARDWAREANDMETAL 37 

j 

One Week More Before Close of 
Accessory Window Contest 



You, Mr. Hardwareman and Dealer in Auto Acces- 
sories, have some excellent ideas about window display. 

Put them into practice on Auto Accessories and win a 
prize of $io. 

Have a photograph of your window displav taken and 
enter it in HARDWARE AND METAL'S contest. 

First Prize — $10 
Second Prize — $5 
Third Prize — $3 

$1 will also be paid for each window display that receives 
honorable mention. 

Here is a chance for you to show that you are pressing 
the sale of a real live line in the average hardware store. 
The sale of auto accessories is heavy at this season of the 
year. Your display will help your trade. You stand a good 
chance of winning $io besides. 

Photos of windows must be at least 5 inches by 7 inches 
and preferably 8 inches by 10 inches, printed on glossy paper. 
Contest closes July 20 and photos must be mailed not later 
than that date. Winners will be announced in our issue of 
July 27. 

ENTER THE CONTEST— NOW. DO NOT 

DELAY. 



38 



July 13, 1918 



Personal Appeal Wins Farmers' Trade 

W. H. Turnbull & Sons, Brantford, Ont., Believe There is a Big Advantage to be 

Secured From Intimate Acquaintance With Farmers — Make it a Point 

to Talk With Farmers on Market Days 



In the smaller cities 
and towns personal ac- 
quaintance counts for a 
great deal in business- 
getting. In larger cities 
service and quality of 
goods overshadows per- 
sonal element. 




Following story shows 
the emphasis one hard^ 
wareman places on the 
advantage to be gained 
from getting into per- 
sonal contact with his 
customers and prospec- 
tive customers. 



Store of W. H. Turnbull & Sons, Brantford, Ont. 



THAT there is a positive advantage 
to be had in an intimate acquaint- 
ance with customers and prospec- 
tive customers in a particular district 
has been demonstrated by W. II Turn- 
bull ic Sons, Brantford, Ont. Thi>^ is 
•\ truth that needs no demonstr/'iion. as 
many hardware merchants can attest 
thvod: h their own experience that trade 
to a very considerable degree is based 
on the personal touch in any community. 
Acquaintance counts for more in the 
smaller towns than it does in the larger 
cities. In the larger cities the merchant 
is lost behind the appeal which is made 
through his methods and the attraction 
of his store. The personality of the 
merchant is still there, but it is shown 
through his store and the methods he 
adopts. With the hardware merchant 
in the smaller centre the personal touch 
between merchant and customer counts 
for very much in the development of 
trade. 

It has been said that this is a truth 
that needs no further affirmation. But 
it is in the application which W. H. 
Turnbull & Sons have given to the prin- 
ciple that is the point of interest here. 
W. H. Turnbull, the senior member of 
the firm, has been a firm believer in the 
advantage of knowing his customers and 
prospective customers. He does not wait 
for them to come to his store to get ac- 
quainted. He goes out among them and 
makes it part of his business-getting pol- 
icy to cultivate their acquaintance. 

When they come to the city of Brant- 
ford on market days he does not leave 
it to them to come in and see him. He 
goes out to the market where the farm- 




W. H. TURNBULL 

Of the ^ Firm of W. H. Turnbull & Sons, 

Brantford, Ont. 

ers can always be found on those days 
and has a chat with them. From them 
he finds what is going on in their dis- 
trict in the building line and if they are 
likely to need any of the commodities 
which he handles. His chats with the 
farmers are not always in the nature 
of a canvass, but more in the nature 
of a friendly call. Incidentally he will 
ask them what is going on in their dis- 
trict in the way of contemplated build- 
ing of barns. 

Specializes in Eavetrough 

Mr. Turnbull canvasses them more in 
particular with a view to trade in eave- 
trough, as he has specialized on this 
business for a number of years and has 
found a good profit therein. As soon 
as a prospect is unearthed he does not 
lose any time in getting after that pros- 
pect. It often happens that the farmer 
has not immediate need of eavetrough, 
but he does not forget that he has been 



canvassed by such and such a merchant 
when the time comes that he does need 
eavetrough. In fact, W. H. Turnbull 
does not allow them to have a chance to 
forget that he is in the eavetrough and 
hardware business once he has been ad- 
vised that something is contemplated in 
the way of renewal or in new work. 

Farmers Give Tips 

His canvass of the farmers when they 
come to the city on market day there- 
fore keeps him in touch with the pros- 
pective building operations for many 
miles around the city of Brantford. One 
farmer will often give a tip that an- 
other is contemplating building a new- 
barn or making repairs to his preser.t 
one. The market therefore becomes a 
sort of clearing-house for information 
of this sort. It is not difficult to obtain, 
for the farmers are always ready io 
be friendly and give what information 
they possess. They like the personal ap- 
peal which is made to them by a busi- 
ness man who takes enough interest in 
them to call round and make a personal 
appeal. "Let us have an opportur.ity 
to figure on that trough job of yours" 
is the way in which the farmers are 
often asked to give their trade. It has 
invariably happened that W. H. Turnbull 
has been successful in. landing the con- 
"■ract when he has been given the oppor- 
tunity to give an estimate on the cost. 
With a number of years' specialization 
in this work he has come to have a fav- 
orable position whenever a new contract 
is to be figured on. 

Also Makes Calls in Country 

Whenever W. H. Turnbull happens to 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAJ. 



39 



he making a trip into the country dis- 
trict he seizes upon the opportun'ty to 
make calls upon the farmers of that par- 
ticular section. A number of yenrs in 
business in Brantford has given him an 
acquaintanceship with the majority of 
the farmers of the district. If he meets 
them on the road while driving to or 
from the city he seizes upon the occa- 
sion to stop and have a chat with tliem. 
In this way he has developed an ac- 
quaintanceship with the farmers that is 
a valuable asset to his firm. 

Does Not Let Prospects Slip Away 

"Whenever we hear of a prospect we 
do not allow the matter to dror> until 
AC have either secured the order or 
definitely lost it," stated W. H. Turn- 
bull. "There was one instance that I 
recall where I had canvassed a farmer 
for his trough work. He stated that 
he had already ordered another man to 
proceed with the work and had given him 
instructions when he wanted it done. The 
farmer waited beyond the time he had 
set and the man to whom he had ^'iven 
the work had not yet put in an appear- 
ance. I called back on that day and 
asked him if the work had been done. 
He informed me that it had not and that 
if the man did not put in an appearance 
by a certain time he would be prepared 
to give me the contract. I called back 
on the day set by the farmer and the 
other man had not yet been around. The 
farmer was anxious that the woik should 
be done and the result was that we S2- 
cured the contract. And we did not 
delay in getting the work dons in the 
time specified." 

Gets Number in Same District 

Whenever one contract is obtained in 
a certain district W. H. Turnbull en- 
deavors to get other farmers in that 
same district to undertake putting 
trough on their barns. He makes the 
point with them that he can affard to 
give a better price if a number of jobs 
are secured in the district. This has 
worked out to advantage in a number of 
instances and other contracts have been 
secured once a start was made in a 
particular district. One farmer will 
often give the tip that a certain other 
farmer is in need of eavetrough on his 
bam. When it is pointed out to him 
that a more favorable price can be made 
all through if a number of jobs can be 
secured in that district it makes trie 
farmer keener to think of possible pros- 
pects. It often happens that tnc farm- 
ers can themselves put in a favorable 
word with their fellow farmers and this 
always helps to create a favorable sen- 
timent toward securing a number of jobs 
in the one district. Once a start lias 
been made in that district the contagion 
often grows, as it were, particularly 
when it is apparent that their barns 
and buildings need attention. 

Helps Sale of Other Lines 

These methods followed with respect 
to the sale of eavetrough naturally help 
business in other hardware lines as well. 



Barn track and other equipnent has 
olteii been sold as a result of keeping 
closely in touch with the farmers and 
what was going on m tne bai'd-ng line. 
When a new barn is erect 3.1 that always 
offers a good opportunity not only for 
tae eavotrough but for oi,her hardware 
113 well. While W. A. Turnbull has spe- 
cialized in the eavetrough trade it has 
had an advantageous result on the other 
branches of the trade as well. Once 
an recount is opened with a farmer he 
will invariably come ba;K for other 
arl'cles, especially if he has been satis- 
fied with the work and treatment he hai 
received during the first transaction. 
Thinks Building Will Be Good 

W. H. Turnbull is of the opinion thai 
Brantford is due for a period of building, 
activity even in spite of conditions that 
prevail with respect to prices at the 
present time. "There is a proposition 
under way at present for the building of 
some one hundred working-men's dwell- 
ings by a building company which has 
been organized as a subsidiary company 
to one of our promising industries. One 
company states that they will require 
some six hundred highly skilled mechan- 
ics for the manufacture of war equip- 
ment. In order to provide houses for 
them it will be necessary for the com- 
pany to make arrangements. I feel 
sure that when this building proposition 
is definitely started there will be many 
private builders who will take their cue 
and start the erection of buildings also 
All that the present situation needs is 
a leader. Once the private builder is 
assured that a large corporation hao 
faith enough to embark on the building 
of some one hundred houses he will in 
all probability not hesitate to start build- 
ing. I happen to know of some in- 
stances where this has been contemplat- 
ed by private builders. Once the build- 
ing activity is started we look forward 
to a more general resumption of con- 
struction work." 

Other Towns in Same Position 

There are numerous other towns in 
various parts of the Dominion where 
the private investor is just waiting for 
some encouragement in order to embaik 
on various building enterprises. They 
realize that there is a need for dwell- 
ings in many towns and cities but there 
is a certain timidity on the part of the 



private investor owing to the present 
cost of materials. Once the ball has 
been started in the building line there 
are those who look forward to consid- 
erable activity. 



Casualties Heavy 

Among Eastern Men 

Two more maple leaves on the service 
flag of T. McAvity & Sons, Ltd., St. 
John, will glow in gold as a result of 
the sinking of the hospital ship Llando- 
very Castle. Clement C. Scribner and 
Albert Baker, both employed with this 
company before enlisting, are officially 
reported missing and believed to be 
drowned. They enlisted in a field ambu- 
lance unit and were transferred, after 
service at the front, to the work on the 
transports. 

Another employee of the McAvity con- 
cern, Charles Tait, has been reported suf- 
fering from gunshot wounds in the fac6 
and hip. He was a member of a New 
Brunswick infantry battalion. 

Luke ForestelJ, employed with McAv- 
ity's for many years and who was with 
the Canadian Buffalo Forge Company in 
Montreal, when he returned to New 
Brunswick to enlist, has been reported 
wounded in the face and left leg. 

John P. Knight of the staff of W. H. 
Thorne & Co., Ltd., who went overseas? 
with a siege battery, has been wounded 
in the hand with shrapnel and is likely 
to lost part of his hand. 

Captain Ralph Robertson, of the staff 
of the Maritime Nail Company, Limited, 
St. John, is reported seriously ill in a 
French hospital. He went over as pay- 
master with the 104th Battalion and wag 
transferred to an artillery brigade m 
France. 

Daniel E. Oram, who was employed 
with the Thompson Manufacturing Com- 
pany at Grand Bay and the Vulcan Iron 
Works, St. John, before going oversea? 
three years ago, has been reported killed 
in action. His wife and one child sur- 
vive. 

Lieutenant Horace S. Brown, formerly 
of the ofl[ice staff of the Canadian Fair- 
banks-Morse Company, Limited, St. 
John, has been awarded the Military 
Cross for gallantry in action. He went 
over with a divisional ammunition col- 
umn, and wasi transferred to a field artil- 
lery unit. 



Shortage of Garage Help Will Assist 
Hardware Accessory Dealer 



WITH labor as scarce as it is to- 
day the garage man or auto- 
mobile dealer is apt to discourage 
the purchase of some accessories. In 
the past he has been glad to get this ad- 
ditional equipment business and was wil- 
ling- to attach the article to the cus- 
tomer's car, but in many cases he is now 
so short of help that he does not recom- 
mend anything, being satisfied once the 
car is sold and delivered. 

Car drivers really want such necessi- 
ties as, for instance, bumpers, and on the 
Ford cars, tire carriers, robe rails, etc. 



Most of these things are so made that 
anyone can attach them in a few 
minutes, and if the hardware merchant 
made a display of such goods a consider-^ 
able sale would result and the car 
owners would look after the installation. 
HARDWARE AND METAL has al- 
ways considered automobile accessories 
a good logical line foi* th'e hardware 
dealer to take up, and the present short- 
age of man-power seems to be making 
an unusual opportunity for the wide- 
awake merchant. 



to 



llllllllllllIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllIII!l!ri!l!l!l!llllllli! 



July 13, 1918 

lllllllllllllllllllll! 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 
GASOLINE may not be in short supply at producing 
points but the available cars for transportation may 
cause it to be somewhat scarce at the distributing end 
this fall and coming winter. 

* * * 
THE automobile has as yet not driven the horse 
from the earth entirely. At a Dominion Day cele- 
bration in Austin, Man., there was one horse in 
evidence as against some 200 automobiles. Stick 

to it, Dobbin. 

* * * 

PERMIT has been granted by the Dominion Gov- 
ernment to ship some 5,000 tons of manganese ore 
From the Kaslo District in British Columbia to the 
United States. British Columbia has more mineral 
ores than she knows what to do with at present. 

* * * 

FREIGHT rates to certain terminal points in British 
Columbia have been increased on a par with those 
in the United States for certain coast cities. Canadian 
railways do not want to take an unfair advantage 
over their rivals to the South! 

* * * 

THE United States Fuel Administration is going 
to allow each householder only enough coal to heat 
his house to 68 degrees. The amount that' he will 
be allowed is "only so much as is scientifically found 
sufficient" to heat his house to temperature stated. 
There mil need to be a private course in the care 
and upkeep of each individual furnace before that 
amount can be arrived at scientifically. 



SURPRISE OVER NEW PRICE OF COPPER 

KEEN interest has attached to the announcement 
of the new price for copper to the producers in 

the United States at 26c per pound. This is 
an advance of 2 1/20 over price that has prevailed 
for months past. To outsiders who have been watch- 
ing the developments the announcement came as a 
real .surprise. 

But the Government authorities decided after 
weighing all facts placed before them that the in- 
creased cost of production due to higher priced labor 
and transportation was sufficient to warrant an ad- 
vance to the amount granted. 

It is understood that some of the copper pro- 



ducers asked that the price should be fixed at 28c 
pound. Now that the new price has been announced 
the copper interests are stated to be well satisfied. 
They evidently asked a higher price than they ex- 
pected to get. 

This advance in the price of copper will make 
it-elf felt in the Canadian market almost imme- 
diately. Ingot copper and all articles into which 
copper enters will naturally be in a firmer and ad- 
vancing market. 



PRICES OF STEEL PRODUCTS 

AN additional list of steel products on which the 
price is to be fixed by the United States Govern- 
ment will soon come under the jurisdiction of the 
price-fixing committee of the War Industries Board. 
The list is to include steel and malleable castings, 
wire rope and steel rails. 

Heretofore there have been no prices fixed for 
these commodities by the War Industries Board, the 
market being left to adjust itself. The Federal Trade 
Commission has been gathering data in connection 
with production costs of thase various articles which 
will be made the basis for the price-fixing. A con- 
ference over the prices is to held in Washington 
during the latter part of the present week. 

A factor which may delay the consummation of 
established prices for these commodities, however, 
lies in the fact that the Railroad Admini.stration 
must give sanction to any such agreement between 
the producers and the price-fixing committee. The 
four products named play an important part in rail- 
way construction and must, therefore, receive the 
sanction of the Railroad Administration w^hen new 
prices are under consideration. 



JAPAN IN SOUTH AMERICA 

JAPAN is not losing sight of the opportunity of 
securing trade in South America. With Govern- 
ment aid her merchants are making an energetic 
bid to capture the trade that Germany formerly had 
with that country. Japan has sent official and un- 
official business commissions to that country to study 
the trade conditions. 

The result of her efforts along this line is seen 
in the rapid increa.ee in her exports to those coun- 
tries. In the year 1916 she shipped goods to Brazil 
to the value of 69,141 yen and during 1917 the 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



41 



trade had increased to a value of 463,940 yen. 

Japan'^ trade with Argentine! increased from 
1,139,902 yen in 1916 to 3,470,996 yen in 1917. 
Increases in trade were almost equally great with 
Chili and Peru. Altogether the gain in exports 
to the South American countries amounted to 163 
per cent. 

The exports from Japan are mostly notions, 
habutai, .-^ilk handkerchiefs, fans and similar articles. 
They are not articles that are manufactured in 
Canada to any extent. They are cited as showing 
the field which exists for these lines in these coun- 
tries. What is true in the instance of lines which 
Japan can .supply is also true in the case of lines 
which Canadian manufacturers can supply. 

Canadian manufacturers, with the assistance of 
the Government, should be as aggressive in getting 
after the trade that they can handle as the Japanese 
are in getting after the trade they can handle. 



TURPENTINE MARKET REACTING 

AN interesting development in the turpentine 
market has been noted in the Southern markets 
during the past week. There has been a very active 
market for this commodity, as pointed out in these 
columns for some weeks past. There was a recession 
in value of 5c per gallon during the latter part of 
last week and first part of present week. 

This has been looked upon in some of the leading 
market centres as more or less of a temporary re- 
action. In the New York market the price of tur- 
pentine did not follow downward in conformity with 
the primary market. It was natural to expect that 
there should be a lialt in the upward soaring oF 
prices in the Southern centres. 

If reports can be considered authentic which 
have come from the South it would .seem that this 
recession in price is likely to be a temporary con- 
dition. As it has been pointed out heretofore .stocks 
of turpentine in the South are held firmly by factors 
who have provided ample storage space for the same. 

Due to la'bor shortage by reason of the .shifting 
to the Northern industries it is estimated production 
will he cut 40 per cent, during the present year. 
These are factors that should naturally make for 
firm prices. When export abroad again starts an 
even firmer situation can -be expected. 



LEAD SUPPLIES SOMEWHAT MEAGRE 

THERE is a strong market for pig lead at the 
present time due in large measure to the small 
supplies of lead available for immediate use. Gov- 
ernment needs must be met first and the big de- 
mand on this account has caused a scarcity for other 
purposes. 

The market has been in a strong position for 
.some weeks past and locally the prices have been 



moved higher. During the past week the largest 
producer of pig lead advanced the price 15c per 
hundred pounds. Domestic users both in Canada 
and the United States have been ready to pay good 
prices for lead in order to get sufficient to meet their 
needs. 

Since the beginning of the present year the price 
of pig lead in the New York market has advanced 
approximately l%c per pound. On January 5 the 
biggest producer advanced the price to 6.5c p >und 
and the cour.'^e of the quotations has been steadily 
upward since then with the exception of a slight 
recession of i/4c pound on April 11. 

The strong situation in the pig lead has naturally 
placed the products manufactured from lead in a 
strong situation as well. A con.servative policy for 
distribution of stocks by the producers is being adopt- 
ed in order to make available supplies go round. 



AUTOS FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY 

TIE Deputy Minister of Highways of Ontario, 
\V. A. McLean, is authority for the statement 
that there are 31,098 cars owned in the cities of 
the province as compared with 47,377 cars owned 
in towns, villa^ges and rural communities. The 
number of cars in Toronto alone is 14,751. 

These figures are eloquent testimony that the 
automobile is a ve'hicle of nece.'^sity, not a vehicle 
for pleasure. The farmers are a practical lot of men 
and will not make purchases of this nature for the 
sake of pleasure alone. The majority of the cars 
within the province are owned in the small towns 
and rural communities. 

The Deputy Minister a.sserted that the making 
of the small and moderately sized car is a necessity 
if the production of the country is to be kept up 
through a period of labor .shortage. He states that 
the increase in the number of cars owned by farmers 
began some three years ago to counteract the shortage 
of labor, which began about that time. 

It is somewhat doubtful as to whether the short- 
age of labor was really responsible for the increa.<ed 
use of the automobile in the farming communities. 
The farmer, perhaps, hecame convinced more gener- 
ally about that time that there was great utility in 
a car as a time-saver and labor-saver. As labor for 
the farm became scarcer he found that it helped 
him greatly to have tlie use of a car. 

In the first place he became convinced of the 
usefulness of the car. In this he was caught in 
the general ground swell of sentiment all over the 
country. From that it became easily apparent that 
it was a labor-saver. 

With a pro.sperous condition financially in store 
for the farmer he will continue to become one of 
the chief 'buyers of automobiles. Hardwaremen in 
small towns will catch the significance of this trend 
in its relation to the auto accessorv trade. 



42 



July 13, 1918 



EVENTS IN THE TRADE 



a 



miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



IlllllUlillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



Business Changes 

Abbotsford, B.C. — H. Alanson, hard- 
ware merchant, has been succeeded b,> 
H. H. Knoll. 

Sherbrooke, Que.— The firm of T. J. 
Dillon & Co., manufacturers of patent 
window locks, has been dissolved and is 
now registered under the name of 
Thomas J. Dillon. 



Obituary 



Fire Losses 

Graham, Ont. — The entire business 
section of Graham was destroyed by fire 
on July 8 with an approximate loss of 
$700,000. Graham is a divisional point 
on the Canadian Government Railway 
east of Winnipeg. Hamilton Bros.' 
hardware store was one of the businesses 
to be destroyed. 

Toronto, Ont. — The Hughes Electric 
Heating Company has been damaged by 
fire. 



The annual summer outing of the 
Martin-Senour Company was held last 
Monday at Lavaltrie and a good time is 
reported. Although the weather was not 
the most promising some 800 were in 
attendance. The trip was made by tak- 
ing the steamer Three Rivers, and the 
time spent at the grounds was ample 
for a good list of sports. "" 




WILLIAM KELLY 

.Late assistant to the president of Cana- 
dian Explosives, Ltd., and concerning 
whose death an article appeared last 
week. Mr. Kelly was at one time en- 
paged in the bolt, nut and screw business 
in Glasgow, 



B. D. Steacy, one of the well-known 
hardwaremen of Brockville, Ont., died 
at his home in that city on July 4. He 
was 69 years of age. He established his 
hardware business in Brockville in 1881, 
and conducted it from that time until 
his death. He is survived by two bro- 
thers and three sisters. 



Personal 

M. C. Fuller of the Renfrew Refrig- 
erator Company spent a couple of days 
in Toronto on business during the week. 

M. J. Bryan, travelling sales manager, 
Turner Brass Works, Syracuse, 111., was 
in Toronto calling on the trade during 
the week in the interests of his firm. 

J. C. Keenan of the Keenan Wooden- 
ware Manufacturing Company, Owen 
Sound, was a visitor in Toronto during 
the week. 

A. Butchart, representing the North- 
ern Bolt and Screw Co., Owen Sound, 
Ont., has been calling on the Toronto 
jobbing trade. 

Louis McLain, president and general 
manager of the Louis McLain Company, 
Winnipeg, has returned from a buying 
trip in the United States. While there 
he visited the firm's aluminum factory 
and arranged for rush shipments to be 
made. 



Incorporations 

Supplementary letters patent have 
been issued by the Secretary of the Pro- 
vince of Ontario to change the name of 
Canadian Hoskins, Limited, to that of 
Hiram Walker & Sons Metal Products, 
Limited. The capital stock of the com- 
pany has been increased from $40,000 to 
the sum of $250,000. The powers of the 
company have also been extended to 
carry on the business of foundrymen, 
wire manufacturers and machinists. 



Weil-Known Western 

Hardwareman Dies 

Robert F. Hay, president of the Moose 
Mountain Lumber and Hardware Com- 
pany, died at his home in Winnipeg on 
July 4, after an illness extending over a 
month. He was 62 years of age and was 
one of the best-known business men in 
the Western Provinces. The concern of 
which he was head had branches 
throu2:hout the West. Mr. Hay was also 
a director of the National Paving Com- 
pany and was part owner in the Happy 
Farmers' Traction Company, with offices 
and warehouses at Winnipeg and Rc- 




LOUIS McLAIN 

President and general manager of th« 

Louis McLain Co., Winnipeg, who are 

extending their business into 

Eastern Canada. 

gina. Deceased was born at Paisley, 
Ont. He is survived by one daughter^ 
a sister and two brothers. 



Toronto Hardwaremen 

Hold Picnic July 17 

Toronto hardware merchants will hold 
a picnic at Lambton Park on Wednesday 
next, July 17. Arrangements have now 
been practically completed for a good 
programme of sports and other forms of 
entertainment. The evening festivities 
are to consist of a dance. Some excel- 
lent prizes have been donated for the 
various events and it is expected there 
will be keen competition among the con- 
testants. The start will be made from 
Queen's Park at 1.30 o'clock. Hardware 
merchants from outside points are cor- 
dially invited to be present. 



Toronto to Have 

Second Bicycle Week 

The Toronto Bicycle Dealers' Associ- 
ation has decided to stage a second 
Bicycle Week this year. It is to be 
known as a "Mid-Summer Bicycle 
Drive" and the date is from Saturday, 
July 27 to Saturday, August 3. The 
chief feature of this demonstration will 
be newspaper advertising and publicity 
with special window displays. 



July 13, 1918 



11 A K D W A R E AND METAL 



43 



Brandram-Henderson Acquires Oil Mills 

Brandram-Henderson, Limited, Buys Alberta Linseed Oil Mills 

at Medicine Hat — Will Afford One More Important Link 

Toward Controlling Essential Raw Materials 



Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., Montreal 
has purchased the Alberta Linseed Oil 
Mills at Medicine Hat, Alta. The newly 
asquired plant will be under the con- 
trol and supervision of Brandram-Hen- 




GEORGE HENDERSON 

President Brandratn-Henderson, Ltd., 

Which Firm Has Acquired an Oil 

Mill at Medicine Hat. 



derson, Ltd. W. A. Church will manage 
the newly acquired plant. Mr. Church 
has been associated with Brandram-Hen- 
derson, Ltd., for the past fifteen years, 
and for some time was assistant mana- 
ger of the Maritime Division with of- 
fices at St. John, N. B. The services 
of the former manager of the oil mills, 
W. W. McNeely will be retained for 
some time. Mr. George Henderson, presi- 
dent of the company, states that the 
newly acquired oil mill will place the 
company in an independant position in 
the matter of essential raw materials. 
Mr. Henderson also stated emphatically 
that Brandram-Henderson, Limited, is 
in every sense an independent company. 
It has come to my knowledge said Mr. 
Henderson, that statements have been 
made by irresponsible people to the ef- 
fect that our company is closely allied 
with other interests in the paint and 
varnish business. In some cases our 
name has been linked up specifically 
with one of our leading competitors, 
possibly to their annoyance as well as 
ours. These rumors have no foundation 
in fact and our desire is to continue as 
an independent and strictly Canadian 
company." 

The new plant will be enlarged and 
the output increased about 20 per cent. 
It is expected that new machinery will 
be installed in time to enable the com- 
pany to handle its share of the 1918 
flax crops. 



QUESTIONNAIRE SENT OUT BY 
ASSOCIATION 

The following letter has been sent out 
this week to members of the Ontario 
Eetail Hardware & Stove Dealers' As- 
sociation. 
Dear Sir: 

The action of the Paint & Varnish As- 
sociation in cutting out pint and half- 
gallon cans in paint and varnish is felt 
by a large number of dealers not to be 
in the best interests of the retail trade, 
believing that the wrong sizes have 
been cut out, half-gallons especially be- 
ing a "best seller" in most sections. 

The sizes of cans eliminated was de- 
terminated by the Paint Manufacturfers 
Association and not by the Government, 
as many supposed. Your Executive be- 
lieve in conservation and also believe 
that the retailer should have been con- 
sulted before this action was taken and, 
in order to get the views of the members 
of our Association, I would ask you to 
mark on the enclosed card the sizes 
which, in your judgment, should be re- 
tained. 

With this information in their hands, 
your Executive will take the matter up 
with the Paint and Varnish Association 
and do all in their power to have the 
wish of the retail trade carried out. 

Would be glad to have a letter from 



you also expressing your view of the 
situation. Yours truly, 

W. F. MACPHERSON, 

Secretary. 



Western Firm to 

Open Eastern Branch 

The Louis McLain Company, Ltd., 
wholesale manufacturers of aluminum 
ware, etc., Winnipeg, are preparing to 
open up a branch house in Toronto. With 
this in view they have appointed Chas. 
A. Kern to take charge of sales in On- 
tario. Mr. Kern was formerly manager 
for the Peerless Cooker and Specialty 
Co., Kitchener, Ont. E. Roderick, sales- 
manager for the Louis McLain Company, 
has gone east, and will engage salesmen 
to take care of their business in On- 
tario. 



Montreal Tire Man 

Recently Married 

P. E. Temple, manager of the tire de- 
partment of the Dunlop Tire & Rubber 
Goods Company at Montreal, was mar- 
ried to Miss Bertha McEwen, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. McEwen of Notre 
Dame de Grace, on July 2. The cere- 
mony was performed at the home of the 
bride's parents. 



Hardwareman at Head 
of Red Cross Campaign 

A compliment was paid the hardware 
trade of the city of Moose Jaw recently 
during the Red Cross campaign, when 
they chose George J. Morrison, president 
of Morrison-Blackwood Hardware, Ltd., 
as chairman of the committee in charge 
of the campaign to secure $37,000, this 
being the amount which Moose Jaw set 
out to secure. Working under Mr. Mor- 




GEORGE J. MORRISON 
President Morrison-Blackwood Hardware, 
Ltd., Who Figured Prominently in 
Recent Red Cross Drive. 

rison were 26 captains and about 300 
workers. The campaign was a tremen- 
dous success. It wound up with a bur- 
lesque show in the street, at which a 
quilt was auctioned off, producing a very 
high figure. A novel feature of the 
campaign was' the use made of a vacu- 
um cleaner, over $600 being pulled in 
from the crowd that way. 



Montreal News Notes 

Hardware, Limited, have removed 
from 240 Lemoine street to 317 St. 
James street. They do a retail and a 
wholesale jobbing business in auto ac- 
cessories and tools as well as in other 
specialties. 

M. H. Day, general manager, and H. 
L. Rutherford, also of the Consumers' 
Cordage Company, are in Halifax this 
week in connection with repairs to the 
plant at that point. 

R. H. Hancock, representing the Os- 
iborn Manufacturing Co., 395 Broadway, 
New York, is calling on the Montreal 
trade. 

L. E. Griffith, of Surpless, Dunn & Co., 
New York, is in Montreal this week. 

Bruce Morrow, manufacturer's agent 
of Toronto, is a visitor to Montreal. 

W. S. Leslie, president of A. C. Leslie 
& Co., Ltd., spent last week at Kenne- 
bunk Beach. 



44 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918, 



Marititime Hardwaremen 
Hold Annual Meeting 

The annual meeting of the Maritime 
Wholesale Hardware-Men's Association 
was held in St. Andrew's, N.B., on July 
3 and 4. There was a representative 
gathering of members and visitors allien 
with the hardware business and the ses- 
sions proved interesting and profitable. 

Among the members present were: H. 
W. Emerson, the retiring president, and 
A. Armstrong, the retiring secretary, 
both of Emerson & Fisher, Limited; J. 
A. Tilton, of W. H. Thome & Co., Ltd.; 
Major P. D. McAvity and S. C. Hoyt of 
T. McAvity & Sons, Limited; R. M. 
Bartsch of the S. Hayward Co., Ltd.; 
F. A. Foster of Foster, Robertson & 
Smith, Ltd., and George B. Rivers of the 
McClary Mfg. Co., all of St. John; F. R. 
Sumner and R. P. Dickson of the Sum 
ner Co., Ltd., Moncton; J. R. Simmons of 
James Simmons, Ltd.; C. J. Metzler and 
C. W. Stairs of William Stairs, Sons & 
Morrow, Ltd.; L L. Crowell of William 
Robertson & Sons, all of Halifax; W. H. 
Spinney of C. K. Spinney, Ltd., Yar- 
mouth, and H. N. Steams of Amherst. 

The visitors include^d H. W. Ferris of 
Sergeant & Co., New Haven; W. H. Bell 
and H. W. McBride of H. Disston & Sons, 
Ltd., C. E. Heustis of the Maine Axe & 
Tool Co.; H. A. Marvin of the Maritime 
Nail Co., Ltd., St. John; Major G. ?.I. 
Johnston and William Knodell of J.?,mes 
Pender & Co., Ltd., St. John, H. G. Rog- 
ers and L. M. Farquahar of the Steei 
Company of Canada. 

The election of officers resulted in the 
choice of the following: President, G. -3. 
Metzler, Halifax; vice-president, R. P. 
Dickson, Moncton; additional members 
of executive, I. L. Crowell and J. R. Siin- 
mons, Halifax; W. H. Spinney, Yar- 
mouth; R. M. Bartsch, P. D. McAvity, 
and John F. Tilton of St. John. The sec- 
retary will be appointed by the presi- 
dent. 



ACCESSORY WINDOW'S 
INTEREST 

(Continued from page 36.) 
The beaverboard had, of course, been 
tinted before it was nailed on with small 
brads. A light buflF shade was used to 
good purpose and looked well. 
A Sample Display 

"My materials to be used in each dis- 
play were looked over and made ready 
before the window was to be dressed 
each time. If there was any cleaning 
to be done in making the various lines 
ready for the window this was assigned 
to my assistant. He did this betwe'^n 
times and if possible I had him lay 
these out and bring them to the window 
for me so that my time was saved as 
much as possible. I found that during 
the progress of building up each disnlav 
it was possible to use various quantities 
of lines that could not be decided upon 
earlier. Sometimes I used a purple 
OT blue shade of crepe paper for ihe 
back and the side of my window. This 
was effective in that the tires and other 
lines stood out well against it. 

"My first idea, in many of the displays 



made, was that of using tires well to- 
ward the back. These tires even from 
the opposite side of the street 
would attract those interested. They 
were suspended very often from 
the ceiling on heavy cord. This was 
almost invisible and occasionally this 
was covered with crepe paper of the 
same shade as used elsewhere in the win- 
dow. Probably three regular stock tire^ 
would answer — sometimes there wouid 
be as many as five. Occasionally t:re 
chains were neatly distributed over the 
back. 

"A few wood boxes of any size avail- 
able were secured. These, placed about 
the floor of the window were covered 
with similarly-shaded crepe paper anr! 
the bottom of the window was then 
ready for the various articles I wanted 
shown. These included tire pumps, 
chains, dry cells, flashlights, horns, 
speedometers, inner tubes, tool boxes, 
head and tail lights, incandescent bulbs, 
auto oils in lithographed cans, headlight 
lenses and a score of other specialties. 
The raised boxes served well to relieve 
the otherwise ordinary and commonplace 
showing on an unbroken window floor 
and served as 'steps' toward the back 
of the window, the tires abo.'e being 
placed so as to make the vvh.ole effect 
appear pleasing and effective. Very of- 
ten I used odd lengths of plate glass on 
pedestals of different heights, which are 
easily made. 

Cards were prepared and placed a- 
bout the window near the various lines 
displayed giving information and prices 
in plain figures. The advantage of 
these price tickets was generally ap- 
preciated by an interested prospect and 
the plain price announcement to the 
public indicated the one-price principle 
adhered to by the store. 

Use of Manufacturer's Cards 

While I never followed beaten paths 
in the displays made, in every possible 
instance the cards and lithographs and 
the attractive selling helps sent out by 
the manufacturer and jobber were al- 
ways made use of in the best possible 
manner. Careful of these when not in 
use they were ever ready when a win- 
dow was to be trimmed and they could 
be used several times. 

One of the objects never overlooked 
was that of endeavoring to make each 
window stand out as distinctive and 
draw prospects to it on its own merits. 
Time spent in this way was never con- 
sidered wasted. 

And as a further help attention was 
usually drawTi to the display through 
the newspaper advertising which always 
formed a part of my selling policy. 

M. O. Crowell, president Crowell Bros. 
Ltd., Halifax, N.S., accompanied by Mrs. 
and Miss Crowell, is on a two weeks 
trip visiting Toronto and Niagara Falls. 
Mr. Crowell also attended the convention 
at St. Andrews, N. B. 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

FARDWARE SALESMAN WANTED AT ONCE 
One with several years' experience. State 
age and salary. Box 391, Hardware and Metal. 



H^ 



STOVE STYLES WILL BE 
CURTAILED 

(Continued from page 35.) 
be for the dealer getting what he re- 
quires of these?" 

"We are now working on our Fall 
output and we have this stock ahead to 
begin with," was the reply as the writer 
was shown through the storage floors 
of the large foundry building. 

It is very apparent, however, that the 
supplies which makers have been able 
to lay up against the demand to come 
are not at all large, and in view of the 
fact that this manufacturer as well as 
many others will probably not have 
made a great deal of headway as yet in 
piling up even moderate stocks the out- 
look here is not too encouraging. It 
was stated, however, that there will be 
a fair supply of heating stoves before 
the cold weather comes. 

Dealers Have Bought Sparingly 

It was stated by the manager in ques- 
tion that stove retailers had been buying 
sparingly. This is to be accounted for 
from the fact of prices being high and 
and also because some dealers very pro- 
bably expected that stoves would be 
cheaper rather than higher. In view 
of the facts presented, therefore, and in 
addition to which it must be borne in 
mind that no more furnaces have been 
or will be blown in to add to the pre- 
sent production of pig iron, the outlook 
as stated would seem to be founded on 
facts that have to be squarely faced. 

It was suggested that some relief 
might probably be afforded through the 
reduction and use of old scrap but this 
manager was of the opinion that it 
would be a very small factor. "This 
class of iron is not of much value to us 
in the production of the stoves we 
make," he stated. 

The Labor Question — Prices 

One of the re-assuring features so far 
as the foundry in question is concerned 
was the sufficiency of the labor supply. 
The management has very fortunately 
not been worried to any extent over the 
matter, the class of men they require 
being available in fair supply and the 
important consideration thus troubling 
so many manufacturers is not evident 
here. 

"Prices will, of course, be higher," was 
suggested. "There will undoubtedly be 
an increase in the prices for stoves, for 
with a decreasing supply of raw mater- 
ial on such a scale as this but one thing 
can happen, — advances will surely be 
made." 

About Entry U. S. Stoves 

"W^hat was done with reference to the 
barring from the Canadian market of 
rtoves made in the United States? 
There is a rumor that these would be 
placed on the embargoed list." 

"It is to be expected that the manu- 
facturers of stoves here will look for 
some such action to be taken if they 
are not to be allowed the essential sup- 
ply of pig iron. Nothing has been done 
yet but this is a consideration that will 
very likely receive attention." 



July 13, 1918 



45 



-^llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



lllllllllllllllls 



THE CLERKS DEPARTMENT 



CROZIER — CREATOR OF 

GUN-CROWDS FOR U.S.A. 



An Austere Tussler With Every Sort of Handicap, but a 

Man Who Has Won Out by Force of Will is 

Chief of the U.S. Ordnance Department 



T T is said that the Allies are content 
*■ to-day to hold the front against 
enemy onslaughts, letting the Kaiser's 
legions litter the earth with their 
dead, until the American armies arrive 
in sufficient force to help sweep the 
Huns backwards across devastated 
Belgium in forced retreat that may 
quickly become rout. There are 
many who think of that time in terms 
of men: there is one man in the 
United States who can think of it 
only in terms of guns, guns, guns. 
That man is Major General William 
Crozier, Chief of the American Ord- 
nance Department. He does not be- 
lieve that the United States armies 
can ever have too many guns to do 
the work that is ahead of them. 

"With guns enough you can win 
this war without the terrible losses of 
the past," he says. "Without guns 
enoug'h," he adds, "vou may lose 
thousands of men in fruitless efforts, 
and may even lose the war. There is 
not a man who has lived on that 
bloody line in Europe who will not 
agree." 

That was said some time ago. 
Events seem to prove more and more 
the paramount importance of guns. 
General Crozier is justified in his be- 
liefs. American soldiers know him as 
"The Man Behind The Guns." He 
does not theorize. He works. He 
works prodigiously. Here is the start 
of his day: 

The Genera! sleeps in the open the year 
around in a garden adjoining his resi- 
dence. He arises promptly at 7.40 and 
leisurely shaves himself and takes a colu 
plunge. At 8.30 he eats a substantial 
breakfast, generally with meat, and 
leaves for the office, reaching there at 
9.30. Then comes a day of continuous 
work at his desk until nearly six o'clock. 
Lunch is taken at the desk, consisting ol- 
most invariably of a pint of milk and a 
raw egg. It is brought in a thermos 
bottle from his home. 

His Helpmeet and His Horse 
A few minutes before six each evening 
Genera] Crozier mounts his saddle horse. 
a horse he has had for years, and for an 
hour he rides around Potomac Park. 
Some part of the time is spent in hurdl- 
ing, for the horse is a good jumper. The 
. General returns to his house at seven 
and at 7.30 he has dinner. Dinner out of 
the way he returns to the office, which he 
never leaves before midnight. He seldom 



stays beyond one o'clock, for Mrs. Crozier 
makes it her business to see that her 
husband knocks off from his work at that 
hour. 

Sundays, since the outbreak of the war. 
General Crozier spends from four to six 
hours at the office. The rest of the 
daylight hours are given over to a tramp 
in the wood with Mrs. Crozier. 

General Crozier at sixty-two is per- 
haps the most prodigious worker in the 
entire War Department personnel. That 
he carries his age lightly and is able to 
employ a mind that responds as quickly 
and as clearly as it did thirty years ago 
is due almost entirely to the tremendous 
will-power of the man. For General 
Crozier has battled successfully against 
physical handicaps that would have 
floored any but the most doggedly deter- 
mined sort of a fighter. 

He has been compelled to undergo more 
than six operations of a major character. 
With his life at stake he has continued at 
his tasks. He has directed the work of 
his office from a sick room which his 
friends believed he never would leave 
alive. 

Battling against ailments of a most 
serious character. General Crozier has 
kept going at top-notch speed by reason 
of a rigorous form of living routine, 
and to-day he is working as long hours 
as any man in the department. 

Once Under Departmental Fire 

A visit with the Chief of the Ordnance 
Buieau had been arranged for the Louis- 
ville 'Courier Journal" to enable a more 
or less intimate portrayal of Gen. Crozier 
who recently has passed through a gruel- 
ing examination as to his stewardship 
in the most vitally important bureau of 
the War Department, a bureau charged 
directly with supplying American troops 
with guns, big and little; shot and shell. 

To reach General Crozier, such are the 
demands of his present job, one must 
pass sucecssively inquisitorial persons on 
four doors, doors now referred to as first, 
second, third and fourth-line trenches. 

Once in, however, the visitor is con- 
fronted by a man who, while blunt and 
terse in his manner of talk, is at the 
same time frank and genial. 

The General was occupying a severely 
plain, armless, hard-bottomed wooden 
chair. It is a chair that one would expect 
to find in the furnace-room of a building. 
It is, however, typical of the man. The 
General uses this exceedingly uncom- 
fortable chair simply because, as he ex- 
in the field and at various desks he has 
plained, he does not like to loll about 
or relax even for a moment while at the 
office. This no man could do in such a 
chair. It constitutes a perpetual admoni- 
tion to be up and doing. 

"That Power In His Eye" 

In build and appearance, aside from the 



straightness of his carriage, General 
Crozier is not of the popularly imagined 
military type. He has rather an indif- 
ferent chin and neither the mouth nor 
the nose gives any clue to the character 
of the man. 

It is from the eyes up that General 
Crozier draws attention, save, possibly, 
for an iron-gray mustache that calls for 
a second look because of its natural ten- 
dency to droop downward in pacifist 
differentiation from the fiercely military 
upward twirl of the Hohenzollern 
model. 

The Crozier eyes are remarkable. Flash- 
ing black they compel attention again 
and again. They are the most striking 
characteristic of the man, and are topped 
by a broad forehead. 

Of the General's forty-one years of 
experience considerably more than half 
have been devoted to the Ordnance 
Bureau during the period when the heads 
of the War Department and the military 
advisers of the Government have, for the 
most part, been compelled to right day 
and night for even such scanty appro- 
priations as were secured for military 
preparedness. 

During all this period General Crozier 
has been at the forefront of those urg- 
ing, pleading, and even begging the legis- 
lative branch of the Government to make 
possible something like adequate prepar- 
ation against the possibility of war. 

Forget It and Get on With War 

But General Crozier is not of the "I 
told you so" sort. He refused to assume 
the responsibility for any part of the 
country's so-called unpreparedness, and 
says that the thing to do now is to for- 
get the past and pitch in and prosecute 
the war successfully. Having been vin- 
dicated by his superior officers he is 
not fretting, and if he feels any resent- 
ment he carefully conceals it from public 
view, and is not worrying about what the 
public thinks. 

With all this General Crozier is far 
from being unmindful of both the need 
of well-inf6rmed public opinion and its 
power. 

"That I have not been out of the 
Ordnance Bureau months ago is simply 
a miracle," said the General. "That Eng- 
land and France are able to equip us 
with heavy ordnance for the first year 
and a half of the war is a thing that 
would not happen once in a thousand 
times. It is a miracle, that is all — a 
miracle that has saved the United States. 
Had it not been so, unquestionably public 
opinion would have forced changes and 
my head would have fallen. It would 
have fallen notwithstanding my record 
of having preached early and late for 
preparedness." 

A Distinguished Career 

Graduated from West Point in 1876 at 
the head of his class in studies. General 
Crozier has given forty-one consecutive 
years to the military service of his coun- 
try. During that time both for service 
repeatedly been marked by his superior 
officers for distinguished accomplish- 
ments. 

These commendations relate to service 
in the field, in the Indian uprisings of the 
late seventies, in the Philippine cam- 
paign, and during the siege of Peking. 
•For the others the commendations deal 
with his work as an inventor. 



46 



July 13, 1918 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllifflllllllllllllllll^ 



NEW HARDWARE GOODS 

OFFERED TO CANADIAN HARDWAREMEN 



ii!lllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli!lllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllll^^ 



REPLACE REAR CURTAIN LIGHTS 

A new article is being placed on the 
market by the Powers Manufacturing 
Company, Waterloo, Iowa, in the shape of 
celluloid curtain lights to replace broken 
curtain lights in back of Ford cars. It 
is claimed for this article that all that is 
necessary to attach it is simply to loosen 
the top sufficiently to get some slack in 
back curtains. Powers replace lights 
can then be attached with fasteners fur- 
nished. The article is stated to be made 
of heavy, clear, transparent celluloid. 
Edges are bound with gimp to match the 
curtain. They are fitted with fasteners 
and washers for attaching and if desired 
they can be sewed into the curtain on an 
ordinary sewing machine. 




Powers Rear Curtain Light 

NU-WAE ATTACHMENT 
The Relax Company, of Norwood, 0., 
is introducing the Nu-Wae attachment 
used for all gasoline or kerosene engines, 
which, it is claimed, increases mileage 
from 10 to 30 per cent, more per gallon 
from gasoline. It is installed on the dasn 
of any make automobile, and a tubing 
leading to the intake manifold, which is 
shaped in a coil, is fastened to the ex- 
haust manifold.- This heated air, it is 
claimed, breaks the raw gasoline glo- 
bules and forms a gas that properly ex- 
plodes. It is further stated that the use 
of the Nu-Wae attachment requires less 
gas and, therefore, the carburetor must 
be turned off at least quarter-turn. It 
is stated a Nu-Wae attachment can be 
used successfully for removing carbon 
from the cylinders by using water which 
is fed through the air or primer hole 
from the dash. This water as it passes 
the red hot tubing becomes a steam and 
is fed into the cylinders; the moisture 
from this steam loosens up the collected 
carbon and discharges it through the ex- 
haust. The company also states that it 
can be used successfully for a prime. 



NEW STARTER 

The Relax Company of Norwood, Ohio, 
is placing on the market the Relco sim- 
plex starter, which, they claim, is guar- 




NuJVae Attachment 

nteed to turn the engine over one com- 
1 lete turn, whereas other starters usually 
nly turn the engine over quarter-turn, 
iving you the advantage of the firing 
f all four of the cylinders, instead of 
ne. It is equipped with a foot primer 
or choke to prime the engine from the 
seat; has a safety device when the engine 
back fires, and, it is claimed, prevents 
the misfortune of breaking or spraining 
the arm. It is simple; therefore, we 
have given it the name Relco-Simplex 
starter. It is claimed, in case that you 
should stall the engine on a railroad 
track in front of a fast train, you could 
pull the starter and start your motor 
quicker than you could jump. The Re- 
lax Company guarantees this starter to 
save its price in gasoline on short stops, 
as you turn off your engine instead of 
leaving it run. 




COMBINATION SWITCH KEY 

The Handy Dandy Ford combination 
switch key is a new product manufac- 
tured by the Relax Company, of Nor- 
wood, Ohio. They are packed 100 to a 
box, and are brass plated. There are five 
different combinations— a switch key, 
screw driver, alligator and coil box 
wrench for a Ford, bottle opener, Presto 
light or key ring opening. It is also 
stamped for reference to the engine 
number in case of theft. The company 
will also stamp the name of firm on the 
key if desired for advertising purposes. 



WIRE SCREEN RACK 

Three new products are being placed 
on the market by the Evan L. Reed 
Manufacturing Company, Sterling, 111., 
in their wire screen rack, motor tire 
rack and stepladder and stool. The 
"Crackerjac" wire screen rack is stated 
to be made of iron and band steol with 
casters on bottom, blue enamel finish. 
Dimensions of base are 26 x 25 in It is 
claimed that the wire cannot unroll when 




ELAx Company 

PAT. I JPEND 
FORD ENGINE N 



THE 

ANDY 

Dandy 




LJkCev, 



Relco Simplex Starter 



Combination Switch Key 

placed in this rack owing to clie shape of 
the space in which the roll of wire re- 
poses. It is designed to hold from 12 
inch to 48 inch lengths. 

The Crackerjac step ladder aiid stool 
is designed so that the lock under the 
top of the stool can be released, enabling 
it to be folded up in small space. This 
article is made in two styles and three 
sizes. 

In the Crackerjac motor rack it is 
stated the tires rest on round rods, hav- 
ing thereby no sharp edges to injure. 
Each section is divided into six com- 
partments, preventing tilting of tires. 
It is claimed for it that it will acccm- 
modate twelve of the largest size tires 
or more of smaller ones. Space between 
sections is 6% inches, height of rack 
^OVz inches, width 40 inches, depth be- 
tween uprights 14 inches, length of base 
30 inches, weight of rack 85 pouud.=? a ad 
crated 115 pounds. 



July 13, 1918 ■ 



47 



WEEKLY HARDWARE MARKET REPORTS 

STATEMENTS FROM BUYING CENTRES 



THE MARKETS AT A GLANCE 

THE 30c advance in the price of flaxseed during the 
week, coupled with the placing of an embargo against 
further shipments from the Argentine, has proved 
a factor in the sharp advance in linseed oil, ranging from 
7c to 14c per gallon. The question of supplies is increas- 
ingly difficult, and a recession in present prices before new 
crop seed is available is not looked for. Crop reports as yet 
are rather indefinite to have a direct bearing on the market, 
but the reports from the West have taken on a somewhat 
pessimistic tone. The future cannot be determined under 
unusual conditions existing and that may develop. Tur- 
pentine has also attained higher levels, another 3c advance 
being made in some quarters, while others have withdrawn 
prices altogether until further supplies are available. 

Revised prices have been issued on wrought iron pipe 
providing for an advance. Pipe fittings have also under- 
gone revision upward, both malleable and cast being 
affected. Valves, compression bibbs, stop and waste cocks, 
basin and bath cocks are all now selling on a new scale of 
discounts which bring net prices to higher levels. 

Some shipments of ingot tin have come to hand, but 
have been absorbed. Supplies to arrive are largely sold, 
though when further shipments will reach Canada is not 
known definitely. Prices are holding high, and offers of as 
much as $1.50 per pound have been made in an endeavor 
to secure spot stocks. Lead remains very firm, and spelter 
holds steady, while antimony records an advance of 2c 
per pound under increased demand. 

A revision in values on solder has been made, and quota- 
tions now ruling are substantially below those prevailing for 
some time past. Lead pipe is holding steadily at advances 
established last week, and other manufactured lead pro- 
ducts are unchanged. 

Many miscellaneous though important lines in the hard- 
wareman's stock have been changed during the week. In 
the list will be found blow torches, fire pots, thresher end- 
less belts, semi-rotary wing pumps, sweeping compound and 
tie-out chains, all of which have registered advances. 



MONTREAL MARKETS 



MONTREAL, July 11.— This week's 
changes are not very numerous 
in the regular hardware lines but 
it is anticipated that some considerable 
changes will be made in the near future 
on various manufactured goods. As has 
been predicted in HARDWARE AND 
METAL for several weeks higher prices 
were likely to obtain for tools and shelf 
hardware. One of the most interesting 
announcements yet made is that with 
reference to the finish of tools such as 
planes, screwdrivers, braces and tools 
made largely of wood. The finish on 
these will hereafter be less highly m.ade 
and cheaper woods are to be used for 



various handles. Special reference to this 
is made elsewhere. Wrought pipe is high- 
er, fibre pails, wash boards, knife handle 
wrenches, lead pipe, and roofing nails. It 
is very hard to secure supplies of steel 
blocks, one jobber reports. The nail mar- 
ket is strong with tendencies of a firming 
nature. The state of trade is on the quiet 
side. Various changes are made in auto 
accessories — mostly of an upward nature. 

Washboards up 15%; 
Knife Handle Wrenches 

Montreal. 

WASH BOARDS. WRENCHES.— Ad- 



vances approximating about 15 per cent, 
have been made in the price of wash 
boards. This applies to the various lines 
including those of glass manufacture and 
prices will be found in the current quota- 
tions. Goes genuine knife handle 
wrenches are also on a higher price basis. 
The advance is around 10 per cent., the 
10 inch being quoted at $21 per dozen and 
the 18 inch at $48. 

Malleable Fittings and 
Wrought Pipe Advance 

Montreal. 

FITTINGS AND PIPE.— Advance 
made this week in the price of malleable 
fittings totals about 7% per cent. Quot- 
ations given in the current list show the 
range to cover these. Black and galvan- 
ized pipe prices are up and new prices are 
as follows, the price of black being the 
first mentioned: Vi and % inch, $5.22- 
$7.35; 1/2 in., $6.64-$8.21; % in., $8.40- 
$10.53; 1 in., $12.41-$15.56; ly* in., 
$16.79-$21.05; IV2 in., $20.08-$25.17; 2 in., 
$27.01-$33.86; 21/2 in., $43.30-$54.12; 3 in., 
$56.62-$70.77; 3V2 in., $71.76-$88.78 and 
4 inch $85.02-$105.17. 

Roofing Nails $22.00; 
Fibre Pails Advance 40c 

Montreal. 

ROOFING NAILS, PAILS.— An ad- 
vance of $2 per keg is made in the price 
of simplex roofing nails and these are 
now selling at $22 per keg. The advance 
is effective at once. Fibre pails, selling 
at a previous price of $4.60 per dozen are 
now $5.00, per dozen. 

Prices Again Revised 

For Auto Bumpers 

Montreal. 

AUTO BUMPERS.— New quotations 
are given on bumpers. These are of Lyon 
make and the new trade prices in single 
lots are, for the No. 102, $16.12 and also 
for the No. 26 the same price applies. Nos. 
8 and 18 are both selling now to the trade 
at $13.95 each. For the above lines in 
lots of six the price each is $15.05 for 
No. 26 and 102 and for the No. 8 and No. 
18, $12.92. These are net quotations. 

Higher Prices For 

Engine-Driven Pumps 

Montreal. 

TIRE PUMPS. — Prices have been 
changed on types of engine-driven tyre 
pumps. Crane pumps, all makes from No. 
31595 to 31604 are advanced, trade price 



48 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



of $11.25 as obtaining before being super- 
seded by one of $13.88 each. Kellogg en- 
gine-driven pumps are quoted now at 
$17.60 each for models 101-201 and at 
$14.80 for the front end drive pump. 

Wire Wheels, Cranes 

and Stands Revised 

Montreal. 

AUTO ACCESSORIES.— Wire auto 
wheels of House pattern are moved up to 
higher levels this week. The prices for 
black, white and red colors were $69.50 
per set or in five set lots $66.10. These 
are changed now to $72 and $70 respec- 
tively. Other colors than the above are 
quoted at $83.25 per set. For Chevrolet 
cars in black finish only the price has 
been advanced to $90 per set and for all 
other colors $96. Manley cranes selling 
before at $109.35 have been reduced to 
$97.20 each for the number 76 and for the 
No. 80 the revision is made to $144 from 
$157.23. Everway engine stands are in- 
creased from 52.43 to $54.90 and sta- 
tionary engine stands for Ford's are up 
from $25.74 to $27,90. 

Price Revisions Are 

Made on Car Springs 

Montreal. — 

CAR SPRINGS. — Revisions have been 
made in the price of front and rear 
springs used on Ford cars. No. 103 sell- 
"ing in single lots at $3.75 before is now 
$3.49; No. 106 is reduced from $10.50 to 
$9.30, this being the corresponding rear 
style. No. 3,800 style front springs are 
now advancecf to $3.49 from $3.11 and the 
rear style. No. 3,824, from $8.25 to $9.30 
each. These prices are net. 

Electric Bulbs Are 

Revised in Price 

Montreal. 

ELECTRIC BULBS.— Revisions are 
made in the prices of various 
electric bulbs used on automobiles. The 
changes record some advances in most in- 
stances but these are not uniform. The 
lines affected are many and both single 
and double contact styles are in the list so 
changed. 

Prospect Fewer Sheets 

Holds Prices Steady 

Montreal. 

SHEETS AND PLATES.— In view of 
the fact that there is more difficulty every 
day in getting forward supplies of sheets 
from the United States the prices here 
are holding steady. There still are sup- 
plies of a fair nature in certain gauges 
and for the most part trading is reported 
as quite active. A little change is made 
by one firm to slightly higher levels al- 
though the range is not materially af- 
fected. 

BLACK SHEETS — 100 Iba 

10 gauge $ $9 75 

12 gauge 9 25 9 65 

14 gauge 7 75 9 00 

16 gauge 7 85 9 15 

18-20 gauge 8 00 9 25 

22-24 gauge 8 00 9 60 

26 gauge s) 70 9 75 



28 gauge 9 90 

10% oz. (28 English) 10 80 10 75 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

10% oi $10 00 

28 ga S 00 

26 ga » Zi 

22 and 24 ga 9 u5 

20 ga 8 85 

18 ga 8 so 

1« ga 8 70 

Lead Waste and 

Common L,ead Pipe Up 

Montreal. 

LEAD PRODUCTS.— In view of the 
strong market that has been ruling for 
lead recently an advance is recorded this 
week in the prices of lead pipe. Both lead 
waste and ordinary lead pipe are higher 
by one cent per pound and firm at this. 
Lead sheets have not, as yet, been affected 
but this may occur at any time. Solder 
is steady and the volume of business for 
these line sis pretty small just now. 



NEW 


SCHEDULE OF PRICES ON 






WROUGHT IRON 


PIPE 






Price List No. 36 (July 


5, 


1918) 








Black Galvanized || 






Per 


100 feet 








Standard Buttweld 






Vs 


in. 


$ 6 


00 


$ 8 


00 


% 


m. 





22 


7 


35 


% 


m. 


5 


22 


7 


35 


1/, 


m. 


6 


63 


8 


20 


■!4 


in. 


8 


40 


10 


52 


1 


m. 


12 


41 


15 


56 


114 


in. 


16 


79 


21 


05 


I'A 


in. 


20 


08 


25 


16 


2 


in. 


27 


01 


33 


86 


21/i 


in. 


43 


29 


54 


11 


3 


m. 


56 


61 


70 


76 


31/. 


in. 


71 


76 


88 


78 


4 


in. 


85 


02 


105 


19 






Standard Lapweld 






2 


in. 


29 


97 


36 


45 


2V> 


in. 


45 


05 


55 


28 


3 


in. 


58 


91 


72 


29 


3V- 


in. 


73 


60 


91 


54 


4 


m. 


87 


20 


108 


45 


iVi 


in. 


99 


06 


123 


82 


5 


in. 


115 


40 


144 


30 


6. 


in. 


149 


80 


187 


20 


7 


in. 


195 


20 


243 


95 


8L 


in. 


205 


00 


256 


25 


8 


in. 


236 


20 


295 


20 


9 


in. 


282 


90 


353 


25 


10 L 


in. 


262 


40 


328 


00 


10 


in. 


337 


80 


422 


30 


Terms 


2% 30 days, approved 


credit. 




Freight 


equalized on Chatham 


Guelph, II 


Hamilton, London, Montreal, 


Toronto 








Welland. 









Lead pipe, lb 15 

Lead waste pipe, lb 16 

Lead traps and benda Net list 

Lead wool lb 14 

Lead sheets, 2i/i lb. sq, ft., lb 14 

Lead sheets, 3 to 31/2 lbs. sq. ft., lb 13% 

Lead sheets, 4 to 8 lbs. sq. ft., lb I3 

Cut sheeta, %e lb. extra, and cut sheets to size, 
le lb. extra. 

Solder (guaranteed) 56% 65 

Solder, strictly, lb 52% 60 

Solder, commercial, lb 48 55 

Solder, wiping, lb 51% 55 

Solder, wire (8 gauge) — 

40-60 62% 

4.5-55 68',i 

Zinc sheets, casks , . . . 

Do., broken lots 

Steel Bars and Bar 

Iron Hold Unchanged 

Montreal. 

BAR IRON AND STEEL.— Some little 
difficulty is experienced these days in get- 
ting all the trade requirements filled for 
the various sizes of steel and iron bars. 
At the same time there is no great com- 



plaint in this direction and a fair stock 
of standard sizes is held. Trading is not 
overly active and while prices are fully 
maintained some think these will not be 
ultered materially just now. 

Common bar iron, per 100 lbs J 4 BB 

Refined iron, per 100 lbs * 80 

Horseshoe iron, per 100 lbs * 80 

Norway iron ^2 00 

Mild steel » Jf 

Band steel » "? 

Sleigh shoe steel J 0» 

Tire steel ° *° 

Toe calk steel, per 100 lbs » 9o 

Mining tool steel, per lb 17%-0 1» 

Black Diamond tool steel, per lb 18 -0 is 

Spring steel \ " 

Single reeled machinery steel 6 ou 

Iron finish machinery steel | 10 

Harrow tooth steel • • «, 5 „? 

Black Diamond cast steel, lb 6 20-0 21 

Firm Prices For 

Wire Nails Prevail 

Montreal. 

WIRE AND NAILS.— There is some 
talk of wire nails reaching a higher price 
basis. There is not any too great a supply 
here and at the same time the country and 
city orders are filled reasonably well, 
those from the rural trade being larger 
than from the city. Standard wire nails 
are based still at $5.35; cut nails at $5.60 
and smooth steel wire at $6.25 per 100 lbs. 

Better Prices Now 

For Brass, Lead, Iron 

Montreal. 

OLD MATERIAL.— The market shows 
more activity than it has for some time 
and it would appear that the reason for 
this is a desire to pick up metals that are 
hard to get from the producers in the 
States and here. As a consequence heavy 
lead is in better demand and also heavy 
brass, copper, heavy machinery cast, 
heavy melting steel and stove plate. The 
new copper price basis has had its effect 
on the price of the scrap material and 
there is none too much of this around at 
present. The market is better than it has 
been for some little time. Zinc is on a 
higher basis as given below. 

Tea lead »««;/- 

Heavy lead pipe A";;,, a i i 

Yellow brass 15^ 14 

Red brass 23% 24 

Light brass •••• » ^» 

Scrap zinc 06 06 k. 

Heavy copper • • ■ '* ^4% ^4% 

Wrought iron. No. 1. per gr. ton .... 27 00 

No. 1 machinery csst 38 00 40 00 

Heavy melting steel 22 00 23 00 

Pipe scrap 18 00 20 00 

Stove plate, per ton 26 00 28 00 

No. 2 busheling 1» 00 14 00 

Old rubbers, boots and shoes OSVi u us /*j 

Overshoes, lumbermen's rubbers 

Bicycl: ti;es •::::::::::: : : : : : : o Sly. oos 

Automobile tires 05 OSV* 

Fuel Oil and Also 

Refined Oils Steady 

Montreal. 

REFINED OIL, GASOLINE, FUEL 
OIL.— The market for fuel oils is steady 
and with a production that is up to that 
of a year ago, if not somewhat better, there 
is ample stock to meet the needs of the 
trade. Prices are steady and likely to hold 
on the present basis. Coal oil is unchang- 
ed but steady and the price for Royalite 
is still 19c and that for Electroline and 
Palacine is 22c. Gasoline is in good de- 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



49 



mand with motor grade holding at 34c 
per gallon. 

Rope is Unchanged 

But Soft Fibres High 

Montreal. 

ROPE AND CORDAGE.— There is still 
much firmness in the market for soft 
fibres. Advances have been the order dur- 
ing the past ten days with a result that all 
jute goods such as twines and packings 
are now on a high basis. Advances have 
ranged from 4c to 7c per pound. The 
situation on sisal and manila rope is 
without new feature and some business is 
being transacted. Sisal is based at 27 %c 
per lb.; British manila at 38c and pure 
manila at 39c. 

Stoves, Ranges, Wares 

All Steady But Firm 

Montreal. 

STOVES AND WARES.— The summer 
trade for shelf goods such as various lines 
of tin and enamelled ware is all that can 
be expected and manufacturers have no 
complaint to make. It is a fact that all 
lines are firm and with the outlook for 
material uncertain there would seem to 
be no advantage in withholding from buy- 
ing such goods as will be wanted. Occa- 
sional shipments of material come in to 
manufacturers but of course it is harder 
to get these now. Stoves are steady and 
firm and the outlook is not promising as it 
was. They are likely to be high this fall. 

Lead and Tin Strong 
With Ingot Trade 



for this is small and with no change of 
consequence, prices quoted here are 15c- 
16c per pound. 

ALUMINUM.— Aside from the diffi- 



culty of getting supplies forward from 
the States there is nothing to report. 
Little trading is done and price holds at 
50 %c per pound. 



Fair 



Montreal. 

INGOT METALS.— The features of the 
week are those of firming prices for pig 
lead and also for tin, although tin is not 
changed as yet, locally. Trading is re- 
ported to be seasonably fair. 

COPPER.— Things have settled down 
to the new basis of prices. There is not 
a great deal of supply on spot here and in 
view of the consumption on this continent 
and bearing in mind the fact that the War 
Trade Board's price only holds till August 
5, it is expected that the price will hold 
very firm. This is from 31 to 32c pound. 

TIN. — Although there is some tin here 
and a few lots being received from week 
to week the position is one of strength. 
The advices from Singapore show that 
high prices are being asked and sales will 
not be made excepting the quotations are 
agreed to. Some think here that prices 
will be higher. In the meantime quota- 
tions range from $1.10 to $1.25 per pound. 

SPELTER.— Ever since the flurry in 
which this figured as a moving commodity 
there has been more quietness to the 
market than usual. Producers are well 
sold up, it is stated and the tone is firm 
here at 10% to lie per pound. 

LEAD. — Advances were made in the 
United States market and for prompt de- 
livery it is difficult to get supplies. It 
looko like a continued firm market and 
quot,;tions here are based around 10%c to 
Jlc per pound. 

ANTIMONY.— The amount of request 



TORONTO MARKETS 



TORONTO, July 11.— Many ad- 
vances are to be noted in prices 
during the v-fcek. At ■ iij, t.'ie Lnes 
to change are to be noted wrought iron 
pipe, pipe fittings, valves, blow torches, 
fire pots, thresher endless belts and semi- 
rotary iving pumps, all of which have 
undergone revision upward. Metallic 
cartridges and loaded shells are also on 
the upward trend as well as hemp twines 
which have soared tremendously durin^r 
the past month. New prices are ex- 
pected out OP. tackle blocks, which will 
provide for an advance of about 10 
per cent. Business generally is consid- 
ered very fair. 

Wing Pumps Higher; 

Barn Door Latches Up 

Toronto. 

WING PUMPS, BARN DORR 
LATCHES. — Prices issued on semi-rot- 
ary wing pumps show an upward trend, 
the figures named for these ranging for 
the No. 1 at $6.35, No. 2 at $7.00, No. 3 
at $8.50 and No. 4 at $9.75 each. 

Barn door latches have also been re- 
vised, the quotations now ruling on No. 
5 being $2.75 and on No. 9 being $5.10 
dozen. Rising manufacturing costs have 
been factgrs in both these advances. 

Torches Up 1-1/2%', 

Tie Out Chains Revised 



Toronto. 

TORCHES, TIE OUT CHAINS.— Fur- 
ther advances have become effective on 
Clayton & Lambert blow torches and 
plumbers' fire pots, the new prices being 
up about 7V3 per cent. Quotations nam- 
ed on some of the more familiar numbers 
of each are reproduced herewith: 

Torches^No. 31, $8.50; No. 32, $8.95; 
No. 50, $7.60; No. 37, $7.60 each; fire 
pots— No. 71. $15.25; No. 72, $13.90 each. 

A revised discount has been issued en 
tie out chains of 45-5 per cent., as against 
50 per cent, forme'ly ruling. This pro- 
vides for a slight advance. 

Pipe Taps Change; 

Carpenters' Chalk 

Toronto. 

PIPE TAPS, CHALK, CRAYONS.— 
A discount of 60 per cent, on V» to 1-inch 
and 50 and 5 per cent, on 1^/4 to 2-inch 
pipe taps has been established, which 
means a higher scale of prices for this 
line. Lists on some of the smaller sizes 
are: Vi-inch, $1.20; %-inch, $1.60; V2- 
inch, $2.00; %-inch, $2 80; 1-inch, $4.40 
each, to which the discount of 60 per 
cent, applies. 

Carpenters' chalk, white, is now being 
quoted at $1.40 and red and blue at $1.60 
per gross. School crayons, white at 2Sj 
and yellow at 30c gross, have also joined 
the list of goods advancing. 



Barn Door Hangers, 

Siveeping Compound Up 

Toronto. 

BARN DOOR HANGERS, SWEEP- 
ING COMPOUND.— A further advance 
in prices on barn door hangers is to be 
noted in revised quotations given here- 
with. Increased cost of materials with 
difficulty procuring, added to continually 
increasing manufacturing expense are 
factors to be considered in revised fig- 
ures. The Atlas No. is now being 
quoted at $13.30, No. 1 at $13.80 and 
No. 2 at $15.80 dozen pairs; Stearns 4- 
in. at $9.75 and 5-in. at $13.20 dozen 
pairs; Storm King, $10.60 dozen pairs. 

Dustbane sweeping compound has. 
been priced at higher levels as follows: 
250-pound barrel, $9.75; 150-pound bar- 
rel, $6.75; 75-pound keg, $3.75; 371/2- 
pound keg, $2.25; crates, 3-dozen tins,, 
$3.76 crate. 

Thresher Belts Higher; 
Tackle Blocks to Go Up 

Toronto. 

ENDLESS THRESHER BELTS, 
TACKLE BLOCKS.— New figures issued 
on Maple Leaf endless thresher belts, 
60 feet and longer, reveal prices consid- 
erably higher than those previously rul- 
ing. Present scale of quotations is on a 
comparatively high level as will be noted 
by following: 6-inch x 4-ply, 51c; 7-inch 
X 4-ply, 59c; 7-inch x 5-ply, 75c; 8-inch 
X 4-ply, 68c; 8-inch x 5-ply, 85c per foot. 

Prices on tackle blocks, are under revi- 
sion and new figures providing for an 
advance of about 10 per cent, will, it is 
expected, be forthcoming within a few 
days. 

Pipe Fittings Make 

Substantial Gain 



Toronto. 

PIPE FITTINGS.- Pipe fittings are 
again under revision during the week and 
higher prices have been named through- 
out on malleable and cast. Cast fittings 
are now being quoted at net lists; mal- 
leable and cast bushings at 15-18 per 
cent.; unions at 30 per cent., plugs at 
10-15 per cent.; malleable fittings, pound 
goods, class A black, 60c; class B black, 
27-28c; class C black, 18-19c; class A 
sralvanized, 75c; class B galvanized, 37- 
39c; class C galvanized, 27-28c per 
pound. 

Valves, Compression Bibs 
and Cocks Under Revision 

Toronto. 

VALVES, COMPRESSION BIBBS, 
COCKS. — Discounts on valves, compres- 
sion bibbs, stop and waste cocks, and 
basin and bath cocks have been revised 
to provide for a substantial advance. 
Th's c^^ange has been under conjidera- 



50 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



tion for some time and will not come as 
any great surprise. The present scale 
of discounts ranges as follows: 

VALVES Discount 

Ground work 42 

Compression work, standard 47 

High grade 41 

Cushion work 40 

Fuller work, standard 45 

High grade 38 

Basin cocks. No. standard 40 

High grade 40 

Bath cocks 50 

Flatway stop and waste cock, standard.. 50 ■ 

High grade 47 

Roundway stop and waste cocks, standard 50 

High grade 47 

Brass steam cocks, standard 10% advance on list 
Radiator valves, standard 10 

High grade Net list 

Patent quick opening valves 30 

Globe, angle and check valves, standard. .Net list 

Do., Jenkins Disc 5% advance on list 

Gasoline Holds Steady; 

Lubricating Otis Up 

OILS, GASOLINE.— An undiminished 
demand for gasoline continues to be 
manifest and the greatest difficulty is in 
getting tank cars through to destination. 
Railways are loaded with other freight 
and working with smaller amount of help 
so side track empty tank cars as long as 
possible instead of moving them to dis- 
tributing centres. Coal oil is in good 
demand also, and prices hold firm at 18c 
to 21c per gallon according to grade. 
Gasoline remains unchanged at 33c. 

Some lines of lubricating oil are under 
revision, having recorded advances, but 
new prices were not available at time 
of going to press. 

Twine Makes Further 

Advance; Packing Too 

T*r*iito. 

ROPE, TWINE. — Jute and hemp 
wrapping twines are becoming increas- 
ingly scarce and high in price. Unfin- 
ished hemp has gone up about 4c per 
pound and finished from 4c to 7c per 
pound during the week. Substitution on 
these lines seems to be the order of the 
clay and indications are that one has to 
take what is supplied and be thankful 
to get it. 

Jute fine yarn packings, tarred or 
untarred, is up 5c per pound to 20c and 
jute coarse sewer up 3c per pound to 
15c per pound during the week. This is 
an indication of how jute products affc 
climbing. 

Binder twine is moving, though the 
bulk of this business has been taken care 
of by the manufacturers. There have 
been no new developments in rope, a fair 
amount for hay forks going forward with 
demand on other sizes light. 

Prices on Manila rope hold unchanged 
at 39c basis, with British Manila and 
New Zealand hemp at 33c. Sisal rope 
is quoted at 27i^c pound base. 

W^'ire and Nails 

Hold Unchanged 

Toronto. 

WIRE NAILS. — There have been no 
new developments in the nail situation 
during the week. The market is very 
firm and in some quarters higher levels 
are looked for. The base price on wire 
nails remains at $5.30 and cut nails at 
$5.65 per 100 pounds. 



Galvanized wire holds at advances re- 
corded last week, but no change has been 
made in smooth steel wire, the base on 
which remains at $6.25 per 10,0 pounds. 

Bar Iron Unchanged; 

A Fair Movement 



Toronto. 

IRON AND STEEL.— An unchanged 
market prevails on iron and steel bars 
and conditions generally are the same 
as those prevailing for several weeks 
past. Supplies in jobbers' hands are fair 
and a fair amount of trading is being 
transacted. The range of quotations 
follows: 

TORONTO— Per 100 lbs. 

$ 5 25 
5 50 
5 65 
5 75 
5 50 



Common bar iron 
Common bar steel 

Refined iron 

Angle base 

Horseshoe iron . . . . , 



Tool Manufacturers 

Announce Plainer Styles 

Some of the manufacturers are an- 
nouncing to the trade at present that 
th-^y will a'most immediately make such 
changes as they deem essential to con- 
serve labor and power. This will apply 
to \ar(u.^ lines of hardware. In iub- 
stance the lines that will be affected as 
made Ly one of the largest tool com- 
panies in the United States nro as fol- 
lows ; 

Braces. — These will carry a rough 
nickel-plated finish, and the practice of 
"buffing" these will be largely elimin- 
ated. The handles that have usually 
been made of material such as cocobolo 
will be replaced by stained hardwood. 

Planes. — The irons of these will be 
ground, but in many instances they will 
not be polished. As in the case of braces 
the wood used on these knobs and 
handles will be supplied of stained 
hardwood. 

Screwdrivers. — These to a very large 
extent will not be ground or polished 
excepting at the tips, but will carry the 
natural finish of the steel. 

General. — Tools made of wood, for the 
most part, will be supplied the trade in 
a less highly finished state. Other lines 
will also be affected by proposed 
changes. 



Tire steel 5 70 

Mild steel 5 50 

Norway iron 11 00 13 00 

Toe caulk steel 6 25 

Sleigh shoe steel 5 50 

Band steel. No. 10 5 75 

Do., No, 12 6 00 

Spring steel 9 50 11 50 

Mining drill steel 19 00 30 00 

Sheet cast steel 42 45 

Tool steel 20 42 

No New Developments 

In Corrugated Sheets 

Toronto. 

CORRUGATED SHEETS, EAVET- 
TROUGH.— There have been no further 
developments of particularly interesting 
nature in corrugated sheets, siding, ceil- 
ing or shingles during the week and the 
trade generally has accepted the new 



scale of quotations recently ^put through 
with no comment. A fair amount of 
business is being handled and the same 
might be said of eavetrough and conduc- 
tor pipe. Prices on corrugated sheets 
follow. Eavetrough and conductor pipe 
prices appear in current market quota- 
tions : 

TORONTO— Pfr 100 Sq. Feet 

Corrugated Sheets— Gal'zed Painted 

No. 2« gauge $ 9 00 $ 7 50 

No. 26 gauge 10 00 8 5» 

No. 24 gauge 15 00 11 25 

No. 22 gauge 18 00 14 00 

No 20 gauge 21 00 17 50 

No. 18 gauge 27 00 21 00 

Discount, 7Vi per cent. 

Sheets Moving Freely; 

Plates Grow Scarce 

Toronto. 

SHEETS, PLATES.— A splendid trade 
on sheets and plates is reported and in 
some quarters a decided scarcity of 10- 
gauge and heavier has developed. Pres- 
ent restrictions preclude the possibility 
of renewing stocks for some time to 
come and stocks generally must continue 
to dwindle though very good supplies are 
said to be available in some quarters. 
Prices hold unchanged at following fig- 
ures: 
BLACK SHEETS— Per 100 Iba. 

10 gauge 10 00 $12 00 

12 gauge 10 10 10 00 

14 gauge 7 45 7 90 8 40 

16 gauge 7 50 8 00 8 50 

18-20 gauge 7 80 7 55 8 05 

22-24 gauge 7 85 7 60 8 19 

26 gauge 7 90 7 66 8 15 

28 gauge 8 00 7 75 8 25 

3/16-inch plate 10 10 10 25 

^4-inch boiler plate . 10 00 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

10% oz 9 50 9 75 

U.S. 28 9 20 9 45 

U.S. 26 8 90 9 15 

22 and 24 8 75 9 00 

18 and 20 8 60 8 86 

16 8 45 8 70 

14 . 8 35 8 6» 

Wrought Iron Pipe 

Makes Advance; Tubes 

Toronto. 

WROUGHT IRON PIPE, BOILEU 
TUBES. — A slight advance in the sched- 
ule of prices obtaining on wrought iron 
pipe has been made during the week and 
is shown in panel elsewhere in this issue. 
This would seem to be warranted under 
conditions prevailing now regarding sup- 
plies of skelp and difficulty in securing 
for manufacturing purposes. 

There are some boiler tubes in transit 
but time of arrival is not even hinted at. 
These will afford some relief, it is 
thought, but will by no means overcome 
present shortage. Prices are unchanged 
as follows: 

Boiler Tubes — Cold Drawn Lapweld 

1 inch $86 00 $ 

H4 inch 40 00 

11/2 inch 43 00 36 00 

1% inch 43 00 36 00 

2 inch 60 00 36 09 

214 inch S3 00 38 50 

2y2 inch 55 00 42 00 

3 inch 64 00 50 00 

3% inch 68 00 

3^ inch 77 00 60 00 

4 inch 90 00 75 00 

folder Somewhat Faster; 
Lead Pipe Holds Firm 

Toronto. 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS.— A 
readjustment of values on solder has 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



51 



been made which has resulted in a some- 
what lower scale of prices being arrivea 
at. Guaranteed at 60c, strictly at 55 V^- 
56c, commercial at 51-52c, and wiping at 
55c per pound are the range of quotations 
now being named. Wire solder prices 
range from 70 to 80c per pound. Manu- 
factured lead products hold firm and un 
changed at advance recorded last week. 
The present range of quotations follow: 

Lead pipe, lb 15 .... 

Lead waste pipe, lb 16 .... 

Lead traps and bends Net list 

Lead wool, lb 151/2 16 

Lead sheets, 3 to 31^ lbs. sq. ft., lb li'A 

Lead sheets, 4 to 8 lbs. sq. ft 121/2 13 

Cut sheets, %c lb. extra, and cut shc:eu> to size. 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 60 

Solder, strictly, lb 5.5i/> 60 

Solder, commercial, lb 51 52 

Solder, wiping, lb 55 

Solder, wire, lb 70 80 

Zinc sheets, per lb 26 

Nothing New in 

Old Materials 

Toronto. 

OLD MATERIALS.— There have been 
no new developments in the old material 
situation during the week, prices holding 
firm and unchanged and the demand be- 
ing along rather narrow lines. Quota- 
tions are given herewith: 

Tea lead $0 05% 

Heavy lead pipe 07% 07% 

Yellow brass 12 13 

Red brass 21 

Light brass 091/4 

Heavy zinc 05 1/2 06 

Heavy copper 21 1/2 22 

Stove plate, per ton 17 00 18 00 

Old cast iron, per ton 25 00 26 00 

Overshoes, trimmed Arctics 06 1/2 

Auto tires 04% 

Bicycle tires 0031/2 

Per gross ton. 

No. 1 railroad wrought 26 00 27 00 

No. 2 railroad wrought 15 00 16 00 

Pipes and flues 12 00 

No. 1 busheling 16 00 17 00 

No. 2 busheling 12 00 

Country mixed scrap 16 00 

Tin Still Scarce; 

Lead, Spelter Firm 

Toronto. • 

INGOT METALS.— A shipment of tin 
has reached the local market but has 
been absorbed and a very large propor- 
tion of tin to arrive is sold, and the time 
of arrival uncertain. Lead holds firm 
and spelter is also strong though in quiet 
demand. Antimony has stiffened an- 
other 2c in some quarters. 

COPPER.— The advanced price of 
copper in the United States has been re- 
flected here, quotations locally ranging 
from 30c to 32c per pound. This metal 
is reported very scarce locally, little 
coming through from the south other 
than for war orders. 

TIN. — This metal is still scarce and 
supplies difficult to procure. Somei has 
arrived but was quickly absorbed and 
the bulk of this metal to arrive is sold. 
Quotations show a wide range from 
$1.15 to $1.35 per pound and even $1.50 
has been offered. 

SPELTER.— The demand is quiet at 
the present time but the market holds 
firmly. Price locally is unchanged at 
lOi/^c to lie per pound. 

LEAD. — There is some movement of 
lead but this market is not extremely 
active. Prices are very firm at primary 
points and this is reflected here. Quo- 



tations range around 10 %c to lie per 
pound. 

ALUMINUM.— Little interest centres 
in this metal commercially. Government 
requirements largely absorbing-' avail- 
able supplies. Quotations are made at 
50c per pound. 

ANTIMONY. — Further strength is 
noticeable under influence of a heavier 
demand for this metal and prices have 



advanced another 2c per pound. The 
range of prices locally is from 18c to 20c 
per pound. 

PIG IRON. — Commercially there is 
little new to report with regard to pig 
iron. War demands are absorbing the 
entire output and as long as these con- 
ditions exist little may be expected for 
commercial purposes. Prices remain un- 
changed. 



LONDON MARKETS 



LONDON, July 11. — Prices are very 
firm wi;h the usual budget of ad- 
vances which includes coping saws, 
step and extension ladders, horse shoes, 
wood and felt weather strip, hose noz- 
zles, stock and poultry specific, wood 
tubs, rosin, shellac, turpentine and lin- 
seed oil. 

Business in London continues good. 
Surrounding districts also report a fair 
volume of trade. 

Merchants here have enjoyed real 
good business so far this year and con- 
ditions at present warrant them ex- 
pecting it to continue good the balance 
of the year. 

Stocks of good selling summer lines 
are low. Factories are still slow in de- 
livering many lines. 

Collections continue good. 

Horse Shoes Reach 

igher Levels 



High 



London. • 

HORSE SHOES.— Revised quotations 
have been put into effect here on horse 
shoes. The new prices represent an ad- 
vance,, the first change to be recorded 
for some months, and is said to be 
warranted under existing conditions. 
Present scale of quotations is as follows: 
Light iron, No. 2 and larger $6.75 per 
100 lbs., No. 1 and smaller $7.00 per 
100 lbs. X L Steel, No. 2 and larger 
$7.20 per 100 lbs.. No. 1 and smaller 
$7.45 per 100 lbs. 

Fair Demand For Nails; 

Rope Moving Well 

London. 

NAILS, ROPE.— A very fair demand 
is in evidence for nails at the present 
time which would indicate some build- 
ing activity. No price change is to be 
noted this week, wire selling at $5.30 
and cut at $5.60 base per 100 lbs. 

Indications point to a good sale of 
rope at present and prices hold 
firm and unchanged as follows: Pure 
manila, 39c base per lb.; British man- 
ila, 33c base per lb.; New Zealand hemp, 
33c base per lb.; sisal, 27%c base per 
lb. 

Step and Extension 
Ladders Revised Upward 

London. 

STEP AND EXTENSION LADDERS. 
— Continually mounting costs of wood 



have been an influence in recent ad- 
vances on ladders and again enters into 
revisions listed during the week on both 
step and extension. There has been 
some difficulty in getting the large ex- 
tension, 34 ft. and longer, experienced. 
New prices adopted in this week's 
change are: Step ladders, shelf lock, 
21c ft. Ontario, 26c ft. Extension lad- 
ders up to 34 ft., 23c ft.; 36 to 40 ft., 
26c ft. 

> 

50c Advance in Hose 
Nozzles; Coping Saws up 

London. 



HOSE NOZZLES, COPING SAWS.— 
A 50c advance in the price of the Gem 
hose nozzles has been made to bring 
quotations up to a level of $6.50 per 
dozen. 

A change has also been made in Jones 
coping saws, prices bring revised up- 
ward. This it is intimated is justified 
under present conditions and is the only 
change recorded for some months past. 
No. 1 is selling at $19.00 and No. 2 
at $11.50 per dozen. 

Wood Tubs Again 

Show Upward Trend 

London. 

WOOD TUBS.— Another increase in 
the price of wood tubs has been put 
into effect during the week, prices now 
reaching a decidedly high level. The 
present advance is a substantial one on 
a couple of the larger sizes, though not 
so great on the smaller ones. Quota- 
tions here are now being made as fol- 
lows: No. 0, $23.50 dozen. No. 1, $21.50 
dozen. No. 2, $15.40 dozen. No 3, 
$15.00 dozen. 

Weatherstrip Prices 

ler For Fall 



Highi 



London. 

WEATHER STRIP.— New prices just 
issued on wood and felt weather strip 
for fall delivery reveal higher prices 
than those previously ruling. This ad- 
vance is in line with general trend of 
items which enter into the manufacture 
of these two articles and which have to 
be manufactured. Lists now adopted 
are given as follows, being subject to 
a discount of 60 per cent.: No. 60, 5c 
ft. No. 61, 5c ft. No. 611/2, 7c ft. No. 
64, 10c ft. 



52 



7/^% Advance in Stock 

and Poultry Specific 

London. 

STOCK AND POULTRY SPECIFIC. 
— An advance has been put into effect on 
Royal Purple stock and poultry specific 
amounting to approximately 7% per 
cent. Prices ruling for the various sizes 
are given herewith: 30c size, $2.40 dozen 
60c size retail, $4.80 dozen. $1.75 size 
retail, $15.00 dozen. $6.00 size retail, 
$57.00 dozen. 

Orange and White Shellac 
25c Gallon Higher 

London. 

ORANGE, WHITE SHELLAC— A 
25c per gallon advance in orange and 
w^hite shellac is provided for in new 
quotations issued this week, bringing 
figures to a fairly high level. The pre- 
sent scale of quotations is given as fol- 
lows: Orange, 1 gals., $4.50 gal.; % 
gals., $4.65 gal,; % gals., $4.80 gal. 
White, 1 gals., $4.75 gal.; Vz gals., 
-$4.90 gal.; ^ gals., $5.05 gal. 

Rosin Goes Higher; Paris 
Green Stocks Low 

Xondon. - — - — 

BOSIN, PARIS GREEN.— Higher 
prices have been named on rosin, full 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

casks bring quoted at $5.90 per 100 
pounds and small lots selling at 6i^c per 
pound. 

A good sale of Paris green is mani- 
fest and stocks locally are very low. 
No change in price is noted in following 
quotations: %lb. pkgs. 66V^c lb.; 1 
lb. pkgs., 64 1/2 c lb.; 25 lb. drums, 621/2 c 
Ibr,; 50 lb. drums, 61 1/2 c lb.; 100 lb. 
drums, 61 %c lb. 

Dry Paris green blowers are also sell- 
ing well at the unchanged price of $9.00 
dozen. 

Linseed Oil Up 7c 

Turpentine Up 3c 

London. 

LINSEED OIL, TURPENTINE.— An 
advance of 7c per gallon in prices of 
linseed oil have become effective during 
the week and the position generally in 
this market is one of decided strength. 
Fair supplies are available and orders 
are going forward on the following basis 
of prices: 1 to 2 bbls., raw, $1.97 per 
gal., boiled, $2.00; 3 to 5 bbls., raw, $1.96 
per gal., boiled, $1.99; 6 to 9 gals., raw, 
$1.94 per gal., boiled, $1.97. Less bbls 
add 10c per gal. Turpentine remains 
very firm and another advance of 3c per 
gallon has been put into effect, making 
to-day's price in 1 barrel lots $1.03 per 
gal., 2 to 4 barrel lots $1.02, and 5 gallon 
lots $1.13. 



WINNIPEG MARKETS 



WINNIPEG, July 11.— Business for 
the week is again reported as 
normal in most sections while a 
few are withholding orders due to lack 
of sufficient rain to assure a good crop. 
Markets for the week again show numer- 
ous advances and include such lines as 
wrenches, harness rings, lace leather, 
white lead, Canada plate, conductor pipe, 
eave trough, conductor pipe elbows, 
Penberthy valves, oil cups, wash boards 
and washing machines. Many other 
lines show a very firm market due to the 
most extreme difficulties encountered by 
manufacturers in getting the necessary 
supplies of raw material. 

Lace Leather Jumps 

IOC a Pound 

Winnipeg. 

LACE LEATHER.— A further ad- 
vance of 10c per pound is reported on 
raw hide and oak tanned lace leather, 
both in side and cut laces, due to the ex- 
cessive demand for all lines of leather 
goods and the extreme shortage of skill- 
ed labor in production. New prices now 
in effect are given herewith: Oak tanned 
sides $1.65; cut laces $1.85 per pound; 
raw hide sides $1.60; cut laces $1.80 per 
pound. 

New Prices Named on 

Eavetrough, Cond. Pipe 

Winnipeg. 

EAVETROUGH, CONDUCTOR PIPE. 
■ — ^Recent advances in galvanized sheets 
are now being reflected in the manufac- 



tured lines such as eavetrough, conductor 
pipe and elbows, which this week regis- 
ter an advance of 5 per cent, over for- 
mer prices. To-day's quotations are 
based as follows: 

Eavetrough, O.G.— 8 in., $6.85; 10 in., $7.60; 
12 in., $8.95 ; 15 in.. $12.25 per 100 ft. 

Conductor Pipe— 2 in., $8 ; 3 in., $9.65 ; 4 in., 
$12.75 ; 5 in., $17.30 per 100 ft. 

Conductor Pipe Elbows, Plain or Corrugated — 
2 in., $1.90; 3 in., $2.20; 4 in., $3.55; 5 in., $8.80 
doz. 

Rain Water Cut-offs— 3 in., 62c ; 4 in., 76c each. 

$1.00 Advance Made 

on Canada Plate 

Winnipeg. 



CANADA PLATE.— Higher freight 
rates and the extreme shortage in Can- 
ada plate has been the means of further 
strengthening the market and prices 
move up $1 per box making to-day's 
selling as follows: Half polished, 18 x 
21 in., $11.00; 18 x 24 in., $11.00; 20 x 
28 in., $11.00 per box; full polished, 18 
X 21 in., $12.50; 18 x 24 in., $12.50; 20 x 
28 in., $12.50 per box. 

Washing Machines go 

to Higher Levels 

Winnipeg. 

WASHING MACHINES.— A further 
advance has been recorded during the 
week on washing machines due to the 
heavy advance in freight rates in the 
United States as practically all the wood 
used in their manufacture is Louisiana 
swamp cypress. At present, according 
to reports, only a limited amount is ob- 
tainable. Present prices on a few of the 



July 13, 1918 

lines are as follows: "Dowswell," $5.65; 
"New Century B," $11.65; "New Idea," 
$13.00; "Snowball," $9.75; "Playtime," 
$12.75 each. 

Sharp Advance Made 

in Washboards 

Winnipeg. 

WASH BOARDS.— The week's mar- 
ket shows one of the heaviest advances 
made during the war covering wash 
boards. This is said to be due to the 
difficulty of securing materials and the 
the high costs of manufacturing. New 
prices now ruling are as follows: Globe 
tin face, $3.50; enamel, $6.50; glass, 
$5.75; brass, $7.25 per dozen. 

Wrenches up 10% ; 

Harness Rings Revised 

Winnipeg. 

WRENCHES, HARNESS RINGS.— 
Prices on Bull Dog wrenches, after re- 
maining steady for the past few months, 
again show a small advance, moving up 
approximately 10 per cent. New ruling 
prices are as follows: No. 1, $1.60; No. 
11/2, $2.80; No. 1%, $5.10; No. 2, $6.60 
per dozen. A general revision in prices 
on harness rings has just gone into force, 
due to further increased manufacturing 
costs and they are quoted to-day at fol- 
lowing figures: Harness rings: % in., 
86c; % in., 93c; % in., $1.10; 1 in., $1.40, 
1% in., $1.80; IVa in., $2.45; 1% in., 
$2.75; 2 in., $3.00 per gross; X. C. % in., 
$1.40; 1 in., $1.70; 1% in., $2.05; Wz in., 
$3.05; 1% in., $3.40; 2 in., $4.10 per 
gross. 

Valves, Water Gauges, Oil 
Cups up 5 to 10% 

Winnipeg. 

VALVES, WATER GAUGES, OIL 
CUPS. — Prices on Penberthy valves, 
water gauges, oil cups, which have re- 
mained steady for the past year, show 
an advance during the week of from 5 
to 10 per cent, according to the class of 
goods affected, while many of their lines 
remain unchanged. Among the most 
prominent of the lines to advance appear 
the following with to-day's prevailing 
prices : 

Regrinding Valves, Globe and Angle — % in.. 
$1.21; % in., $1.38; Vi in., $1.76; % in., $2.42; 
1 in., $3.08; lA/l in., $4.40; IVa in., $6.05; 2 
in.. $9.65 each. 

Compodisk Valves, Globe and Angle — % in., 
$1.16; % in., $1.32; Vi in., $1.68; % in., $2.31; 
1 in., $2.94; 1% in., $4.20; 1% in.. $5.78; 2 in.. 
$9.20 each. 

Regrinding Swing Check Valves — % in., $1.56 ; 
% in., $1..56; V-i in., $1.65; % in., $2.20: 1 in.. 
$2.80: 1% in., $4.10 eaeh 

Water Gauges, Northwest — % in., $3.35 each ; 
No. 84A, $2 each. 

Oil Cups. Safety— No. 400, $1.30; No. 401, $1.50: 
No. 402, $1.70; No. 403, $2.15; No. 404, $2.55 each. 

Salute— No. 551, $1.15; No. 552, $1.25; No. 553. 
$1.30; No. 557, $3.25 each. 

Sultan— No. 652. $1.45 ; No. 6.53, $2.05 ; No. 654, 
.'R2.35 ; No. 655, $2.90 ; No. 656, $3.60 ; No 657, 
$4.70 each. 

Saturn— No. 950, 27c; No. 951, 36c; No. 952. 
46c ; No. 9.53, 60c each. 

White Lead Moves up 

$1.00 Hundred Pounds 

Winnipeg. 

WHITE LEAD.— The white lead mar- 
ket has been very firm lately with the 



JuJy 18, 1&18 



II A R D W A E E AND METAL 



gs 



result that prices have agairii advahcect' 
approximately $1 per 100 pounds, while 
shipments continue about normal. New 
prices now in effect are given herewith: 
Decorators' pure lead, ton lots, $17.75; 
less than ton lots $18.10 per 100 pounds; 
decorators' special lead, ton lots, $16.75; 
less than ton lots, $17.10 per 100 pounds. 

Linseed Oil Holds; 

Turpentine Unchanged 

Winnipeg. 

LINSEED OIL, TURPENTINE.— No 



change' 1^ recorded in the price of lin- 
seed oil during the past week, shipments 
being reported as normal. Prices now 
ruling are as follows: Raw $2.00; boiled 
$2.03 per gal. Turpentine prices still 
hold firm at recent advances with only 
a limited demand. Prices to-day are as 
follows: Bbls. $1.10 gal.; Va bbl. $1.13 
gal.; 5-gal. lots $1.15 gal.; 1-gal. lots 
$1.15, plus the usual extras for contain- 
ers. 



PITTSBURGH MARKETS 



PITTSBURGH, July 11.— Practically 
all the steel produced is still going 
out against Government orders or 
against the preference schedule of the 
more essential purposes for which steel 
should be used at this time. Any steel 
that might remain after the priorities 
and preferences were satisfied would be 
available for general distribution, but 
only under permission granted by the 
Directorate of Steel Supply. That there 
will be such a surplus eventually is com- 
monly believed, but not until the presen: 
rate of shipping steel to the war activi- 
ties causes them to call for a reduction 
in their quotas. The object of the pres- 
ent regulations is to cause stocks to ac- 
cumulate in connection with these acti- 
vities, particularly shipbuilding and sheli 
making. 

While the control of steel shipments 
is very rigid as to its general scope and 
purpose, there are increasing evidence^ 
that the War Industries Board does not 
intend to permit the industries that are 
not accorded any preferential treatment 
by the present regulations to suffer any 
unnecessary hardship. It is intimated 
that there will be relaxations from time 
to time to permit important business to 
go ahead provided it does not interfere 
with the main object of winning the 
war. The immediate reference is to 
manufacturing consumers, in the less es- 
sential industries, who have some stocks 
of steel on hand, but require some addi- 
tional sizes or descriptions of steel in 
order to utilize that on hand. 

Stocks of Steel 

The fact that steel has been decidedly 
scarce for nearly three years should not 
be taken as proof that there are no stocks 
in the hands of buyers at the present 
time, for as a matter of fact the reverse 
is the case in many instances if not in 
the majority. What has been called a 
"scarcity" of steel for more than two 
years has not been a famine, but rather 
a difficulty in securing prompt deliveries, 
and unusual delays in securing deliveries 
of some sizes or descriptions. The na- 
tural result of this condition has been 
to cause jobbers and manufacturing con- 
sumers, as a measure of protection, to 
seek to pile up stocks so that they would 
be safe from loss when there were delays. 
It was not so much a scarcity of steel 
for the immediate requirements of the 
buyers, but an inability to obtain as much 
as was desired. It is the testimony of 



an authority quite familiar with the posi 
tion of jobbers that in. the main they 
have to-day heavier stocks, in point of 
tonnage, than they had two years ago. 
and yet the jobbers have been urging the 
authorities to devise a system of prefer- 
ential treatment for them, particularly 
along the line of enabling them to re- 
place freely any steel that they sell for 
direct or indirect war purposes. Many 
cases are arising of manufacturing con- 
sumers who seek assurance of future 
supplies when it turns out that they have 
stocks to last them for some time still, 
frequently for a couple of months. By 
the time these buyers really need any 
considerable quantities of steel there may 
be a fair supply available for them, and 
as already indicated the Director of 
Steel Supply is likely to accord small 
tonnages of steel to those who already 
have a considerable tonnage, but need 
some extra steel in order to round out 
their stocks. In this connection the di- 
rector is naturally influenced by the fact 




ALEX. C. GIBB 

Son of Alexander Gibb, wholesale metals, 
etc., of Montreal, who is now with the 
Royal Navy as a first class warrant officer 
in the wireless department. Before en- 
listing, Mr. Gibb was associated with his 
father in the wholesale business conducted 
by him and through special studies ac- 
quired proficiency before joining the 
colors. 



that this will enable business to go on, 
keep money in circulation, and produce 
profits out of which taxes can be paid. 

Sales and Deliveries 

There is an interesting difference in the 
interpretation of the regulations by some 
of the producers. The majority of pro- 
ducers interpret the regulations as ap- 
plying to deliveries only, thus permitting 
sales to be made irrespective of the use 
to which the material would be put if 
delivered, there being of course no guar- 
antee when the sale is made as to when 
delivery will occur, if ever. Other manu- 
facturers insist that the regulations do 
not permit them to make sales except 
of material the delivery of which is pro- 
vided for by the regulations. As to de- 
liveries there is practically no difference 
of opinion, the regulations being quite 
well understood and being interpreted 
substantially alike by all interests. As a 
concrete illustration, the American Steel 
& Wire Company adheres to the policy 
announced in its recent circular, of 
accepting business freely from its 
regular customers for delivery when- 
ever this becomes feasible. Very 
nearly all, if not all, of the inde- 
pendent wire producers adhere to the 
policy of not accepting business from 
ordinary commercial buyers who are not. 
accorded any preference treatment in the 
matter of deliveries. They do not deny 
that matters may eventually so shape 
themselves that the deliveries will be pos- 
sible, but they maintain that when all 
mills are filled for about three months to 
come there is no use in booking addi- 
tional business at this time unless it is' 
of the kind that is accorded preferential 
treatment. 

More Tin Plate 

For the purpose of conserving sugar 
the Food Administration has issued an' 
order prohibiting the manufacture of 
condensed milk. Evaporated milk is not 
included as it does not involve the use 
of much if any sugar. There are large 
stocks of milk in existence and further" 
accumulation is quite unnecessary. This 
procedure will release a considerable 
quantity of tin plate. Another order has 
been issued affecting the supply of tin 
plate, restricting the packing of dried 
beans until September 15. The can 
manufacturers are not permitted to sup- 
ply cans to the industry until the date 
mentioned, and tin plate makers are not 
allowed to supply tin plate to the b'^an 
packers who make their cans. Special 
exceptions will be made .in case of lots 
of beans showing so much moisture that 
ihey might not keep. It is estimated 
roughly that the two orders will release, 
for other purposes, about a million boxes 
of tin plate in the next two months, and 
some of this may be available for in- 
creasing exports over the provisions al- 
ready made. The tin plate miil^ vixpect 
io produce regularly about three and a 
quarter million base boxes of tin plate 
a month during the remainder of the 
year, and this will bring the calendar 
year's output to fully 36,000,000 boxes. 
Arrangements were recently perfected, 
whereby each tin plate plant will be fully 
supplied with steel. ' 



54 



•July 13, IdlS 

illlllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHl 







illlilllllKl 



Cheap Paint is Dear Paint 

Length of Life is Perhaps Less Than Half That of Best Paints — Requires at That Rate 

Twice the Amount of Labor — Bjst Paints Retain Adhesiveness 

Longer Than Cheap Paints 



IT may seem somewhat of a paradox to 
say that "cheap paint is dear paint." But 
there are few hardwaremen who will 
not instantly comprehend the significance 
of the expression. Cheapness does not con- 
sist in initial cost. It is the length of ser- 
vice^ — the length of wear that is obtained 
from any article — that determines whether 
or not it has been a good investment. That 
is always the deciding factor that brings a 
customer back to the store again and again 
and makes of him or her a steady customer. 
It is the silken cord of attachment between 
customer and merchant whose force can- 
not be gainsaid. No matter what the per- 
sonal attachment of the customer may be 
to the merchant — it matters not what the 
friendship may be — if there is not good 
va'.ue in the article purchased that cus- 
tomer will surely slip away to the place 
where he can get better value. This is in- 
deed true in the instance of paint. It takes 
longer for the article to show up its merits 
than it does for the average purchase in a 
hardware store. But the purchase is 
usually of fairly good volume and for that 
reason if the customer is not satisfied with 
it at the end of one or two years he will 
not soon forget that fact. 

Why Cheap Paint is Dear 

Hardwaremen can do much to instill this 
idea of the dearness of cheap paint into 
their customers. Very many already do 
use the argument with effectiveness. It can 
be pointed out that a thing worth having is 
worth waiting for. 

If a house is worth painting it is worth 
painting right. It should be pointed out 
that never under any circumstances should 
a second quality paint be used on the home. 
If at the time it needs painting and you 
cannot afford the best paint made, wait 
until you can. 

The theory that a paint costing one dol- 
lar a gallon which will last three years is 



just as good as a paint costing two dollars 
a gallon and lasting six years is all wrong. 

In the first place the cost of application 
must be added to the paint in each instance, 
and in case of the cheaper paint it will 
have to be added twice. In the second 
place, a paint that has to be renewed in 
three years cannot possibly have the ma- 
terial in it that a paint will have that lasts 
six years. The six-year paint contains the 
best ingredients known as pigments, and 
the pigments are really the life of the paint. 
They are the part of the finished paint that 
protects the building and battles against 
time. 

Retains Adhesiveness a Long Time 

A six-year paint will be found at the end 
of that time to retain its adhesiveness to 
the building on which it was placed and 
an additional coating but doubles the thick- 
ness of pigment. As inferior quality paints 
lose much of their protecting properties 
and gradually wear off, by the time the 
building needs repainting there is not much 
of the original coating of pigment left. 

Paint of the highest quality, combined 
with the most extreme care and standard- 
ized beyond all chance of guesswork re- 
sults, should be used in preference to those 
that are cheaper. Inferior material being 
used in the composition of cheap liquid 
paints will not show up until long after the 
painter has gone, but in a year or two the 
cheaper paint will be an endless source of 
dissatisfaction. 

These are selling points in the paint 
trade which the dealer can make good use 
of. It is surprising the number of people 
who look upon paint as just paint. That is 
they consider that it is all the same so far 
as wearing qualities go. It is something to 
cover up the surface. They forget to look 
into the future for their value. It is here 
where the paint dealer can do some useful 
missionary work that should mean in- 
creased paint sales for his department. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



55 




Every can is full of 
Quality and Customer 
Satisfaction 



Dealers selling Moore's House Colors are 
well aware of the unstinted satisfaction they al- 
ways give the customer. The high quality and 
splendid covering capacity of "Moore's" are 
factors in the making of better paint sales 
worthy of every dealer's consideration. 
"Moore" profits are worth while. 



Benjamin Moore & Co., Ltd., West Toronto 




A Double Guarantee 

''Reliable'' 

and 

"Warranted Pure" 

Linseed Oil 



The Canada Linseed Oil Mills, 

LIMITED 

M0NTRE4L and TORONTO 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



56 



?iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iii!iii:i;i;iiiii!iiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiii;i!i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir^ 



July 13, 1918 









WEEKLY PAINT MARKETS 



MONTREAL 

MONTREAL, July 11.— The sharp 
advance in the price of linseed 
oil holds the prime position of 
interest in this week's paint market. 
Flaxseed from the Argentine has been 
placed on the embargo list, and while 
shipments on the way will be alolwed in, 
the large use of oil on the other side of 
the border will quickly absorb this. No 
turpentine is to hand yet and those who 
looked for relief ere this have had to 
admit that they can forecast nothing at 
present. Putty is one of the firmest items 
on the list and an advance will not come 
as a surprise. White lead in oil and 
mixed paint are both firm and steady. 
The demand from the retail trade for 
insecticides has been heavy this year, 
while the supply to meet this has not, m 
all cases been ample to meet the require- 
ments. 

For Trade Demands 

No Turpentine Offered 

Montreal. 

TURPENTINE.— Although there is 
some production of turpentine in the 
south there does not seem to be any 
coming to this market, and from the in- 
formation available the possibility of 
getting any is more remote than ever. 
The paint men have a little for their im- 
mediate needs but there is none off'ering 
from any quarter for the present. Those 
handling it are hopeful of improvement 
but this will be slow in coming it is 
generally agreed. Price quotations are 
therefore not made but jobbers are of- 
fering small lots in cans at high prices. 

Turpentine — Per Imp. Gallon 

1 to 4 barrels .... 

5 barrels and over .... 

Small quantities 10c advance over 1 bbl. prices. 

Linseed Oil Reaches $2 
Result of U.S. Embargo 

Montreal. 

LINSEED OIL.— In view of the em- 
bargo on flaxseed from the Argentine 
markets placed by the United States 
War Board at the end of last week, the 
reflected effect here is shown in a sharp 
advance for linseed oil. This factor is 
the big one in such a change and the 
somewhat pessimistic reports from flax 
producing centres has contributed also 
to a firming of seed prices, quota- 
tions for boiled oil advancing to $2 
per gallon. July flax reached $4.10 on 
Tuesday and will probably go higher be- 
fore it recedes. From all accounts there 
will be little improvement in the stocks 



throughout the States for many weeks 
and in view of the large consumption 
there it would appear that there will 
continue to be high prices. Demand heie 
is being met in the various quantities 
asked for at the usual price spreads 
given below. 

Raw Boiled 

Linseed Oil — Imp. gal. Imp. gal. 

1 to 4 barrels $1 97 $1 99%-$2 00 

5 to 9 barrels 1 96 1 98Vi- 1 99 

10 to 25 barrels 1 95 1 971-.- 1 98 

Indications Are Strong 

in the Putty Market 

Montreal. 

PUTTY. — It is now a question hovv 
long present prices can hold for putty. 
There is a well-defined tendency toward 
a firming of the market and a revision 
upward will not come as a surprise. 
There is not any morj than the usual 
activity but this is reasonably good for 
the season. With building operations 
nil within the city such movement as 
there is comes largely from the outside. 
Per 100 lbs. 
Standard Putty — 5 ton 1 ton Les* 

Bulk, in barrels $4.00 $4.15 $4.36 

Do.. 14 barrels 4.15 4.30 4.50 

Do., 100 lb 4.85 5.00 5.20 

Do., 25 lb 4.85 5.00 6.20 

Do.. 121/2 lb 6.10 5.25 5.45 

3 and 5 lb. tins 6.85 7.00 7.20 

1 and 2 lb. tins 7.35 7.50 7.70 

Pure linseed oil putty. $2.00 per 100 lb. ad- 
vance on above prices. 

Glaziers' putty — $1.60 per 100 lb. advance on 
above prices. 

Terms : 2%, 15 days, net 60. 

Steady and Firm is 

White Fead in Oil 

WHITE. LEAD IN OIL.— In view of 
the fact that oil has again risen sharply 
and with its prospect promising for held 
prices, white lead in oil is firm and the 
undertone a strong one. Some jobbers 
feel that there will be no higher prices 
for the immediate future, but, as with 
most raw materials, this commodity is 
ruling strong and will so continue. Five 
ton lots at the base price per 100 pounds 
are quoted at $16.50; ton lots at $17 and 
smaller quantities $17.35. 

Movement is Normal; 

Mixed Paint Steady 

Montreal. 

MIXED PAINT.— While the activity 
in paint circles is just about what might 
be looked for at this season of the year 
there still is some movement of sorting 
orders. For specialities the season notes 
the usual condition, although it has been 
stated that the more necessary preserv- 
ative paints have been in greater de- 
mand. With prices firm and steady 



there is nothing to indicate immediate 
revision of prices. These will have to 
be reconsidered, however, should all the 
dominant features surrounding rule as 
they are to-day. 

TORONTO 

TORONTO, July 11.— Featuring the 
markets during the week are ad- 
vances of from 7c to 14c on linseed 
oil and 3c on turpentine, some dealers 
on turps withdrawing prices altogether 
pending arrival of further supplies. Tur- 
pentine is apparently as hard to get as 
ever. A very good demand for ready- 
mixed paint continues to be manifest. 
White lead holds firm and unchanged 
while glass and putty pursue same 
course. 

Linseed Oil Reaches 

Higher Levels 

Toronto. 

LINSEED OIL.— An advance of from 
7c to 14c per gallon in linseed oil is pro- 
vided for in quotation of $1.97 prevail- 
ing on raw this week. Big advances in 
the seed market are to be noted for the 
week. No. 1 N.W.C. advancing 30c fro;n 
Wednesday last till yesterday. As re- 
gards future supplies, the situation is 
one of decided uncertainty and spot 
stocks are none too heavy. Crop condi- 
tions are by no means sufficiently far 
advanced to determine what may develop 
in the fall. It is understood the Unites 
States government has prohibited the 
import of seed from the Argentine and 
all factors tend towards a very strong 
market. Cheaper oil is not looked for 
for some time to come, and even higher 
prices would not be surprising. Present 
range of quotations follows: 

Raw Boiled 

Imp. gal. Imp. gal. 

1 to 2 bbls 1 97 1 99VJ-2 00 

3 to 5 bbls 1 96 1 98V2-1 99 

6 to 9 bbls 1 94 1 96»4-l 97 

Less than barrel lots 10c per gallon higher than 
single barrel prices. 

Turpentine Again 

Records Advance 

Toronto. 

TURPENTINE.— Another 3c jump has 
been made in prices on turpentine, and 
as a matter of fact some dealers have 
withdrawn prices altogether until fur- 
ther supplies are available. Stocks gen- 
erally are very light and the situation 
remains uncertain as outlined in these 
columns previously. Primary points re- 
cord a slight decline for the week but 
the general feeling is that higher prices 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



57 



Sell More Paint During the Summer 

You Can Do It With 

THE RIGHT PAINT TO PAINT RIGHT 




A. RAMSAY & SON, COMPANY 

Makers oj Paints and Varnishes Since 1842 

TORONTO MONTREAL Vancouver 



if any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



58 



will again rule within a few days. Ths 
demand is not very heavy, retailers ap- 
parently having fair supplies and only 
buying as required. Quotations are be- 
ing made as follows: 

Imp. gal. 

1 barrel 1 03 

2 to 4 barrels 

5 gallon lots 1 13 

Mixed Paints 

Selling Well 

Toronto. 

MIXED PAINTS.— Mixed paints con- 
tinue to move forward in very good 
quantities and paint manufacturers and 
jobbers are well satisfied with volume of 
business being handled. Prices have 
held firm and unchanged at figures 
shown in current market quotations. 

No Change Made 

in White l^ead in Oil 

Toronto. 

WHITE LEAD IN OIL.— There have 
been no new developments' in the market 
during the week, prices being maintained 
at advances recently put into effect and 
the demand along lines prevailing for 
some time past is rather quiet. Price 
prevailing on pure, ton basis, is $17.25 
per 100 pounds. Stocks of Paris green 
are said to be rather light and a very 
good demand is in evidence. Arsenate 
of lead is also moving forward freely. 
Prices hold at figures shown in current 
market quotations. 

Little of Interest in 

Glass or Putty 

Toronto. 

GLASS, PUTTY.— There is little of 
interest in either glass or putty reported. 
The demand for glass is confined to 
rather narrow channels and stocks are 
equal to all orders. The glass industry 
is in a very uncertain position, particu- 
larly plate, as all employers of more 
than 100 men must now secure their men 
through the government Department of 
Labor instead of the open market. This 
means that with glass^ down pretty well 
on the list of necessary industries, thaL 
operations will very likely be greatly 
curtailed. Prices on putty hold un- 
changed, bulk in barrels selling at $4.70 
per 100 pounds, while 25-lb. and 100-lb. 
drums sell at $5.55. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Firm Told Must 

Stop Certain Practices 

The Federal Trade Commission at 
Washington, D.C., has issued the follow- 
ing: 

"S. C Johnson & Son of Racine, Wis., 
have been ordered by the Federal Trade 
Commission to desist from the practice's, 
held to be unfair, enumerated below: 

"1. Giving or offering to give to em- 
ployes of customers, prospective 
customers or competitors' customers and 
prospective customers, as an inducement 
to influence their employers to deal with 
the respondent firm, gratuities such as 
liquors, cigars, meals, theatre tickets, 
valuable presents and other personal 
property. 2. Giving or offering to give 
to the same classes of employees amuse- 
ments or diversions of any kind. 3. Giv- 
ing or offering to give such employees 
money for the purpose named." 



Linseed Cannot be 

Imported Into U.S. 

According to a recent order of the 
War Trade Board of the United States 
linseed has been placed on the restricted 
list of imports. All outstanding licenses 
for importation by sea have been revok- 
ed, though that now in transit or to be 
transported in vessels now loading will 
be permitted entry. This will apparently 
affect the importation of flaxseed from 
the Argentine Republic and will throw 
still heavier demands on the supplies 
which are grown in Canada and the 
United States. 



Got Right Paint But 

the Wrong Church 

The painters employed by Leopold 
Guggenberger of Hastings-on-Hudson 
were ordered out at the beginning of 
last week to decorate the exterior of St. 
Matthew's German Lutheran Church in 
Main street. They returned with their 
paint pots and brushes to the Guggen- 
berger headquarters last night, having 
finished the job but having painted by 
some inadvertence the outside walls of 
Grace Church, also in Main street. 

The Guggenberger exclamations at 
discovering the error were neither vague 
nor mild. He seized the nearest paint 
pot and made for all three daubers at 
once. With each succeeding pot he hui'led 
remarks of such character that any one 
of them, if true, would have justified 
a heavenly dispensation of sudden and 
violent death for the offenders. 

This morning Grace Church stands re- 
splendent in a fine coat of unauthorized 
paint, and the Lutheran Church is as it 
was when the congregation decided to 
spick up. What will happen when the 
congregations assemble for worship is a 
subject that the honorable Guggenberger 
was debating with himself as he sat in 
his paint store. He could foresee two 
dire things. Either the Grace Church 
flock would mob him for changing the 
fair exterior of its building or the Lu- 
therans would mob him for doing noth- 
ing at all to theirs. 

At a late hour he heard a rumor that 
the communicants of the respective con- 
gregations were gathered for massed ac- 
tion on the village green. At that Bos/ 
Painter Guggenberger doused the lights 
in his shop and stole quietly and unos- 
tentatiously home. — New York Times. 



Mail Order 

Advertising Barred 

Everybody's Magazine announced ii. 
recent issue of Printer's Ink that they 
would not accept any more mail order 
advertising. They state "this step is 
necessary to aggressive support of the 



July 13, 1918 

principle of retail distribution of mer- 
chandise. Everybody's believes that the 
regularly organized channels of trade 
ofter the best available system of dis- 
tribution of advertised goods for the 
sound interests and welfare of the ulti- 
mate consumer." The Butterick publi- 
cations made similar announcement the 
early part of this year. 

It is only a few years ago since these 
same magazines were talking about forc- 
ing the dealer to handle certain lines of 
goods. Most firms are recognizing to- 
day the power of the retail dealer and 
that it is more profitable to try to edu- 
cate the dealer to the merits of certain 
brands of goods, that he can make a pro- 
fit on handling these lines, rather than 
to attempt to force him merely by con- 
sumer advertising. 



I 



BIG MOTOR ACCESSORY SHOW AT 
CHICAGO 

Monday and Tuesday, September 16 
and 17, have been set aside as "Hard- 
ware Dealers' Days," at the National 
Exposition of trucks, tractors, and ac- 
cessories, to be held at the Municipal 
Pier, Chicago, from September 14-21. 
The Exposition Committee, which has 
secured the reservation for that week of 
all the Pier, save that portion used by 
the U.S. Navy Department as a train- 
ing school for ensigns, has set aside the 
beautiful Auditorium at the east side of 
the Pier for the use of the hardware 
men in meetings. 

That the Exposition in September will 
prove itself the biggest undertaking of 
its kind is already certain it is claimed 
from the fact that a much greater num- 
ber of manufacturers contracted for 
display space before the end of June 
than the total number who exhibited 
last year. And the floor space con- 
tracted for up to the end of June was 
much greater than all the floor space in 
the famous Coliseum building in Chi- 
cago. 

This Exposition will bring together 
the hardware jobbers, wholesalers and 
retailers and will demonstrate to all the 
value of handling what is fast growing 
and is a most important line with 
hardware men. 



To Change the Name of Berlin Kettle 

An effort is being made by certain 
manufacturers in the United States to 
have the name of the Berlin kettle and 
saucepans, etc., changed to the name 
"Washington." Several United 'States 
manufacturers have entirely discarded 
for obvious reasons the trade name of 
"Berlin" as applied to certain types of 
utensils. Action along this line was 
taken by Canadian manufacturers a long 
time ago. The kettles ordinarily known 
as Berlin kettles now bear the names of 
London kettles and Kitchener kettles. 



The first big outdoor event of the 
Montreal Bicycle and Motorcycle Deal- 
ers' Association was considered a de- 
cided success. It consisted of a decor- 
ated wheel and costume parade on Sat- 
urday, 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



69 



ROCK ISLAND 



A Type and Size 
for EveryServiec 




No. 241 — Autovise 



A Combination Pipe and Anvil Vise 
—particularly suitable for auto repair 
work. Write for catalogue and prices. 



Factory and Office : 



ROGK ISLAND MFG. CO. 



ROCK ISLAND, ILL., U.S.A. 

New York 
113 Chambers Street 



Chicago 
180 North Market Street 



Pumps that Carry 
Good-Will 

Dealers that sell McDougall's "Are- 
macdee" Hand or Motor Metal Force or 
Lift Pumps give their customers lasting- 
satisfaction. 

Every pump sold 
stays sold — gives the 
dealer no trouble. 

They are metal — 
hand-fitted valves — 
air-tight — strong — 
lasting. 

The big catalogue 
tells you exactly what 
the line is — get it for the asking. 

WRITE 

The R. McDougall Co. 

LIMITED 

GALT, CANADA 




llMAOE IN CANADaII 



CONFID 



THE firmly establish- 
ed confidence in 
Berry Brothers var- 
nishes, enamels and 
stains which makes 
them so easy to sell is 
based on their unvary- 
ing quality for sixty 
years Their dependa- 
biUty is so well known 
that the Berry label is 
recognised among dis- 
criminating buyers as 
a guarantee that a 1 
products so'd under it 
can be safely trusted. 

'Berry" brands always sat 
isfy the consumers and thus 
create a permanent demand 
for them. It pays the dealer 
to push them because they 
are a sure foundation for a 
larger and growing varnish 
trade. 

BERRYJ3ROTHERC 
/orld-s i^r^estV&rnishMakersV-' 

Established 1858 

Walkerville, Ont. 

678) 



60 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 

These prices are for such quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers. Large buyers can frequently make purchases at better prices. 



AMMUNITION 

Domloion MetalHcs — B.B. Caps, 
26% B.B. Caps, 20% ; 22 short, 
Uadk, tZ lone black, 22 lone, 
■mokalcsa, 20% ; 22 short lesmok or 
Z2 long lesmok, 20% ; 22 short, 
smokeless, 80% ; 22 lone rifle, black. 
•2 lone rifle, smokeless, 7V2% ; 
other rim fire, 10% ; center fire 
pistol, add 35% list : center fire 
sportinsr, add 60% ; shot cartridges, 
same as ball; brass shot shell, 20% ; 
prbners, add 36% list ; empty shot 
ahella, 6%; blanks, add 25%; bul- 
lets, add 40%. 

Terms: Net 90 days, or 2% d48- 
•ount for cash in 30 days. 

"Dominion" Loaded Paper Shells 
"Grown" Black Powder, 10% on 
Brt ; Sovereign" Bulk Smokeless 
Ppwder, net list; "Regal" Dense 
siaokeless Powder, net list: "Im- 
perial" Shells, both Bulk and 
Dense Smokeless Powder, net list ; 
""tJanuek" Smokeless, net list : 
Rmpty Shells, 5% ; 90 days net. 

F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Lon- 
don. Hamilton. 
AMERICAN AMMUNITION 
List Prices. 
Subject to 10% advance on lint. 
B.B. caps, $3.50 per M. ; B.B. 
caps, concave ball, $4.40 ; 22 short, 
$5 ; 22 long, $6 ; 22 long rifle, $7 : 
22 short smokeless, $5.35 ; 22 long 
smokeless, $7.50 ; 22 long rifle, 
amckeless, $8.75 per M. 

jhiorting Cartridges— Centre Fire 
Snftkelesa 803 Winchester, $72.25 
per M. ; 303 Savage. $72.25 ; 303 
British, $96 ; 32 Winchester special. 
J72.25; 38-55 Winchester. $76; 401 
Winchester self-loading. $76 per M. 
Primera— Noe. 1. 1% and 2Mt. 
«.««: No». 1 and 2 (100 in box). 
t»M: Nos. 1-W. 1^-W, 21^-W and 
l-W. and 6, and 6%, 100, in box, 
W.80: Berdan Nos. 1, 1%, 2 (250 in 
*ox), $8.60: Berdan Nos. 1, ly,. 2 
(100 in box). $8.80; new No. 4. 
IB. 60; U.M.C.. 88. $6.50. 

Shot, standard. 100 lbs.. Toronto. 
«17.85-$19.76 ; Montreal. $18: net 
extras, as follows, subject to caah 
discount only : Chilled. $1.60 : buck 
and seal. 80c; No. 28 ball. $1.20 
per 100 lbs. ; bags less than 25 
lbs.. %c per lb. ; f.o.b. Montreal. 
Toronto. Hamilton. London, St. 
John and Halifax freight equalized. 
AUGER BITS 
Standard List Prices per dozen. 

*/16 $6.00 18/16 $12.00 

«'16 6.00 19/16 14.00 

If/16 6.00 20/16 14.00 

«/16 6.00 21/16 16.00 

7/16 5.00 22/16 16.00 

«Al6 6.00 28/16 18.00 

9/16 6.00 24/16 18.00 

10''16 6.00 25/16 21.00 

11^16 7.00 2S/16 21.00 

12/16 7.00 27/16 24.00 

18 '16 8.25 28/16 24.00 

14'16 8.25 29/16 27.00 

15/16 9.50 30/16 27.00 

U/16 9.50 31/16 30.00 

17/16 12.00 32/16 30.00 

Discounts from Standard List 
prices : 

Beaver, 571/.% • London. 57%%. 
Pord's Anger Bits. 35 to 27^2'/<. 
Gilmour Auger Bits. 47%%. 
Gilmour Car Bits. %iy^% . 
Gilmour Eye Augers. 35%. 
Gilmour Ship Augers. Viy-^fc. 
Rockford Auger Bits, 50 and lO'^^. 
Irwin Auger Bits. 15% to 17i/_.% ofT 
list in Catalogue No. 10. 190.'.. 
F.O.B. Toronto. Montreal London 
AXES and Hamilton. 

Single Bits, doz $14 00 $16 00 

Double Bit 16 50 19 60 

Boys' Axes 12 00 14 00 

Hunters' Axes 11 00 12 00 

Bench— No. 2, doz. . . 12 50 13 20 
No. 3, doz... 13 50 14 20 
No. 4, doz... 14 50 16 25 



Single Double 



Bit 



Bit 

$20 00 

19 oc 



Sager $15 00 

Dominion Pride 14 50 

St. Clair handled. . . 15 50 

Sager Boys 12 50 

Kitchener Boys 12 00 

Sager Hunters 11 50 

Kitchener Hunters'... 11 00 
P.O.B. J! ontreal. Toronto. Hamil- 

t»n. London. 
BABBITT 

Prices on babbitt fluctuate with 
the metal markets and prices are 
quoted on application. Prices range 
from 14c to $1.15 a lb. 
BELTING (Leather) 

Discounts apply to Revised List 
of Feb. 14. 1907. 
Extra Quality. 30. 5%. 
Standard Quality. 40%. 
Side Lace Leather, lb. .$1.40-$1.75 
Cut Lace Leather, lb... 1.60- 1.9.> 
F.O.B. Montreal. Toronto. 

BELLS (Farm) 

No. 1 X 40. lb ■. .. $4 0" 

No. 2 X 50 lb 5 00 

No. 3 X 60 lb 7 50 

No. 4 X 100 lb 10 00 

F.O.B. Montreal. Toronto. 
BOLTS AND NUTS 

Discounts apply to list of 

Feb. 1. 1913. 

Carriage Bolts ($1 list). % in. dia. 

and smaller. 10%. 
Carriage Bolts ($1 list). 7-16 dia. 

and larger, net list. 
Machine Bolts, % in. dia. and 

smaller, 10%. 
Machine Bolts, 7-16 in. dia. and 

larger, net list. 
Sleigh Shoe Bolts, all sizes, net list. 
CoacA and Lag Screws. 25%. 
Skein Bolts. 20%. 
Square Head Blank Bo!u, net list. 
Bolt Ends, net list. 
Plow Bolts, net list. 
Elevator Bolts, net list. 
Fancy Head Bolts, net list. 
Shaft Bolts ($3 list), net list. 
Step Bolts, large head ($3 list), net 

list. 
Whiffletree Bolts, net list. 
Nuts, square, blank, add to list 

$1.50. 
Nuts, square, tapped, add to list 

$1.75. 
Nuts, hexagon, blank, add to list 

$1.76. 
Nuts, hexagon, tapped, add to list 

$2. 
Stove bolts. 55%. 
Tire bolts. 35%. 
Terms: 2% off 30 days from date 

of shipment. 
F.O.B. Montreal. Toronto. Hamil- 
ton. London. Ont. 
BORAX 

Lump Crystal Borax, lb 14-14% 

F.O.B. Montreal. London, Toronto. 
BRASS Per lb. 

Spring sheets, 24 gauge and 

heavier, base $0 43 

Rods, base % to 1 in. round. .38-40 

Tubing, seamless base 45V4-50 

Tubing, iron pipe size, base 

% in. and up to 3 in 45%-50 

Copper tubing, iron pipe size, 

base % in. up to 3 in 47'/2-53 

F.O.B. Montreal and Toronto. 
BOILERS (Range) 

30-gal. extra heavy $14.50-$n 

30-gal. Standard 14 00 

F.O.B. Montreal and Toronto. 
BOARDS (Wash) Zinc Doz. 

Pony $2 25 

Improved Globe 4 PO 

Neptune 4 60 

Standard Globe 4 PO 

Original Globe 5 40 

Jubilee 5 50 

Newmarket King 5 50 

Diamond King (glass) 6 00 

Western King (enamel) ... 7 00 

Beaver (brass) 7 00 

F.O.B. Newmarket. 



BUTTS Wrought Steel:— 

No. 840 5% 

No. 800 2%% 

No. 838 5% 

No. 808 5% 

No. 804 15% 

Nos. 802, 842. 844 6% 

Nos. 810 and 814 net list 

No. 830 2%% 

F.O.B. Toronto. Montreal. London. 

Hamilton. 

Spring Butts 
Chicago Spring Hinges. List. 
Triplex Spring Hinges. 20-10-5%. 
Chicago Mortise Floor (5000). 

33 1-3%. 
Chicago Relax Floor (6000). 25-10 

10-7y2%. 
Chicago Premier (4000). 16 2-3%. 
Chicago Ajax (3000). 16 2-3%. 
Chicago Fire Station, add 10% tt- 

list. 
Lavatory Door Hinges. 20-5%. 
Chicago Screen Door (2000). 40- 

7y2%. 

Chicago Screen Door (3000). 16 %-■'< 

and 5%. 
Non-Hold Back Screen Door, on ap- 
plication. F.O.B. Chicago. 
CANS 

For discount on milk and cream 
cans. etc.. see list under head of 
wares, etc. 

B.B. B.B.B. 

Fire Welded Fire 

CHAIN Proof Coil Welded 

Mont'l Tor'to Mont'l Tor'to 

3-16 in. ..$22.75 $19.85 $ $ 

% in. .. 16.75 15.25 21.75 20.23 
5-16 in... 14.15 13.65 19.00 17.00 
% in. .. 13.00 12.75 15.90 16.50 
7-16 in... 12.75 12.45 15.65 16.00 
1/, in. .. 12.50 12.15 15.50 15.75 
9-16 in... 12.50 12.15 15.50 15.75 
% in. . . 12.35 12.00 15.25 15.50 
% in. .. 12.25 11.85 15.10 15.23 
% in. . . 12.05 11.65 15.00 15.23 
1 in. ... 11.90 11.50 14.85 15.23 
Electric Welded 

B.B. B.B.B. 

3-16 in.. .$16.95 $17.40 $ $ 

y^ in. .. 13.15 13.30 13.75 15.55 
5-16 in... 11.85 11.75 12.00 14. OC 
% in. .. 11.65 10.50 11.75 12.75 
7-16 in... 10.45 10.50 11.75 12.75 
V. in. . . 10.20 10.50 11.75 12.75 
% in. .. 10.10 10.50 11.75 12.75 
% in. .. 9.95 10.50 11.75 12.75 
Montreal and Toronto. 

American Proof Coil Chaii 
B.B. B.B.B. 

3-16 in $16.75 

5-16 in 12.00 $12 75 

% in 11.00 11.90 

7-16 in 10.75 11.70 

y.2 in 10.50 11.60 

% in 10.35 

Electric Welded B.B.B.— Chain, Vi 
in.. $13.75: 5-16 in.. $12 F.o.b. To 
ronto. 

Cow ties. 12y2-15%; trace chains, 
net list; dog chains. 25 to 321/.%: 
halter chains. 25 to 32%% ; tie-out 
chains, 45-5'/c : stall fixtures, net 
list; breast chains. 2V2%- F.O.B. 
Montreal. Toronto. Hamilton. Lon- 
don. 
CEMENT 

Cement, per bbl., $2.70 in car- 
lots ; $3.25 bbl. in small lots. 

Paris plaster, five-barrel lots 
$3.1O-$3.50: single barrel. $3.10- 
^:i.30. F.O.B. Toronto. 

CHURNS 

List price hand chums : — No. 
S9 ; No. 1. $9 ; No. 2, $10 : No. 3 
$11: No. 4, $13; No. 5. $16. 

List prices power chui^s : — No. 
$11; No. 1, $11; No. 2. $12: No. 3 
$13: No. 4. $17; No. 6. $20. 

Discount of 20% f.o.b. Toronto 
Hamilton. Fergus. London. Si 
Marys. 

Discount of 17%% f.o.b. Mon- 
treal. Ottawa, Kingston. 

«t. .Tohn N B. 20%. 
CHOPPERS, FOODUniversal (doz.) 

No. $17. 7n 

No. 1 21.50 



No. 2 27.00 

No. 3 36.00 

F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. 
Russwin — 

No. $17 7» 

No. 1 21 7» 

No. 2 24 96 

No. 3 84 «« 

CLOTHES LINE (GkWuiized) 
No. Per 1000 fi. 

17— 7-strand. 100 ft. lenetks..<6 80 
17— 7-strand, 60 ft. lengths... 7 00 
18— 6-strand. 100 ft. length... 6 40 
18— 6-strand. bO ft. lengths... 6 46 
19— (-strand, 100 ft. lengtha.. 4 7t 
19— 6-strand. 50 ft. lengths.. 5 00 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. London 
COPPER Montreal Toroni. 

Casting ingot, see weekly ren""^ 

Bars, % to 2 in $43 50 $43 00 

Plain sheets, base 16 

oz. and heavier. . . 47 00 44 00 . 
Copper sheet, tinned. 

14x60 in.. 14 oz.. . 49 00 

Copper sheet, plan- 
ished, base 16 oz. 

and heavier 58 00 45 OO 

Braziers' in. sheeta, 

6x4 base 46 00 44 00 

Above prices are full sheets ano 
bars. Cut sheets and ban are 5< 
per lb. higher. 
COMBS 

Curry combs: No. 111. $1.55; No. 
121. $1.70: No. 122, $2.25; No. 127. 
$2.25 ; No. 100, $2.80 per dozen. 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Hamil 

ton, London 
CORD (SASH) 

No. 6, lb 72 

No. 7, lb 71 

Nos. 8, 9, 10, 12 70 

F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London 
CANADA PLATES 

Prices nominal. Montreal Toronu 
Ordinary, 62 sheets.Jll 76 t 8 SO 
Galranized 
Apollo Crown Gorbal* 

18x24x62 

60 

CHARCOAL, TIN PLATES 
M.L.S. and Famous — Per box 

IC, 20x28 base 1*8 0« 

IX. 20x28 base (nominal) ... 82 09 
IXX. 20x28 base (nominal).. 86 00 
IXXX. 20x28 base (nominal) 40 0« 

F.O.B. Toronto 
Raven and Murex Grades — 
IC. 20x28 base, 112 sheeta. .$40 00 
IX, 20x28 base. 112 sheet*.. 89 00 
IXX. 20x28 base, 56 sheets.. 20 M 
IXXX. 20x28 base. 56 sheeta 21 0» 

(Nominal) f.o.b. Montreal. 
TERNE PLATES 

I. C, 20 X 28, 112 sheets 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
COKES, AMERICAN 
Bessemer Steel — 

20x28 IC. 112 sheet 30 00 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
"DOMINION CROWN BESr'— 
DOUBLE COATED TISSUE 

Nomina' 

IC. 14x20 base $20 00 

IX. 14x20 base 18 7» 

IXX. 14x20 base 19 6« 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
CLOCKS 

Big Ben $2 92 

Good Morning, each 1 1* 

Lookout 1 4B-1 M 

Sleepmeter 1 65 

F.O.??. Montreal. Toronto. London 

Hamilton. 
CROWBARS, $8.50-$9.50 per 10') 

lbs. 
DRILLS 

Bit Stock Drills. 30 to 87%%. 
Rd. Shk., 30 to 37%%. 
Wood Drills. 37%%. 
DOORS. SCREEN 

Kasement. No. 1. $24.84 to I27.«< 
doz. ; No. 2 and 8. $28.20 to IIO.M 
Hn'T P'.O.B. Toronto. 

EMERY CLOTH 

See under Sandpaper. 
ENAMELWARE 

See prices under heading Ware* 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



61 



The Babbitt Metal that's at the 

Front in Efficiency and Economy 

HARRIS HEAVY 
PRESSURE 

The Aristocrat of Babbitts 

St. Lawrence Paper Mills Co., Limited 

Mille Roches. Ont. 

The Canada Metal Co., Ltd., 

Fraser Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
Dear Sirs: 

We feel like putting in a good word for your 
Heavy Pressure Babbitt. We installed a very heavy 
machine some time ago, which had all brass boxes. 
The shafts weigh six tons each with a top roll 
weighing four tons, also a lever pressure making a 
total pressure of about fourteen tons. The brass 
boxes wore out in four weeks. We then put in Heavy 
Pressure Babbitt and am pleased to say that we have 
no more trouble. We put in Heavy Pressure in a 
very heavy machine eighteen months ago and there 
seems to be no preceptible wear. 

We thank you for supplying us with a babbitt 
that gives such good results. Yours truly. 

Per C. F. BUSS, Superintendent. 

THE CANADA METAL COMPANY, Limited 

Head Office and Factory: TORONTO Branch Factories: HAMILTON, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 




EVERYTHING IN METALS, PIG LEAD, PIG TIN, 
INGOT COPPER, ZINC, ALUMINUM, ANTIMONY 



Display REED'S Plastic Asphalt Roof 
Cement — It Sells Itself 



Dealers will find a ready sale in Reed's Plastic-Asphalt Roof 
Cement, the quickest and most permanent repair for Slate, Metal, 
Shingle and Composition Roofs. 

Reed's Cement always does the work right, and 25 years of con- 
tinuous use has proven it best on the market. 

That's why it sells best. Reed's cement is simple to apply, will 
not harden with cold, or run with heat. Always remains plastic. 

Prominently display a full row of "Reeds," then watch for silent 
sales. It will more than please you. 

Order from your jobber, or 



GEO. W. REED C§k CO., 37 st. antoine st., MONTREAL 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answei-ed. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



FILES AND RASPS 

Disoounts below apply t« list 
of Nov. 1, 1899. % 

Great Western, Amer 50 

Kearney & Foot, Arcade 50 

Jf. Barton Smith, Eagle 50 

P.H. and Imperial 50 

Disston Brand 40 

Globe eo 

Nicholson 30-321/2 

Black Diamond 32''/2 

Delta Files 37% 

F.O.B. Toronto, Montreal, London. 

and Hamilton. 

FITTINGS 

Cast iron fittings, net list ; Mal- 
leable bushings, 15-18% ; cast bush- 
ings, 15-18% ; unions, 30% ; plugs, 
10-15% off list. Net prices ; Class 
B, black, 27-28C lb. ; Class C, 
black, 18-19c lb. ; galvanized. Class 
B, 37-39C lb. ; Class C, 27-28c lb. 
F.o.b. Toronto and Montreal. 

GRILLS, ELECTRIC 

Single heat, round $6 0" 

Three heat, round 7 15 

F.o.b. Toronto. 

GRINDSTONES Per 100 lbs 

Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick... $2 50 

Under 40 lbs 2 60 

Bi-Treadle, each 6.25 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
HALTERS (SNAP AND RING) 

Doz 
Russet rope shank, 1".$11.25-$12.75 
Russet rope shank, II4 in... 13 8S 

Black rope shank, 1 in 18 T.l 

Black rope shank. I14 in. 12.50- 13.85 
Hand sewn, no shank, 1 in.. 17. 4i) 
Hand sewn, no shank. 1% in. 20.20 

Halters (Sisal). 

7-16 in. gross, $24 ; 9-16 in., $36. 
F.o.b. Toronto. London— 7-16 in.. 
$2.10 doz. ; % in., $2.65 doz. 

HAMMERS, SLEDGE 

Can., 5 lbs. and over, cwt...$17 50 
Masons, 5 lbs. and over, per 

cwt 20 00 

Masons, 6 lbs. and under 22 50 

Napping, up to 2 lbs 25 00 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London. 

HANDLES (WOOD) 

All hickory handles, 10%. Ail 
netfkyokes, whiffletrees and double- 
trees, 10%. All ash and maple han- 
dles, wood hay rakes, horse pokes 
20'%. 

F.o.b. St. Thomas, London. 
Strathroy, Toronto. 

HANGERS, BARN AND PARLOR 

List 
Atlas, No. . 

Atlas, No. 1 , 
Atlas, No. 2 
Stearns, 4 in. 
Stearns, 5 in. 

Perfect, No. 1 10 45 

Perfect, No. ly^ 13 20-13 80 

Storm King and safety hang- 
ers, doz 10.60 

Steel track, 1% in 9.00-12.00 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
HEATERS, ELECTRIC 

Majestic, 1 Burner 7 50 

Majestic, 2 Burner 11 25 

F.o.b. Toronto. 

HINGES, TEE AND STRAP 

Heavy, Net Prices. 

Strap 

4-inch, dozen pairs $2 34 

5-inch 2 89 

6-inch 3 12 

8-inch 4 22 

10-inch 7 49 

12-inch 9 28 

14-inch 10 61 

Light, List Prices, 
doz. pairs, 
doz. pairs . 
doz. pairs, 
doz. pairs . 
doz. pairs, 
doz. pairs . 



13 30 
13 80 
15 80 
9 75 
13 20 



Tee 

$1 99 

2 50 

2 8! 

3 21 
5 70 
9 05 
9 20 



3- in., 
4-in., 
5-in., 
6-in., 
8-in., 
10-in., 



$1 00 
1 20 
1 40 

1 70 

2 50 

3 50 



Discount 20 and 2%% off list. 



$1 00 
1 10 
1 30 
1 60 

1 80 

2 4u 



Screw Hook and Strap Hinse — 

Under 12 in., per 100 lbs 8 00 

Over 14 in., per 100 lbs 7 60 

Extra hooks for above % in., 

per lb 8 

Extra hooks for above, % in., 

per lb 7% 

F.o.b. Toronto, London, Hamilton 
and Montreal. 

HAY KNIVES 

Spear Point $14 00 

Lightning 12 50 

Heath's 12 50 

HOES, Grub 10 00 

HOOKS, GRASS. English 

Canadian Fox 
No. 2, per doz... $3 40 $5 00-$5 50 
No. 3, per doz... 3 50 5 50- 6-40 
No. 4. per doz... 3 50 6 00- 7 40 

Little Giant 5 25 - ... 

Berden 5 25 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
H O RSESHOES Price per keg 

No. 2 No. 1 
Sizes and and 
Patterns made larger smaller 

Less 20c 
Light iron ... 0-7 $6 75 $7 00 
Long heel light 

iron 3-7 6 75 

Medium iron.. 1-8 6 75 7 00 

Heavy iron ... 6-8 6 75 

Snow 1-6 7 00 7 25 

New-light "XL" 

steel 1-6 7 20 7 45 

Fetherweight 

"XL" steel .0-4 8 60 

Special counter- 
sunk 0-4 9 10 

Toe- weight (front 

only) 1-4 9 60 

•All sizes. 

Packing — Up to 3 sizes in on» 
keg. 10c per 100 lbs. extra. More 
than 3 sizes. 25c per 100 lbs. extra. 
1 F.o.b. Montreal and Belleville. 

Terms — Cash in thirty days, less 
' 2% discount. 

I TOE CAULKS 

I Nos. 1. 2 and larger, sharp an* 
I blunt. $2.25 to $2.90 box. 

HOSE. LAWN Toront.. 

Corrugated. V<, in.. 100 ft... $15 7n 

Corrugated. % in., 100 ft 18 7? 

Corrugated. % in., 100 ft... 21 5(1 

Corrugated. 1 in., 100 ft 31 50 

Less 5% for full reels, 600 ft 
F.o.b. Toronto and London. 
HAT AND COAT HOOKS 

Coppered wire. 3 in.. 95c gross 
F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. Hamilton 
London. 

IRON AND STEEL. 

See weekly report. 
IRON. TINNED 
Prices nominal. Subject to premiun' 

where stocks are obtainable. 
72x30 up to 24 gauge, case 

lots 

72x30, 26 gauge, case lots 

T>ess than esse. 50c per 100 lbs. ex 
tra. F.o.b. Montreal. 

IRONS (SAD) 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55. polished. 

per set 2.20-2.30 

Mrs. Potts, No. 50, nickel- 
plated, set 2.30-2.40 

Mrs. Potts, handles, japan- 
ned, doz 1.30- 1.50 

Sad irons, common, plain, 3, 

4 and 5 lbs 9 20 

Sad irons, plain, 6 lbs. up. . . . 7 00 

Sad irons, common, plated... 5 50 

Princess Electric, each .... 3 35 

Canadian Beauty Electric Irons — 

Style A $3 75 

Style B 4 12 

Hotpoint Domestic Electric 

Iron, each 4 75 

Gasoline Sad Irons, each,,.. 4 26 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. London, 
Hsmilton. 



LADDERS, ETC. 

Step Ladders Per ft. 

Crescent 19c ft. 

Household 19c ft. 

Standard, 4-12 ft 21c ft. 

Electrician 30c ft. 

Hea\'y duty 47c ft. 

Extension 35c ft. 

Per ft. 

Perfect, 6 to 10 ft. only $0 3. 

Hercules, 4 to 10 ft 33 

Hercules, 12 to 14 ft 38 

Faultless, 4 to 10 ft. only... 29 

Ontario, 4 to 10 ft. only 26 

Shelf Lock, 4 to 8 ft. only 21 

Extension Ladders Per ft. 

Up to 32 ft 23 

34 to 40 ft 26 

London — Up to 34 ft., 23c ; 36-40 
ft., 26c ft. 

Fire Ladders up to 32 feet aro 
twice the price of ordinary exten- 
sions. Over 32 ft. are supplied 
with supporting legs at three times 
the price. 

Single and Fmit Picking. 

10 ft. to 16 ft 20c ft. 

18 ft. to 22 ft 23c ft. 

Chair ladders, each 2 00 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
Montreal. 

LANTERNS Per doz. 

Short Globe, doz $12 50 

Jap'd Dash, doz 15 00 

Search Dash, doz. X-ray. 15.75-16. 10 

Little Bobs $2.10-«'l " 

Copper, well japd., doz 18.25 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton. London. 
Montreal. 

LANTERN GLOBES Dozen 

Cold blast, short 95c-$1.10 

Cold blast 95c-$l.lf) 

3 doz. cases. 85-90c doz. ; 6 doz. 
cases, 85c dozen. 

Cold blast, short ruby 4.00-4.20 

Cold blast, common ruby. 4.00-4.2" 
I Less 5c a doz. in 6 doz. lots. 
F.o.b. Toronto, London. Hamilton 
and Montreal. 
LATCHES 

Steel Thumb. No. 2. per doz. 1 90 
Steel Thumb. No. 3. per doz. 2 60 
ptppl Tbiimb '«rn, 4. per doz. 4 70 
Barn Door, No. 5, per doz. 2 75 

Barn Door, No. 9, doz 5 10 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London. 

LEAD 



For pig lead and lead an^ zinc 


products see weekly report. 




MACHINES (WASHING) 




List Each 


Canadian 


9 on 


Dowswrell 


<) no 


Noiseless 


15 50 




11 on 


Snowball 


15 00 


Momentum 


i« Kn 


New Century, styl" A 


Ifi 50 


New Century, style B 


1R 01 


Playtime, engine drive 


19 5n 


Ideal Power 


?» nn 


Seafonm. electric 


102 nn 


Seafoam, engine drive 


n nn 


NexT Idea electri** 


134 nn 




)) 5n 


Popular, No. 1 


9 5n 




11 50 


Champion 


17 00 


New Flxeell-All 


18 00 


Blue Bell, without stand 


16 50 


Puritan Water Motor Wash- 




er, complete 


28 00 


Hydro, One Tub, engine drive 


45 50 


Low pressure water motor 




washer, each 


30 00 


Connor ball-bearing, with rack 


18 6« 


I X L 


18 fiO 



Gem 16 50 

Winner, plain 13 50 

Connor Improved 9 00 

Jubilee 15 00 

Canada First 19 00 

Discount, 30% and 10%. Freight 
equalized with Montreal, Ottawa, 
Toronto, Hamilton, Kingston, Lon- 
don and St. Mary's on shipments of 
quarter dozen and upwards. 

MALLETS Per doz 

Tinsmiths, 2% x 6% in.$1.00-$1.75 

Carpenters', No. 3 5.80 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton 

MATTOCKS 

Cutter, doz $12 00 $12 50 

Pick doz 12 00 12 50 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London, 
Hamilton. 

MIXERS, BREAD 

Universal — 

No. 4, doz $34 65 

No. 8, doz 39 60 

MOPS 

Mops, 0-Codar, doz. net $12 00 

Sprustex, No. 2, doz $8 00 8 40 

S.W. Mops, complete, doz. 4 25-4 85 

Mop Sticks, doz.. No. 8 1 56-1 85 

Cast Head Mop, doz 1 90-2 00 

Crescent, doz 3 10 

Crank wringing, doz 6 25 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. Hamilton. 

London. 
MOWERS, LAWN 

Adanac 689i 

Woodyatt 40% 

Empress 40% 

Mayflower 40% ' 

Star, Ontario, Daisy 409^ 

F.o.b. Toronto. Guelph. London. 

NAILS 

List adopted July 10, 1912. 
Advances over base on common 
wire nails in kegs. 

2% inch 15c 

1 inch $1 3 inch 10c 

11/^ inch 1 3% inch 10c 

114 inch 65c 3% inch lOe 

li^ inch 40c 4 inch 5c 

1% inch 40c 4% inch 5c 

2 inch 30c 5 inch base. 

2Vi inch 30c 5V4 inch base. 

2% inch 15c 6 inch base. 

6V2 to 12 inch-2 Ga. and heavier. 
25c over base. 

Standard Steel Wire Nails, f.o.b 
Toronto, London, Hamilton, MiHon 
$5.30 base. 

Freight equalized on above points 

F.o.b. Montreal, Gananoque, C«l- 
lingwood and Owen Sound, $5.35 
base. 

Freight equalized on above points. 

Windsor, Walkerville, Sandwich 
fo.b. factory points, carload freighl 
allowed, $5,421/2 • 

Sault Ste. Marie, Port Arthur. 
Fort William, $5.05-$5.35 base, 
t.o.b. factory ; no freight allowance 

Moulding, Flooring, Slating, Box. 
Fence, Barrel Nails, 25c per 100 
lbs. over common nail price. Fin- 
ishing Nails, 60c per 100 lbs. ad- 
vance over common nail price 
Clinch Nails and Sash Pins. 76c per 
100 lbs. over conunon nail price. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, 80% ofl 
miscellaneous list, f.o.b. Toronto. 
Montreal. Hamilton. London. 

Cut Nails— Montreal, $6.70 base: 
Toronto, $5.66 base; London, $B.IO; 
Hamilton, $6.66. No eqaaliiatlMi •! 
freights. 

Roofing Nails — American, large 
head, keg, $9.00. London, $10.00. 
F.o b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. 
London. 

NAILS (HORSE) 

C Brand 
Size 

Capewell— Per 100 lbs. 

No. 5 $22 00 

No. 6 21 00 

No. 7 20 00 

No. 8 19 00 

No. 9 and up 18 00 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



63 




Business 

Building 

Qualities 

plus Big Profits 



True in 
quality since 

1858, 
improved with 
progressive 
invention 
and chemical 
genius 

THAT CUSTOMER OF YOURS, THAT ASKS FOR 

JAMIESON'S PAINT 

He Knows 

THAT IF BETTER PAINT COULD BE MADE 

Jamieson's 

WOULD MAKE IT; TO THE BETTER SERVE THE 
BEGINNER AS WELL AS THE SHREWD OLD VETERAN 

PAINTER 

Ask the dealer who sells J ami e son'' s 



R. C. JAMIESON & CO., Limited, Montreal, Canada 

ESTABLISHED 1858 
CALGARY Owning and Operating P. D. DODS & CO., LIMITED VANCOUVER 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



64 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, mS 



'■M.B.M." BRAND 

Net Price List Per box 

*•• Lengths of 25 Ibe. 

> 1%" $19 00 

* 1%" 9 00 

6 1 15-16" 4 00 

« 2%" 3 75 

7 2 5-16" 3 60 

« 2W 3 50 

9 2 11-16" 3 25 

" 2%" 3 25 

4 3 1-16" 3 25 

«„ • • • 5V4," 3 26 

F.o.b. London, Hamilt«n, Mon- 
treal. Toronto 

NETTING, POULTRY 

List prices per roll of 50 lineal 
^ardt. Adopted March, 1909. 

2-inch mesh and 19 ga. wire 
12 inch...$l 80 48 inch...$ 6 20 
18 inch... 2 65 60 inch.. 7 70 
24 inch... 3 40 72 inch... 9 20 
30 inch... 4 00 84 inch... 10 50 
36 inch... 4 75 96 inch... 12 00 
42 inch. . . 5 50 

1% inch mesh and 19 pa. wire 
12 inch... $3 50 42 inch... $10 50 
18 inch... 5 00 48 inch... 12 00 
24 inch... 6 30 60 inch... 15 00 
30 inch... 7 75 72 inch... 18 00 
36 inch.. . 9 90 

1 inch mesh and 20 ga. wire 
12 inch... $4 00 42 inch... $12 00 
18 inch... 5 60 48 inch... 14 00 
24 inch... 7 00 60 inch... 17 00 
30 inch... 8 50 72 inch... 20 00 

% inch mesh and 20 ga. wire 
24 inch... 10 50 36 inch... 515 00 
30 inch. . . 12 75 

% inch mesh and 22 ga. wire 
24 inch... $16 50 36 inch... $24 00 
30 inch... 20 10 

Discoants at present quoted ap- 
ply only to 1 and Z inch meah net- 
ting. Other prieea have been wlth- 
di-Hwn and are quoted only on ap- 
plication. 

Toronto. London, Canadian net^ 
ting 15% oflf list. 

Montreal, 16% off list. 

American netting, 10% off lUt. 

, ■ - . Per rod 

Tnyinetble— 1849 $ 76 

1848 9 85 

8060 95 

Put up in 10. 20 and 30-rod rolls. 

F.o.b. Montreal. 
OAKUM 

Best (American) $21 00 

U.S. Navy (unspun) 

Clipper (spun) 21 00 

Clipper (unsnun) 19 50 

U.S. Navy, Eng., (unspun) 

V.S. Navy. Eng., (snun) 

Plumbers (spun) $8 00 $10 50 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto 

**^^ Montreal Toronto 

Royalite 19 9 18 

Palacine 22 21 

Gasoline, gal 34 33 

Black oil (Summer). 16 15 
Black oil (Winter) . . 18 I514 

Imperial Cylinder 661/ 

Capital cylinder 50% isil 

Machine oil, regular 

erades 25y2-42 26V4-3614 

Standard gas engine 

oil 38 V^ 421/4 

Paraffine 21 24 

XXX machine 24i/i SSV^ 

Fuel oil, bbls 14^ 13% 

Fuel oil, tank cars.. 13 ' 12 

OLD MATERIALS 

See weekly report. 

PACKING Perlh. 

Fine jute $0 20 

Coarse jute 15 

Hemp 34 

Square braided hemp 38 

No. 1 Italian 44 

No. 2 Italian 36 

F.o.b. Montreal and Toronto. 
''APER Per 400-ft. roll 

Dry Fibre, No. 1 roll 1 10 

Dry Fibre, No. 2 roll 69 

Anchor Brand 1 ig 

Glased rheetinr 69 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1 roll 1 25 

Tarred Fibre, No. 2, roll 72 

Surprise Fibre 66 

Tarred felt, per cwt 3.30-3.45 

Cyclone (dry) 1 10 

Cyclone (tarred) 1 25 

Joliet (dry fibre) 59 

Monarch Sheathing (per 

100 lbs.) 4 00 



Asbestos sheeting (per 100 

lbs.) 12 . 14 

Carpet Felt, 16 oz., per 

10 lbs $4 50 $5 50 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don, Montreal, freight equalized 
thereon. 
PICKS— 
Clay— 
6 to 6 lbs., doz $10 75 $11 80 

6 to 7 lbs., doz 11 50 12 60 

7 to 8 lbs., doz 12 25 13 50 

Rock— 

1 10 8 lbs., doz 12 25 

F.o.b. Montreal and Toronto. 
PINS, CLOTHES 

Per case 

5 gross, 4-in. (loose) 95c-$1.10 

4 gross (cartons), 4%-in $1.00 

F.o.b. Montreal and Toronto. 

NEW SCHEDULE OF PRICES ON 

WROUGHT IRON PIPE 

Price List No. 36 

Black Galvanized 



Standard 



Per 100 feet 
Buttweld 



V, 


in 


% 


in 


1 


in 


m 


in 


11., 


in 


2 


in 


91., 


m 



$ 6 00 
5 22 

5 22 

6 63 
8 40 

12 i\ 
16 79 
20 08 
27 01 
43 29 
56 61 
71 76 
85 02 
Lapweld 



$ 8 00 

7 35 

7 35 

8 20 
10 52 

15 ;^'^ 

21 or, 

25 16 

33 86 

54 11 

70 76 

88 78 

105 19 



Standard 

2 in 29 97 36 45 

2V> in 45 05 55 28 

3 in 58 91 72 29 

31.. in 73 60 91 54 

4 in 87 20 108 45 

4' , in 99 06 123 82 

5 in 115 40 144 SO 

6 in 149 80 187 20 

7 in 195 20 243 95 

8 L in 205 00 256 25 

8 in 236 20 295 20 

9 in 282 90 353 25 

10 L in 2S2 40 328 00 

10 in 337 80 422 30 

Terms 2'/( 30 days, approved 
credit. 

Freight equalized on Chatham, 
Guelph, Hamilton, London, Mont- 
real, Toronto, Welland. 

While the foregoing prices on iron 
pipe are the nominal prices, it has 
been found in practice that prospec- 
tive buyers should ask for quota- 
tions on sizes 2% inches and larger 
on account of the shortage of these 
sizes and the extra difficulty of 
procuring supplies. 
WROUGHT NIPPLES 

4" and under, 45%. 

4%" and larger, 40%. 

4' and under. running thread 
25%. 

Standard couplings, 4" and un- 
der, 36%. 

iVi" and larger, 15%. 

Terms 2% 80 days. Approved 
credit, Ontario, Quebec and Mari- 
time Provinces. 
PIPE (Conductor) 

Plain List 

? In., In 10-ft. lengths, list $8 00 
S In., in 10-ft. lengths, list 9 70 

4 in.. In 10-ft. lengths, list 12 80 

5 in., in 10-ft. lengths, list 17 50 

6 In., in 10-ft. lengths, list 21 SO 

Discount 10%. 
F oh. Toronto. Ottawa, Oshawa 
PIPE, LEAD 

See weekly report 
PIPE (SOIL) 

Montreal Toronto 
% % 

Medium and extra 

heavy, 6" and under 35, 2% 30 

8" soil pipe 30 25 

Medium and extra 
heavy fittings, 6" 

and under 40, 2% 40 

PIPE (STOVE) 

See priees under Wares, etc. 
PITCH 

Pine, black, per bbl 4 75 

Navy pitch, per bbl 6 60 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
POLISH (O-Cedar) 
4-oz. hot+l<»ji. doz f ■* '^'* 

la-OK bottle*, dos.... tn 



l-qt can, doi 15 00 

%-gal. cans, doi 24 00 

1-gal. cans, dor 36 00 

Discount, 33 1-3 per eent. 

Liquid Veneer — 

4 oz., doz $2 00 

12 oz.. doz 4 00 

32 oz., doz 8 40 

64 oz., each 1 20 

128 oz., each 2 10 

F.o.b. Toronto, London. 
PUMPS 

Pumps, Well 

Cistern Pumps 

Set Lengths 

Brass Lined Cylinders 

Brass Body Cylinders 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 

London. 
RIVETS AND BURRS 

Iron rivets, blacked and tinned, 
25% ; Iron Burrs, 25%. 

Copper rivets, usual proportion 
of burrs, add 30% ; burrs, add 50%. 

Extras on Copper Rivets, Mi-Ib. 
pkgs., Ic per lb. ; %-lb. pkgs., 2c 
lb. Coppered Rivets, net extras, 3c 
per lb. 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London. 
ROOFING Per square 

Samson, 1-pIy, roll 1 90 

Samson, 2-ply, roll 2 50 

Samson, 3-ply, roll 3 10 

R. S. Special, 1-ply 1 25 

R. S. Special, 2-ply 1 BO 

R. S. Special. 8-ply 1 75 

Amazon, 1-ply 1 95 

Amazon, 2-ply 2 25 

Amazon, 3-ply 2 55 

Everlastic, 1-ply 1 65 

Everlastic, 2-pIy 1 95 

Everlastic. 3-ply 2 25 

Good Lnck, 1-pIy 1 60 

Good Luck, 2-ply 1 80 

flood Luck, 3-ply 2 10 

McCombe Sp., 1-ply 1 35 

AlcCombe Sp., 2-ply 1 65 

'^'cCombe Sp., 3-ply 1 75 

Black Cat, 1-pIy 1 85 

Rlack Cat, 2-ply 2 15 

"'ack Cat, S-ply 2 45 

B'ack Diamond tarred felt... 3 30 
Blick Diamond Ready Roofing, 

2 pl.v 1 12 

Black Diamond Ready Roofing, 

3 ply 1 S8 

Tyiquid roofing cement, per gal. 

in barrels 27 

5 and 10 gal. lots, per gal... 38 

Coal Tar, bbl $5.76-$6.00 

Roofing Pitch, $1.06 to $1.10 cwt. 
F.o.b. Toronto, London, Montreal. 
ROPE Lb. 

Pure Manila basis 39 

'British Manila basis 33 

New Zealand hemp basis 33 

Sisal basis 27% 

Above quotations are basis prices 
% and larger diameter. The fol- 
lowing advances over basis are 
made for smaller sizes : — Smaller 
than % and down to 7/16 dia. — l<.c 
above basis ; % dia.. le above basis : 
V, and B/16 dia. l%e above basis: 
3 '16 dia.. 2c above basis. 

Single lath yam basis 27% 

Double lath yarn 28 

■^•"cht marline, tarred 57 

Halyards 50 

"^"mp, deep sea line basis .... 60 
""mn. tarred ratline basis..., 43 
TTemn. tarred bolt rope basis. 45 

'Airline and Houseline 46 

T*-ilian rone basis.. On anplication 

Totton. % in 73 77 

5-32 in 72 751-?, 

"-16 in 69 72V, 

K in. and up 68 71U 

F.o.b. Toronto. Montreal. Brantford. 

London, Hamilton. 
°\NnPAPER 

B. & A. sandpaper, 10% to 15% 
"n list. 
B. & A. emery cloth, 5% on list. 

B. & A. sandnaper in rolls. 88 1-3 
—"r cent, on list. F.o.b. Toronto. 
^'ontreal. 

SCALES Scale Stamning 

ChamT^^on — T,i«t eTtra 

4 lb $ 5 50 $0 ?0 

10 lb 7 50 30 

?40 lb 12 50 50 

ROO lb 28 00 1 on 

TOO lb 35 00 1 on 

2000 lb 50 00 1 no 

?n00 lb. Drop lever 57 00 1 00 

•1 iVi. TTouoohoM . 5 00 in 

'';"' ■Frmi«<.h/>M fi on I) •>!> 

Champion list prices subject to s 
discount of 10% ; Standard scales. 



20% discount; Weigh Beams, 10% 
discount. No discount allowed on 
stamping charge. F.o.b. Toronto, 
Montreal, Hamilton. 
SCYTHES Doa. 

Cast Steel IK i* 

C^lden Clipper IS it 

Little Giant 14 M 

Little Giant, Genuine 16 H 

F.o.b. Toronto, London 
SNATHS Doz. 

00 Patent $12 50 

1 12 00 

2 11 50 

3 10 50 

SCREWS 

Discounts off Standard List adopted 
Aug. 1, 1903. 

Wood, F. H., bright 7»H 

Wood, R. H., bright 61*i 

Wood, O. H., bright 67V 

Wood, F. H., brass 91^' 

Wood, R. H., brass 82J5 

Wood, O. H., brass 82»i 

Wood, F. H., bronze VIM, 

Wood, R. H., broiise 26 

Wood, O. H., broiiie Z^ 

Square cap 20 

Hexagon cap 20 

F.o.b. Toronto, HamlltoB, Londo. 
and Montreal. 

Weeden Bench 8«rew« 

Dozen f •* 

SHEETS, BLACK 

See Montreal and Toronto report 
S.HEETS, CORRUGATED 

See weekly I'eport. 
SHEETS, GALVANIZED 

Premier Galvanized 

Per ■"*" "■^" 

10% oz $9 50 

U.S 28 9 20 ■ 

U.S. 26 8 90 

22 and 24 8 7o 

18 and 20 » •'0 

16 8 45 

14 835 

F.o.b. Hamilton and Toronto 

Colborne Crown — 16-20 gauge 

$12.55; 22-24 gauge. $12.75. 2«- 

eauge, $13 ; 28 gauge, $13.25. l-es« 

25c in cash lots. F.o.b. Montreal. 

Apollo Brand Montreal Toronto 

14 gauge $12 05 $ 8 10 

16 gauge 12 <» $ JO 

18-20 gauge 10 30 8 86 

22-24 gauge 10 45 8 6' 

26 gauge * J^ 

28 gauge ..••• | »5 

10% ozs 11 W 9 25 

Add 20c for less than ton lots. 
B W. Queen's Flenr- Oorbals 
.ronge Head d»-Lta "be-*-»<— " 

16 $12 55 $12 55 

m 00 12 55 12 55 

22-'>4 12 25 12 25 

26 12 25 12 25 

28 13 00 13 00 

Less 26c In ease lots. 
F.o.b. Montreal. 
SHINGLES *"" •" 

Standard galvanized $11 00 

Shipping weight, »• Ihs 

Standard painted 8 5Q 

Shipping weight. 80 Ibe. 
Discount 7%%. 
Fob. Toronto. Ottawa, 0«V«wT^ 
SIDING METAL 

Standard galvanized $9 ?» 

Standard painted " oO 

Discount 7%*. 
F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto, Ottawa. 
Oshawa. 
SOI.DERING COPPERS 

Base. 3-8 lbs.. 64c lb. F.o.b To- 
ronto and Hamilton. 
SOLDER. BAR 

gee Weekly Report. 
STAPLES 

See Wire Products. 
STOVES 

Oil Bnmlnr Cooking " ■' 

Perfection 2-bumer *T '' 

Perfection 3-bumer *1* ** 

Perfection 4-burner Ji •• 

No. 22G oven for above stoves 5 M 
M(iClary Glass Front Oveii 

No. 70 4 25 

Detroit Glass Front Oven No. 

85 4 50 

F.o.b. Samia. London. Tornnt- 
Ottawa 
Oil Burning Heaters. LWt 

No. 525 (125), each «M 

No. 530 (130). each 1 »8 

No. 630 (230). each • t» 

F.o.b. Toronto, Sam la, London. 

Hamilton. Ottawa. 

Discount 25% off Hst. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



65 



Famous Wherever They are Sold for Quality 
and Service Ability 

Morrison Brass Goods and Lawn Supplies 
are particularly seasonable and popular 
lines for selling RIGHT NOW. 

Insure yourself against the usual dull spell 
in your Brass Goods department this season 
by sending us your order at once for a sup- 
ply of these two fast-selling lines. 






James Morrison Brass Mfg, Co. 

Limited 
93-97 Adelaide Street West 

TORONTO 
CANADA 




YOU'LL MAKE MONEY ON THESE 
BECAUSE— 

BLACK DIAMOND Tarred Felt 
JOLIETTE and CYCLONE Brands 
Sheathings, Roofings and all lines of Build- 
ing Paper are of the best material and sure 
to secure repeat orders. 

Saves money for your customers. They'll reciprocate — by giving you their business in other lines. 

We also sell you wrapping papers of all descriptions. 

All kinds of Sheathing made at our own mills. Our reputation is behind all these Brands. 

ALEX. McARTHUR & COMPANY, LIMITED 

82 McGILL STREET, MONTREAL 





The Oribo Mfg. Co., Limited, Winnipeg, is our Sole Selling 
Agent for the Northwest Provinces 




D 
] 
O3 



The Best Quality of Genuine Dry 
Red Lead and Genuine Dry Powdered Litharge 

Paper manufacturers want a Red Lead to protect their steam and water pipes, and a Litharge to reline their digesters. 
Rubber and Color Makers need them. Shipbuilding firms must have them. Railways and Ironworks use them. 

Are you ready to supply the requirements of such firms in y^ur district. Also 

YOUR PAINTER 

must have Genuine Red Lead and Litharge to meet his requirements. Do not delay in putting in a stock or you will lose 
good business which is rightly yours. 

The Carter White Lead Co. of Canada, Limited, 91 Delorimier Avenue, Montreal 

trscnc 



jt 



JC=3 I II IE 



ir 



3C^g^g^g"^ i ■» T — '■ — i r 



If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



SPADES, SHOVELS AND SCOOPS 

1st Grade 2nd Grade 4th Graa^ 

Plain Back Shovels and Spades 50% 50% 50% 

Draining Tools 50% 50% 

Hollow Back Scoops 50% 50% 

Sand Shovels 50% 50% 

Hollow Back Shovels 50% 50% 

Hollow Back Coal Shovels 50% 50% 

Riveted Back Scoops 50% 50% 50% 

Miners' Spring Point Shovels 50% .... .... 

Above discounts apply whether goods are sold in carload or less 
than carloads. 

The above discounts apply only to Black List; Black List prices 
being as follows : 

BLACK LIST PRICES 
Plain Back Shovels and Spades.. $29.00 $28.00 $25.00 

Draining Tools, No. 2, black 29.00 27.50 

Hollow Back Scoops, No. 2, black, 34.50 32.00 

Coal Shovels, Hollow Back, No. 2, 

black 32.00 30.00 

Sand Shovels, No. 2, black 27.50 24.00 

Hollow Back Shovels, No. 2, black 27.50 24.00 

Riveted Back Scoops, No. 2 black 37.50 35.50 34.00 

Miners' Spring Point Shovel, No. 2, 

black 36.50 .... 

NET EXTRAS— 

For each size larger than No. 2, add 25c dozen net. 

Full polished $1.00 per dozen net 

Half polished 50c per dozen net 

F.o.b. London, Hamilton, Toronto, Gananoque, Ottawa, Montreal, 
Quebec, Halifax, St. John, Moncton, and freight may be equalized 
thereon. 



SWEEPERS, CARPET Bissell's 
Doz. 
American Queen, Nickeled 
Fittings, Cyco Ball Bear- 
ing $43 00 

Boudoir, Nic, Cyco B.B 40 00 

Club, Jap. Cyco Bearing .... 96 00 
Champion, Nickeled Fittings 35 00 
Champion, Japanned Fittings 31 00 

Elite, Nic, Cyco B.B 46 00 

Grand, Nic. ,Cyco B.B 56 00 

Grand, Jap., Cyco B.B 52 00 

Grand Rapids, Nic, Cyco 

B.B 40 00 

Grand Rapids, Jap., Cyco B.B 36 00 
Parlor Queen, Nic, Cyco, 

B.B 46 00 

Princess, Nic, Cyco B.B... 41 00 
Standard, Nickeled Fittings 37 00 
Standard, Japanned Fittings 33 00 
Universal, Nic, Cyco Bear- 
ing 38 00 

Universal, Jap., Cyco Bear- 
ing 34 00 

SWEEPERS, VACUUM Bissell's 
Doz. 

Grand Rapids, Nic $84 00 

Household, Jap 72 00 

Superba, Nic 99 00 

F.o.b. factory Niagara Falls, Ont., 
and other jobbing points in Eastern 
Canada. 

SWEEPERS (ELECTRIC) 

Steel frame S3 75 

Aluminum frame 41 25 

Attachments, set 7 BO 

F.o.b Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
TACKS Discount 

Wire Tacks 69 and 10% 

Revised Hardware Tack 

List adopted Jan. 1, 

1916 60 and 15% 

Double pointed tacks.... 60 10% 

Shoe findings list adopted 

July 5, 1917— Net list. 

List of Capped Goods 

adopted Jan. 1, 1916.. 60 snd 15% 
F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, Montreal, 

London. 
TINNERS' TRIMMINGS 

See prices under head of Wires. 
TOASTERS, ELECTRIC 

Upright, with rack $4 00 

TOOLS, HARVEST 

Waverly, Wellandvale. iiixford 
Maple Leaf, Bedford, 17%_% dis- 
count. Samson, 12%% discount. 
?.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. 

London. 
TROUGH (EAVE) 
O. G. Square bead and half round. 
Size in girth Per 100 ft. 

8 in $ 6 90 15 in $12 50 

10 in 7 70 18 in 16 00 

12 in 9 10 Discount 10%. 

F.o.b. Toronto. Oshawa. OttawM 
TRAPS (GAME) Doz. with chain 

Victor, No. 1 2 20 

Jump, No. 1 2 95 

Hawley & Norton, No. 1 3 45 , 

Newhouse, No. 1 4 70 

F.o.b. Toronto. London. Hamilton 
Montreal. 
TWINE (BINDER) Pei h 

500 ft $0 23V2 

550 ft 25% 

600 ft 261,4 

650 ft 28 

In 5-ton lota 14c discount from 



above; 10 tons and upwards. V4c 
discount. Freight paid on 300 lbs. 
and over to nearest station. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. Brant- 
ford, Hamilton, London 
TWINE (COTTON) 

3-ply wrapping, lb 69-72 

4-ply, wrapping, lb 73-76 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
WOOD TUBS 

No. 0, per dozen $23 50 

No. 1, per dozen 21 50 

No. 2, per dozen 15 40 

No. 3, per dozen 15 00 

F.o.b. Newmarket 
VALVES % 

Ground work 42 

Compression work, standard.. 47 

High gr?do 41 

Cushion work 40 

Fuller work, standard 45 

High grade SS 

Basin cocks. No. Standard.. 40 

High grade 40 

Bath cocks .'0 

Fiatway stop and waste cocks, 

sta ndard 50 

Hijch fr.ide 47 

Roundway stop and waste 

cocks, standard SO 

High grade 47 

Brass steam cocks, standard. 

10% advance on list 
Radiator valves, standard.... 10 

High grade Net 

Patent quick opening valves. 30 
Globe, angle and check valves, 

standard Net 

Do., Jenkins Disc, 5% advance 
on list 
F.o.b. Toronto 
WARES. ETC. 
Scotch Grey Ware, 50, 5%. 
Colonial. 33 1-3%. 
Imperial Ware. 33 1-3%. 
Pearl. 33 1-3%. 
Premier, 10%. 
Canada Ware, 10%. 
Diamond, 10%. White Ware, 50%. 
Japanned Ware, list plus 20%. 
Japanned Wiire. White, list, plus 

30%. 
Plain and Jap Spiinklers, list plus 

20%. 
Stamped Ware, plain. 50%. 
Stamped Ware, retinned. 45%. 
Copper Bottoms, list, plus 10%. 
Tinners' Trimmings, plain, 50%. 
Tinners' Trimmings, retinned, 45%. 
Tinners' Trimmings, general, list 

plus 10%. 
Factory Milk Cans, list plus 50%. 
Milk Can Trimmings, list, plus 

60%. 
Oream Cans, list .plus 25%. 
Railroad Cans, list, plus 20%. 
Pieced Tinware, C.B., list, plus 

•50%,. 
Sheet Iron Ware. list, plus 10%. 
Pieced Ware, ordinary, list, plus 

30%. Fry Pans. 40 and 10%. 

Spiders, steel. 10% ; cast iron, 
17%%. 

Fire Shovels. Japanned, list, plus 
10%. 

«teel Sinks, painted, list, plus lO'v?^ 
Steel Sinks, galvanized, list plus 

1K%. 
Light Galv. Pails and Tubs, list 
plus 10%, 



Heavy Galv. Pails and Tubs, list, 

plus 10%. 
Garbage Pails, list, plus 10%. 
Jap. Coal Hods, list, plus 25%. 
Galv. Coal Hods, list, plus 40%. 
Paper Lined Boards, 40 and 5%. 
Wood Lined Boards, 30 and 10%. 
Stove Pipe, patent, per 100, 6 in., 

$20.36 ; 7 in., $21.83. 
Common, made-up, per 100, 5 and 6 

in., $21.00; 7 in., $23.00. 
Polished, made-up, per 100, 5 and 

6 in.. $23.00; 7in., $25.00. 
Stove Pipe Thimbles, 50, 10%. 
Copper Boilers, list, plus 10%. 
Copper Tea Kettles, list, plus 10'^. 
Copper Tea Kettles, 3 doz. lots, list. 

plus 10%, less 10%. 
Copper Tea and Coffee Pots. list. 

plus 10%. 
Copper Tea and Coffee Pots, in 3 

doz. lots, list, plus 10%, less 109(. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London. 

Hamilton. 
WASHERS, IRON 

Full box, 10% on list. Net prices 
per 100 lbs.: % in., $21.80; 5-16 in., 
$18.50; % in., $16.30; 7-16 in.. 
$13.55; V2 in., $13; 9-16 in., $12.15; 
% in., $11.70; 11-16 in., $11; 13-16 
in., $11.70; 15-16, $11.70; 17-16 in., 
$11.70; 50 lbs. of one size, $2 per 
100 lbs. less. 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London 
WEIGHTS, SASH 

Tor'to Lond'n Mont'l 
Sectional, 1 lb. 

per 100 lbs... $5 50 $5 50 $5 35 
Section, y> in. 

per 100 lbs... 5 50 5 50 5 50 
Solid. 3 to 30 

lbs., per cwt.. 3 90 4 00 4 00 
WHEELBARROWS 
Navvy, steel wheel, doz. .37.50-51.50 
Garden steel wheel, doz. 61. 00-75. 00 

Light garden, doz 37.00-54.00 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto, London. 
WIRE PRODUCTS 
F.o.b. Toronto, London, Hamilton. 

Montreal 
Cut Hay Baling Wire Per 100 lbs. 

No. 9 $6 60 

No. 10 6 65 

No. 11 6 70 

No. 12 6 85 

Mo. 13 6 95 

No. 13V2 6 95 

No. 14 7 1.C 

No. 15 7 35 

Stovepipe Wire 

No. 18 8 25 

No. 19 8 75 

Hay Wire in Coils 

No. 13 6 80 

No. 14 6 90 

No. 15 7 05 

No. 16 7 20 

Smooth Steel Wire. 
Nos. 0-9 gauge, base 6 25 

Extras over base sizes on smaller 
gauges are as follows : 

No. 10, 6c extra ; No. 11, 12c ; No. 
12, 30c; No. 13. 30c; No. 14, 40c; 
No. 15, 55c : No. 16. 70c extra. 

Extra net per 100 lbs. — Oiled wire. 
10c; spring wire, $2.50; bright, soft 
drawn, 15c; charcoal (extra quali- 
ty), $1.25; packed in casks or cases, 
15c; bagging and paperings, 10c: 
50 and 100-lb. coils, in 25-lb. coils. 
15c ; in 5 and 10-lb. coils. 25c ; in 
1-lb. coils, 50c: in %-lb. coils, 75c: 
in %-lb. coils, $1. 

Fine Steel Wire 

List Price on Fine Steel Wire 

No. 17 $5 00 No. 26 $ 9 50 

No. 18 5 50 No. 27 10 00 

No. 19 6 00 No. 28 11 00 

No. 20 6 65 No. 29 12 00 

No. 21 7 00 No. 30 13 0(' 

No. 22 7 30 No. 31 14 00 

No. 23 7 65 No. 32 15 00 

No. 24 8 00 No. 33 16 00 

No. 25 9 00 No. 34 17 On 

For prices of fine steel wire add 
45% to above list. 

Extra net 

List of extras in 100-lb. lots, net 

Tinned wire, Nos. 17-25 $3 on 

Nos. 26-31 •'5 00 

Nos. 32-34 7 no 

Coppered 7" 

Oiling in 

Tn 25-lb. bund'ps 1 S 

Tn 5 and 10-lh. bundles... 2S 

Tn 1-lb. hnnks 25 

In l/^-lb. hanks 28 

Tn %-lb. hanks ,50 

■""cked in casks or cases.... 15 
Rneging or pai)eringr 16 



Oiled and Annealed Wire 

No. 10 $6 46 

No. 11 6 47 

No. 12 6 65 

Wire Bale Ties 

No. 12 $ 75 

No. 13 6 85 

No. 131/3 6 90 

No. 14 7 00 

No. 15 7 20 

No. 16 7 45 

Fence Wire. Toronto 

Barb ; $6.25-$6.50 

No. 9 pi. glav 5.35-6.00 

No. 12 pi. galv 5.50- 6.15 

No 13 pi. galv 6.00-6.25 

No. 9 coil sp 5.50-6.00 

No. 12 coil sp 5.80- 6.25 

Quotations are at times made on 
wire at lower figures than the gen- 
eral market by jobbers having large 
stocks to dispose of. 

Fence Staples 

Fence staples, bright $6 50 

Fence staples, galvanized. $6.26-6.50 

In 25-lb. boxes add 25c extra 
Poultry Netting Staples 
Poultry netting staples, gal- 
vanized, list $12 00 

Less discount of 12'Y2%- 

Bright poultry netting staples 
$1.10 less than galvanized after dis- 
count has been made. 

Copper and Brass Wire 

Copper wire list, plus 10% 

Brass wire, 3 to 24 gauge, add 40% 

25 to 36 gauge, add 25% 

Wire Cloth 
Black Fly Screen Cloth, per 

100 BO. ft. in 100-ft. rolls... $3 50 

In 50-ft. rolls 3 55 

Galvanized, per 100 sq. ft. in 

100 ft. rolls 4 75 5 50 

Bronze, sq. ft 14 

F.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 
Wire Goods 

Discounts apply to list adopted 
Nov. 20, 1916. 
Bright Screw Eyes Suits, 

A.B.C.M 82%% 

Bright Iron Gate Hooks and 

eyes 82%% 

Bright square cornered 

screw hooks, and stove 

pipe eyes 82%% 

Brass, screw eyes suits, 

A.B.C 70% 

Brass Screw Hooks 70% 

Brass Gate Hooks and eyes 70% 

F.o.b. Toronto, Montreal, London, 
Hamilton. 
WRINGERS 
Royal Can., 11 in., doz. list $84 72 

Eze, 11 in., per doz 91 80 

Trojan, 12 inch 185 00 

Favorite 511E 106 80 

Unexcelled, 1041E 129 60 

Easy Work 90 50 

Challenge, 3111E 94 30 

Gem, 141E 91 80 

Sunlight, lllE 82 80 

Ottawa, 341E 103 30 

Empire, 11 in 93 80 

Superior, 11 in 84 80 

Majestic, 11 in 88 OC 

Perfect, 11 in 97 50 

Hicycle, 11 in 103 30 

Daisy, No. 2 114 72 

Daisy, No. 1 105 84 

Maple Leaf No. 2 103 20 

Maple Leaf No. 1 94 32 

Sun 78 90 

Rapid 82 80 

Universal 63 00 

Eureka, 10 in 65 00 

Eureka, 11 in 71 00 

Eclipse 97 70 

Discount off above list, 30% and 
10%. 

Freight equalized on shipments of 
Vt doz. and Mpwards on Montreal 
Toronto. Kingston. Hamilton. Lon- 
don. St. Mary's. 

For zinc products and zinc sheet* 
Cpo weekly report 
WRENCHES 
Trimo — Doss, net Doz. net 

8 in $15 60 18 in $35 00 

10 in 17 40 24 in 50 60 

14 in 24 25 

Goes — Doz. net Dot. n^* 

6 '"n $14 60 15 in $35 00 

8 in 17 50 18 in 46 60 

10 in 20 40 21 in 56 80 

12 in 26 20 

Stillson — Each Doz. net 

6 in $1 20 $14 00 

gin 1 35 15 60 

10 in 1 50 17 40 

14 in 2 10 24 45 

18 in 3 00 35 00 

24 in 4 35 50 60 

36 in 94 20 

48 in 139 20 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



67 



^. 







PLATE A21D 



EMPIRE CLOSETS 

Every Merchant Plumber is interested 
in seeing his customer get the best that 
the market affords. 

It means better profits and satisfied 
customers. 

Empire Vitreous China Closet Com- 
binations are durable, neat in appear- 
ance and silent in operation. 

Oak and Vitro Closet Outfits carried 
in stock. 

We can make prompt shipment of all 
lines of plumbing and heating ma- 
terial. 

Empire Mfg. Co., Limited 

London Toronto 



DO YOU WANT 

"BETTER BRUSHES" 

THEN WHY NOT BUY THE ONLY BRUSH MADE TO THAT STANDARD? 



( r^ n n\ Pi PA n f rA 




v^ j U UVU UVM H J 



Brushes built on a quality basis and priced on a quantity 
output. Made under modern methods, equipment and man- 
agement in the finest factory in the world devoted to the 
making of high-grade brushes. 



Makers && 



T. S. SIMMS & CO., Ltd., ., 

ST. JOHN (FAIRVILLE), N.B., CANADA 



BETTER BRUSHES" 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



68 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 191S 



Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass, Etc. 



ALABASTINE 

Colors and white — 2%-lb. pack- 
ages, $8.60 for 100 lbs. ; 5-lb. pack- 
ages, $8.40 for 100 lbs. F.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, London. 
BEESWAX Per lb. 

Small quantities $0 45 

Larger quantitias 40 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
BLUE STONE Montreal Toronto 

Per lb 18-14 14-lS 

BRONZING LIQUID 

Bronzing liquid. No. l.$l.BO-$2.00 

Banana oil, gal 3.50- 7.00 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
BRUSHES 

Acme, 15 lbs. each $2 25 

Acme, 20 lbs., each 2 75 

Acme, 25 lbs. each 3 25 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
COATING 

Cement Coating $8 00 $8 75 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
COLORS (DRY) Per lb 

Raw Umber, No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure, 100-lb. kegs 15 

Burnt Umber, No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure. 100-lb. kegs 15 

Raw Sienna, No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure, 100-lb. kegs.... 15 
Burnt Sienna. No. 1, 100-lb. 

kegs 07 

Do., pure. 100-lb. kegs.... l-l 
Imp. green, 100 lb. kegs.... 25 

Chrome green, pure 8t 

Chrome yellow 17-31 

Brunswick green, 100 lb. k. . 12 

Indian rd. 100-lb. ken IB 

Indian red. No. 1. 100 lb. k.. 06 
Venetian red. best bright. . . 04 

Venetian red. No. 1 02V6 

Drop black, pure dry 16 

Golden ochre. 100 lb. kegs.. 06^:^ 
White ochre. 100 lb. kegs . . 04 

White ochre, barrels 03 

Yellow ochre, barrels 03% 

French ochre, barrels 06 

Spruce ochre, 100-lb. kegs... 7-8c 
Canadian red oxide. bbls....2 -2% 

Super magnetic red 2%-2i4c 

Vermilion 40 

English vermilion 2 60 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. 
COLORS IN OIL, PURE 

1 lb. tins — 

Venetian red 16 

Indian red 30 

Chrome yellow, pure 53 

Golden ochre, pure 30-32 

French spruce ochre, pure.... 18 

Chrome green, pure 24-23 

French permanent green, pure 28 

Signwriters' black, pure 33 

Lampblack 3S 

Marine black, 5 lb. irons 20 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
ENAMELS (White) G»I 

Durante 6 50 

AMmglosB 6 06 

GLUE Per lb 

Brantford All Round Glue — 

Case No. 7— 50-lb. pkgs $28 00 

Case No. 8—100 %-lb. pkgs.. 31 00 
Case No. 9—200 i^-lb. pkgs. . 38 00 

Discount. 
French medal (prices withdrawn) 

English common sheet 82-34 

English prima 35-38 

White pigsfoot 50 

Cake bone. 112-lb. bags 35 

Hide. 112-lb. bags 45 

Gelatine. 112-lb. bags 45-60 

Ground glues, 112-lb. bags, 

No. 1 28-30 

Sround glue. No. 2, 112-lb. 

bags 22-24 

Do.. No. 3. less than bags . . 24 

GLASS Stmrle DouhV 

Per 100 ft. Thick TViick 

Under *B $16 80 $22 90 

86 to 84 17 60 24 8.S 

SB to 4» 18 35 26 40 

41 to BO 23 BO 30 00 

tl to «» 24 60 30 80 

n to 70 26 50 32 70 

Tl to 80 i9 70 3B 40 

81 to 85 46 4.'5 

tc to 90 4R RK 

91 to 94 49 M 

96 to 100 58 BE 



101 to 105 65 35 

106 to 110 73 10 

Discount box glass, 25%. 
Cut lights, 5-10%. Cash 2%. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, London, 

Hamilton. 
GLASS. PLATE Sq. foot 

Plates up to 1 foot, each $0 80 

Plates from 1 to 2 feet, each 90 

2 to 3 " 95 

3 to 4 " 1 15 

4 to 5 " 1 35 

5 to 7 " 1 50 
7 to 10 " 1 70 

10 to 12 " 1 75 
12 to 15 " 1 85 
15 to 25 " 1 95 
26 to 50 " 2 15 
50 to 75 " 2 20 
75 to 90 " 2 25 
90 to 100 " 2 30 
100 to 120 " 2 60 
120 to 140 " 2 90 
Plates 101 to 110 wide contain- 
ing not over 100 ft. each... 3 00 
Plates 111 to 120 wide contain- 
ing not over 100 ft., each... 3 40 
Plates 101 to 110 wide contain- 
ing over 100 ft., each 3 40 

Plates 111 to 120 wide contain- 
ing over 100 ft., each 3 75 

Trade Discount. 25%. 
City deliveries. 33 1/3%. 
Montreal, London. Hamilton, To- 
ronto. Kitchener. 
GLAZIERS' POINTS 

Zinc coated, $1.56-$1.62 per doz. 
packages 6 lbs. gross. 

Zinc, pure, prices withdrawn. 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
LEAD. WHITE (Ground in oil.) 
Prices are per 100 lbs. in ton lots. 
Less than ton lots are 35c per 
100 lbs. higher than nuoted hp- 
low. F.o.b. Ottawa. 15c advance 
per 100 lbs. F.o.b. London and 
Windsor, 30c per 100 lbs. F.o.b. 
Toronto and Hamilton. 25c per 
100 lbs. F.o.b. Fort William and 
Port Arthur, 40c per 100 lbs. 
Maritime differential 30c per 100 lbs. 
over Montreal. 

MoT'trpi-l Xornr.*o 

Anchor. Pure $17 00 $17 25 

Crown Diamond .... 17 00 17 25 

Crown, pure 17 00 17 25 

Green Seal 17 00 17 25 

RamsDy's Pure 17 00 17 2.i 

Moore's Pure 17 00 17 25 

Tiger, Pure 17 00 17 25 

O.P.W. Dec. Pure. . . 17 00 17 25 

Red .Ser.I 17 00 17 25 

Decorators' Pure ... 17 00 17 25 

O.P.W. English 17 20 17 4." 

Elephant Genuine . . 17 50 17 75 

R B. Genuine Lead, less than 
tons. $19.10 Toronto; $18.90 Mont- 
real. Ton lots 5% off ; flve-ton lots 
10% off. 

LEAD (RED DRY) 
Genuine. 560-pound 

casks, per cwt $14 00 $14 50 

Genuine. 100-pound 

kegs, per cwt 14 75 15 50 

Less quantity 16 00 17 00 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. 
LEAD, ARSENATE Dry, Paste 

Pound Pound 

Barrels, 600 lbs 24% 

Half bbls., 300 lbs 24% 

100s , 45 25 

50s 45V. 25% 

25s 46 26 

10s 47% 

5s 49% 29% 

2s 31 

Is 52 32% 

F.o.b. Toronto. Montreal and 
Hamilton 
MURESCO 

Tints, 6-lb. packages, per 100 lbs.. 
$8.40; white. 5-lb. packages. $7.80. 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
LINSEED OIL 

For prices see weekly report. 
PAINTS. PREPARED 

Price per gallon 

Rlevhant, white 3 70 

F'enhant. colors 3 4S 

B H. 'EneHsh. white S SO 

PH. English, colors 3 70 

B.H. Floor 3 05 



B.H. Porch Floor 3 70 

Minerva, white 3 80 

Minerva, colors 3 60 

Crown Diamond, white a od 

Crown Diamond, colors 3 45 

Crown Diamond, floor 2 95 

B.H. Fresconette, white 3 35 

B.H. Fresconette, colors 3 25 

Moore's House Colors, white.. 3 50 
Moore's House Colors, colors. 3 40 
Moore's Egyptian Paint, all 

colors 2 75 

Moore's Floor Paint 2 90 

Moore's Sani-Flat 3 00 

Jamieson's Crown Anchor.... 3 30 

C.P.C. Pure, white 3 80 

C.P.C. Pure, colors 3 70 

O.P.W. Canada Brand, white 3 70 
O.P.W. Canada Brand, colors 3 40 
O.P.W. Canada Brand, floor. 2 9o 

O.P.W. Flat Wall, white 3 20 

O.P.W. Flat Wall, colors 3 00 

Ramsay's Pure, white 3 65 

Ramsay's Pure, colors 3 35 

Mrrtin-Senour, 100%, white.. 3 80 
Martin-Senour, 100%. colors. 3 70 
Martin-Senour. Porch Paint. . . 3 70 
Martin-Senour, Neutone, white 3 35 
Martin-Senour, Neutone, colors 3 25 

Senour's Floor Paint 3 15 

Sherwin-Williams, white 3 80 

Sherwin-Williams, colors 3 70 

Flat Tone, white 3 35 

Flat Tone, colors 3 25 

Lowe Bros. H.S., white 3 80 

Lowe Bros. H.S., colors 3 70 

Mellotone. white 3 50 

Mellotone. colors 3 35 

Sanitone. white 3 35 

Maple Leaf, white 3 80 

Maple Leaf, colors 3 70 

Maple Leaf, floor 3 15 

Maple Leaf, fiat wall 3 25 

Pearcy's Prepared, colors .... 3 15 
Pearcy's Prepared, white .... 3 50 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. 
PARIS GREEN C.P. Bergcr's 

and Munro's 
Per lb. 
In barrels, about 600 

lbs 6O14 61 

In arsenic wegs, 250 
In 50 lb. and 100 

lb. drums 6I14 62 

In 25 lb. drums 6214 63 

In 1 lb. packets, 100 

lbs. in case 64^4 S 65 

In % lb. packets, 100 

lbs. in case 66% 67 

In 1 lb. tins, 100 lbs. 

in case 6614 67 

Above prices f.o.b. Montreal, Que- 
bec, Moncton, St. John and Hali- 
fax. Toronto, Hamilton, Londrn, 
Yarmouth and P.E.I, are 14c per 
lb. higher. Terms one month net 
or 1% in 15 days. 

Standard 
Less than tons 
PUTTY Montreal Toronto 

Bulk, in casks $4 35 4 70 

Bulk. 100-lb. drums 5 20 5 45-5 55 
Bulk 25-lb. drums. 5 20 5 55 

Bulk. 12%-lb. irons 5 20 5 80 

Bladder, in bbls. . . 5 20 5 80 

Ton lots standard are 20c per 
hundred pounds less. 

Pure Putty. $2 cwt. advance. 

London and Hamilton prices same 
as Toronto. 
ROSIN 

Barrels. 100 lbs $5 90 $6 00 

Kegs. 100 lbs 7 00 

Less, per lb 06% 08 

SHELLAC 

Pure White, gal.... $4 75-$4 90 

Pure Orange, gal - 4 50 

Gum Shellac. TN. 74-76c lb.; fin- 
est orange. 79-95c : bone dry white. 
85c. F.o.b. Toronto, London. 
PAINT AND VARNISH 
REMOVER 

Tnxite. 1 gal. cans 3 00 

B.H. Vanisher $2 75 

Cumoff 3 00 

Takof 8 25 

O.P.W. Presto 8 00 

Lingerwett 2 80-3 25 

Solvo 3 M 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
TURPENTINE 

See weekly report elsewhere in 
this issue for prieaa. 



SLATING Q.1 

Liquid Slatin?. B.B $2 2ft 

VARNISHES Per gal. eaiu 

No. 1 Furniture, extra, bar- 
rels, $1.10-$1.21 s;al. ; g»l. 

tins $1.32-»1.4»- 

B.H. Stovepipa Varntak. ^ 

pints, per dozen 1 S4 

Depend-on, list t SS 

B.H. Maritime Spar, list. ... 7 9» 

Everlastic, Depend-on and Maritfaaa 

Spar subject to discount of 40*. 

Elastilite 2 »t 

Graniline Floor Finish 2 90 

Hydrox Spar 3 6^ 

Sun Varnish 2 60> 

Sun Sp.ir 4 63 

Sun Waterproof Floor 3 4(> 

Jasperite Interior and Ex- 
terior 2 66 

Jasperite Pale Hard Oil . . . 1 »♦ 
Jasperite Indestruato Floor 

Fmish 2 H 

Jamieson's Copaline 3 tt 

M-S Marble-Ite Floor 8 29 

M-S Wood-Var 8 21 

M-S Double Spar 4 »7 

M-S Finest Interior 8 M 

Elastic Interior 2 C4 

Mar-not S it 

Quick Action House 2 47 

Rexspar 4 St' 

Sear-Not 8 24 

Kyanize Spar 4 M 

Kyanize Cabinet Rubbing .. 8 SB 

Kyanize Interior 8 8S 

Luxebcrry light 8 1^ 

Luxeberry granite 8 6* 

Luxeberry spar 4 W 

Ramsay's Universal 2 M 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. 
WATER PAINTS 

Opalite, 300 lb. bbls ISVi 

Opalite. 100 lb. kegs 14 

1 gal. packages, per pkg... 76 
% gal. package, per pkg... 40 
Coralite, 5-lb. pkgs., white 07 
Coralite, 5-lb. pkgs., colors 07^ 
B.H. Frescotn, 6 lbs. white, 

$6.50; colors 7 M 

F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. 
WASTE 

Cream. Polishing $0 21 

WHITE 

XXX 20 

XX 18 

X 17 

XC 16 

Japanese 15 

XXX Extra • 81 

X Grand • i»%. 

XLCR 18% 

X Empire 17% 

X Press e 16 

COLORED 

No. 5 15 

No. 1 14 

No. 7 13 

No. lA 11% 

No. IB 10V» 

Fancy 1«^ 

Lion IS 

Standard 18% 

Popular 11 

Keen 10% 

Above lines subject to trade dis- 
count for quantity. 
WAX Per lb. 

C. & B. Floor Wax $0 35 

B.H. Wax SB 

Ronuk Floor Wax, lb 88 

Berry Bros 84 

Imperial Floor Wax 40 

Anchor 88 

O.P.W. Lion Brand »'■ 

Old Euplish 61 62 

Johnsons 61 62 

Jamieson's liquid wax, gal... 2 78 

Gold Medal 42 

Edwards, lb 40 

Ramsay's " ^^ 

S. & W 40 

F.o.b. Montreal and Toronto. 
WHITING 

Plain, in bbls $2 Bt 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. London 

Gilders, bolted, in bbls 8 OP 

WOOD ALCOHOL . per gal. 

In tire gallons $1.80-$1.9» 

In "barrels -1.7* 

>:4 extra for barrels 
F.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. London. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



69 



RED 

s 

BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 

THE TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

DON ROADWAY TORONTO 




j;^^ijwai''irii**-- 



GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS 



ESTABLISHED 1863 

Twelve Medals of 

Award at 

INTERNATIONAL 

Expositions. 




INCORPORATED 1895 

Special Grand 

Prize 

GOLD MEDAL 

Atlanta, 1895. 



Copy of Catalogue w^ill be sent free to any interested File User upon application. 

G. & H. BARNETT COMPANY .... PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Owned and operated by Nicholsoa File Co. 



Twelve Cents 
Per Word! 

Several weeks ago a firm in 
Vancouver, B.C., telegraphed a 
want ad to Hardware and Met:)l. 
They watited a clerk in a hurry 
and wished to catch the earliest 
issue. 

The cost of a telegram from 
Vancouver to Toronto is ten 
cents per word, added to this 
was our charge of two cents per 
word. 

This firm had faith enough in 
Hardware and Metal's Want Ad 
column to pay tivelve cents per 
word, for an announcement in 
this column. This little story 
speaks for itself. Mail or wire 
your want ads, we will accept 
them until Thursday noon for 
the current issue. 

Hardware and Metal 
Want Ad Dept. 




WW 1 ;;;///;</ 

m 




ANOTHER 
MEHASCO 
MESSAGE 



8 



MAHAG WASHERS 



With every Maytag Washer goes an absolute, unlimited 
guarantee against defective material or v^orkmanship. 

The dealer is as well protected as his customer. 

We carry at all times a full line of the Maytag Washers, 
also all repairs. We can furnish the Multi-Motor, the Elec- 
tric in either 110-volt alternating current for city use, or 32- 
volt direct current to use with the lighting plants in the 
country. The Maytag Power, with wringer, and the Com- 
bination Hand and Power Machine. 

Merchants' Hardware Specialties, Limited 

CALGARY 



JO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



Winnipeg Hardware Quotations 



AMMUNITION 

Powder, per kes, $11.00. 

Shot, soft, per cwt., $17.20; chill- 
ed, $18.70; buckshot, $18.00; ball. 
$18.40. 

Dominion Metellics— B.B. Caps, 
$2.80; CiB. Caps, $3.60: 22 Shori 
Blaek or Lesmok, $4; 22 Long 
Black or Lesmok, $4.80; 22 Short 
Smokeless, $4.30; 22 Long Smoke- 
less, $6 ; 22 Long Rifle Black, $5.60 ; 
22 Long Eifle Smokeless, $7 per M. 
net. Center Fire Pistol, 22% ; Cen- 
ter Fire Sporting, 25% off Ameri- 
oan list. 

American Metallics — B.B. Caps, 
{3.06: C.B. Caps, $3.85; 22 Short 
Slack, $4.86 ; 22 Long Black, $5.25 , 
22 Long Rifle Blaek, $7.70 ; 22 Short 
Smokeless, $4.69; 22 Long Smoke- 
less, $6.65; 22 Long Rifle Smoke. 
»7.66 per M. net. Center Fire Pis- 
tol, 10% on list; Center Fire 
Sporting, 19% on list. 

Loaded Shells— Crown Black Pow- 
der, 12 ga., $31 ; Sovereign Smoke- 
less, 12 ga., $38; Regal Smokeless, 
12 ga., $88; Nitro Club Smokeless, 
12 ga., $41 ; Canuck Smokeless, 12 
ga., $41 per M. net. Empty Paper 
Shot Shells, $14 per M. ; Empty 
Brass Shot Shells, $6.65 per 100. 

ANVILS 

Peter Wright, 80 lbs. and up. 24c 
per lb. ; clip horn, 25c lb. 
Norris, 80 lbs. and over, 16c. 

AXES 

Single Bit $14 50 $20 00 

Double Bit 16 60 21 50 

Broad axes 32 00 35 00 

AUGER BITS 

Standai-d List Prices per Dozen 

S/16 $6 00 18/16 $12 00 

4 6 00 19 14 00 

6 6 00 20 14 00 

6 6 00 21 16 00 

7 5 00 22 16 00 

t 6 00 23 18 00 

9 S 60 24 18 00 

10 8 00 26 21 00 

11 7 00 26 21 00 

12 7 00 27 24 00 

18 8 26 28 24 00 

14 8 25 29 27 00 

IS 9 60 30 27 00 

16 9 60 81 80 00 

IT 18 00 32 30 00 

Discounts from standard list prices 

Irwin 10% 

Gilmour 46% 

BARS, CROW. $10.25 per 100 lbs. 

BAR IRON 

Bar iron. — $5.50 base ; Swedish 
iron, $5.25; sleigh shoe steel, $5.80; 
spring steel, $6.50; machinery steel, 
$8.00 ; tool steel, octagon, 100 lbs., 

$13. 

BELTING 

Rubber, 6 in. and under, 25- 
2V2%: over 6 in., 20%. 

Agricultural or No. 1 leather 
belting, 47%% off list. 

Standard, 30, 10 and 6% off list. 

The "double" list is just twice 
the price of "single." 

BELT LACING 

In sides, tanned, $1.65 per lb. ; 
cut, $1.85 per lb. ; rawhide, sides, 
$1.60; cut, $1.80. 

Blue Stone (VHroI). 12e lb. 



BOLTS 

Carriage, % and smaller, 5% : 
7-16 and larger, 6% on list ; ma- 
chine, % and under, 6% ; 7-16 and 
over, 6% on list ; machine set 
screws, 26% ; plough bolts, 5% on 
list; stove bolts, 60%; shaft belts, 
5% on list ; tire bolts, 25% ; sleigh 
shoe bolts to % and smaller. 5% on 
list; 7-16 and up, 5% on list. 

BORAX. Borax, per lb , 14c. 

BUILDING PAPER 

Tarred, $1.10 to $1.60 per roll, 
according to quality : plain, 80c to 
J1.46. 

BUTTS 

Plated — No. i;41 Antique Copper 
and Dull Brass Finish 

Per pr. 

21/2 x2V4 in 35 

3x3 in 37 

31/2x31,1, in 3& 

4x4 in 47 

4'-;, x4V2 in 68 

5 X 5 in 80 

Wrought Steel- 
No. 840 Net list 

No. 800 5% on list 

No, 838 Net list 

No. 804 5% off list 

CHAIN 

Coil, 3-16 in,, $18.40: %, $16,00; 
5-16 in., $13.60; %. $12.40: 7-16, 
$12,20; 1/5, $12.00: 9-16, $12.00; %, 
$11.75; %, $11.50: 1 in,, $11,25; 
Logging, 5-16 in.. $15,40 : %. 
$14,20; 1/2. $13.80; tie-out, 47%%, 

CHURNS 

Barrel, No. 0, $7.20; No, 1, $7.20 
No, 2, $8; No. 3, $8.80: No, 4 
$10 40 each. 

CLEVISES, MALL. 15c per lb. 

CLOCKS— Alarm 

Each 

Rig Ben $2 90 

Baby Ben 2 90 

America 1 25 

Lookout 1 50 

Sleepmeter 1 66 

COPPER 

Sheet and planished copper. 75c 
per lb. Tinned, 60e. 

CORD SASH 

Coils or Hanks 
8. 9, 10 72c lb. 

DRILLS 

Bit itoek. 85% : Blacksmith. V2 
in, round shank, 20%. 

EAVETROUGH 

Eavetrough, per 100 ft., 8 in., 
$6.85: 10 in., $7.60; 12 in., $8.95. 

Conductor pipe, 2 in., per 100 ft., 
$8 ; 3 in., $9.65 ; 4 in., $12.75. 

ENAMELWARE 

See Wares. 

FILES 

Globe Discount 45% 

Nicholson Gen Discount 30% 

FITTINGS 

Malleable Black Galv. 

Class B $ 27 $ 38 

Class C 171/2 27 

Bushings 20% 

Unions 30% 

Nipples 4" and un- 
der 46% 

FORMALDEHYDE 

400-n). bbla., 29e lb.; 800-lb. bar- 
rels, SOe n>. : 100-U>. barrels, 81c 
lb. ; lO-lb. jugs, $3.40 each ; 6-lb. 
jugs, $1.90 each; 2-Ib. jng», 90e 
each. 
GALVANIZED WARE 

Sec Wbn*. 



(.LASS, WINDOW Single Double 

Up to 25 in $13 50 $18 50 

26 to 40 14 50 21 00 

41 to 50 18 50 23 75 

51 to 60 19 50 24 25 

61 to 70 20 50 25 75 

GLASS (Plate) 

Net list. 

GLOBES— LANTERN 

Doz. 

Short Pattern $1 10 

Cold Blast, regular 1 00 

GRINDSTONES 

Per 100 lbs., $2.75. 
Mounted on steel frames, $5,00 to 
$6.75. 

HARVEST TOOLS. 25%. 

HINGES 

Light T and strap. 10%, 
Corrugated Strap Hinges — 4. 

$1,70; 6, $$2.10; 6. $2.85: 8. $4.60. 

10, $7: 12. $10.75. 

Corrugated Tee Hinges — 4, $1.90 : 
6. $2.55; 6, $3.25; 8. $6,65: 10, 
»8.75: 12. $12.40. 

HORSKSHOES 

Iron, No. to 1, $7.35 ; No, 2 
and larger, $7.10 ; snowshoes, No. 
to No. 1, $7,60 : No. 2 and larger, 
$7.35 : steel. No. to 1, $7.80 ; No. 
2 and larger, $7.55 : featherweight. 
$8.95. 

Apollo and 
IRON, GALVANIZED "Fleur 

Premier de Lis" 
10% oz. or 28 Eng...$ll 70 $11 70 
28 Am. or 26 Eng... 11 40 11 40 
26 Am. or 26 special 11 10 11 10 

24 10 95 10 05 

22 10 95 10 95 

13 and 20 10 80 10 «C 

16 Am 10 65 10 60 

IRONS, SAD 

Common Sad Irons, 8 lbs,. He 

per lb. ; 4 lbs., 14c per lb. 

Mrs. Pott's No. 55, set $2 10 

Mrs. Pott's No. 50, set 2 25 

Mrs. Pott's common sad iron 
handles, $1.60 dozen. Mrs. Pott's 
improved, $2.10 a dozen. 

JACKSCREWS 

10% off list. 

KNIVES— HAY 

Doz. 

Heath's $12 50 

Lightning 12 50 

LAMP CHIMNEYS 

A, per case 8 doz.. $7.80 per doz,, 
$1.05 ; B, per case 6 doz,, $6,50 : per 
doz., $1.15. 

LANTERNS 

No 2, plain $13 00 

No. 25, Dash-board 17 60 

Short Globe, doz 13 00 

LEAD PIPE, $14.40. 
LEAD WASTE, $15.40. 

LATCHES— THUMB. STEEL 

Doz, 

2 $2 10 

3 2 80 

4 4 90 

Barn Door 

5 2 80 

8 3 00 

9 5 20 

LINSEED OIL 
See weekly rei>ort. 



MACHINES— WASHING 

Each 

Dowswell $ 5 65 

New Century B 11 65 

New Idea 13 W) 

Snowball 9 75 

.MATTOCKS 

Pick, $11 ; cutter, $11. 

MOPS 

Doz. 

O'Cedar Polish. No. 1 $12 00 

O'Cedar Polish, No. 3 12 00 

Self- Wrmging 5 26 

MOWERS— LAWN 

14 in. 16 in. 

Woodyatt $7 75 $8 26 

Empress 10 00 10 64 

Daisy 6 15 , 

Star 7 00 7 60 

NAILS 

Wire, f.o.b. Fort William. $5.6« 
base ; Winnipeg, $6 base. Cut f ,0 b 
Winnipeg. $6.55. 

NETTING— POU LTRV 

Net Prices Per Rotl 

1 in. mesh x 24 in $6 9.^ 

30 in 7 20 

36 in 8 5u 

2 in. mesh x 24 in 2 90 

30 in 3 40 

36 in 4 Of 

48 in 5 2."; 

60 in 6 56 

72 in 7 81 

NETTING. Poultry, 16%. 

Banner Netting, 24 in.. $4.16 : 36 
in., $6.30; 48 in., $6.25: 60 in.. 
$7.40; 72 in., $8.40. 

NUTS 

Square, small lots, blank, 4%c 
tapped, 4?4c advance on list ; Hexa- 
gon, small lots, blank, 4%c ; Tap- 
ped, 5c advance on list ; case lots 
all styles, Ic less than above. 

OILS 

"Buffolite," 24c : Ideal Thresher, 
47c : "B" Castor machine oil, 38c ; 
Buffalo engine gasoline, 3714c ; Buf- 
falo "A" gas engine oil, 50c ; Royal 
gasoline, 37c ; Family safety coal 
oil, 24%c ; "Engoline" engine coil 
oil, 20%c; Summer black oil, 221/20; 
Kelso engine oil, 47c ; Electro oil, 
45c ; Royalite oil, 20c ; Standard 
gas engine oil, 48c ; Prairie Har- 
vester oil, 49%c. 

PAINTS 

Stephens' Out White, $3.96 ; 
Stephens' House, $3.85 ; Stephens' 
Floor, $3.30 ; Silkstone. $3.16 ; Ste- 
phens' Barn Paint, $1.70. 

DRY COLORS 

Yellow ochre, in bbl. lots, 8c : 
less than barrel lots, 4e ; golden 
ochre, barrels. 4e less ; than barrels, 
5c ; Venetian red, barrels, $2.60 : 
less than barrels. $3.60 ; American 
Vermillion, 20c ; English vermillion, 
$3 per lb. : Canadian metallic ox- 
ides, barrel lots. 3%c ; English 
purple oxide, in casks, 8%e : less 
quantities, 4c per lb. Red lead, 
kegs, $19 ; less quantities, 20e. 

PICK, Clay, 6-7, $12.26 per doz. 

POLISH— 

O-Cedai^ Doz. 

4 oz $2 00 

12 oz 4 00 

1 quart 10 *0 

% gal 16 M 

1 Kal 84 00 

Liquid Veneer — 

4 oz 8 00 

12 ez 4 00 

1 quart 8 40 

% gal 14 4» 

(Continacd mi sccobJ »■#».> 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



71 




Each Succeeding Spring /% 
Means a greater t 

Paint Turnover • 



Repeat orders and new business that swell Stephens' 
Sales are merely the results we anticipated from the 
good-will begun the first day Stephens' Paints were 
manufactured. 



Year after year 
sales increase i n 

volume each 

su cceeding year 
means a greater 
Paint turnover 
than ever be- 
fore. And we 
always knew it 
would. 




I »iade with Manitoba U(ns*e<l OU ^ ^ 

HOUSE PAINT 




If you are not sat- 
isfied with yo u r 
paint for this 
Season, if you feel 
that your in- 
crease will not be 
as great as you 
deserve, get i n 
touch with us at 
once. 



Let us explain the Stephen proposition and tell 
you what it is doing for other dealers. 



G. F. STEPHENS & CO., LIMITED 



Paint and Varnish Makers 

WINNIPEG AND CALGARY 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out noiv and place with letters to be answered. 



72 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918. 



Winnipeg Hardware Quotations 



■Continued 



PIPE, WROUGHT IRON 

Per 100 Ft. Black 

% inch $ 6 08 

% inch 6 16 

% inch 7 83 

% Inch 9 95 

1 Inch 14 67 

1% inch 19 88 

IMi inch 23 76 

2 inch 32 04 

2% inch 51 30 

3 inch 67 06 

3^ inch 84 92 

4 inch 100 62 

4% inch 116 10 

6 inch 1S6 00 

J inch 174 60 



Galv. 
$ 8 42 

8 60 

9 63 
12 38 
18 27 
24 76 
29 57 
39 78 
63 59 
83 16 



PLASTER. Paris, per bbl., $4.50. 

PLATES, CANADA 

18 X 21 per box, half polish, $11 ; 
full polished $12.50; 18 x 24, half 
polished, $11; full polished, $12.50; 
20 X 28, half polished, $11 ; full 
polished, $12.50. 

PLOW SHARES, 21c per lb. 
POINTS 

Landslide plow, IMtxH in., $3 66 
per dozen. 

PUTTY 

100-lb. irons $5 70 

25-lb. irons, per cwt 6 30 

iy2-lb. tins 12 

RIVETS AND BURRS 

Iron rivsts, 10% ; copper. No. 7, 
C6c lb. ; No. 8, 66c ; No. 9, 69c ; No. 
10, 71c ; No. 12, 76c. 

Five-lb. assorted boxes. No. 8, 
74c: No. 10, 79c lb. 

Copper Burrs, No. 7, 66c ; No. 8, 
C6c; No. 9, 69c; No. 10, 71c; No. 
12, 76c. 

ROPE 

Sisal, 2814c base ; pure Manila, 
39%c base;- British Manila, 33%c 
base ; lath yarn, 28i/4c base ; African 
hemp, 33%c base; cotton rope, % 
and over, 65c lb. 

Tarred Marline Panka, per lb., 
60c. 

SANDPAPER— 

Star — Quire Ream 

00, 0, V2 $0 38 $ 7 20 

1 39 7 50 

1% 43 8 10 

2 46 8 70 

2% 49 9 SO 

3 67 10 80 

B. & A.— 

0«. 0, % 45 8 60 

1 47 9 00 

1% 60 9 60 

* 66 10 60 

a "A 60 11 00 

!• •87 12 75 



SASH BALANCES (Caldwell). 
Net list. 

SAWS, BUCK 

Happy Medium, $10.00 ; Watch 
Spring, $10.40 ; Lance Tooth or 
Lightning Blades, $10.90. 

SCREWS 

Bright iron round head, 60% ; flat 
head, 65% ; round head, brass, 25% ; 
flat head, brass, 80% ; coach, 20%. 



SCYTHES— 



Doz. 



Bramble $13 25 

Bush 13 25 

Excelsior 14 60 

Cast 12 60 

SNATHS— 

No. 2 loop 11 60 

Bush 13 00 

SWEEPERS, CARPET— 

See list in regular "Current Mar- 
ket Quotations" Column, f.o.b. fac- 
tory, Niagara Falls, Ont. 

SWEEPERS, VACUUM— Doz. 

Grand Rapids, Nic $ 87 00 

Household, Jap 75 00 

Superba, Nic 102 00 

F.o.b. Jobbers' Warehouses, Win- 
nipeg. 

STEEL SHEETS, BLACK 

10 gauge $9 45 

12 gauge 9 45 

14 gauge 9 45 

16 gauge 9 J5 

18-20 gauge 9 30 

22-21 gauge 9 SO 

26 gauge 9 35 

28 gau<{e 9 45 

SHOVELS AND SPADES 

Shovels— Fox and Olds, D.H., Sqr. 
Pt., $13.50 per doz.; D.H. Rd. Pt., 
$13.50 per doz.; L.H. Sqr Pt., 
$13.50; L.H. Rd. Pt., $13.50; Bull- 
dog and Jones, D.H., Rd. Ft., $15. 50 ; 
D.H. Sqr. Pt., $15.50; L.H., Rd. 
Pt., $15.50; L.H., Sqr. Pt., $15.50; 
L.H., Rd. Pt.. $15.50; Black Cat 
and Crescent Scoops — No 4, $17.00 
doz.: No. 6, $17.50; No. 8, $18.00: 
No. 10. $18.50; Moose & Jones 
Scoops, No. 4, $18.25 ; No. 6, $18.75 ; 
No. 8, $19.25; No. 10, $19.75. 

SOLDER. Per pound, 66 to 67. 
SPIKES 

Pressed, 14 in., $8.39; 6-16, $7.96; 
%. $7.76; Ml. $7.56. 

STAPLES 

Bright wire, per cwt., $5.85 at 
Fort William, $6.25 Winnipeg ; gal- 
vanized staples, $6.66 Fort William. 
$7.05, Winnipeg. 

STEEL 

Sleighshoe, $6.80 base per cwt. ; 
plow, common, $6.50 ; crucible plow, 
$7.60; angle, $5.35; harrow, $5.60 
base : cast, octagon tool steel, 20c 
base ; square tool, 20c base ; spring, 
$7.60 : machine, $8.00 base ; tire. 
$5.60. Mid, 3-16, %, 5-16, $8.00 
base ; other sizes $6.75 base. Band 
Steel. $5.75 base. 



STEEL HOOPS 

% in., $9.76 ; % in., $9.60 ; % to., 
$8.75; % in., $8.60; 1 in., $8.50; 
114 in., $8.50; 1^4 in., $8. 

STEEL SQUARES 

5% on list. 

TACKS. Carpet, 65% list. 
TIES. Cow. 6%. 

TIN AND TERNE PLATE 

20 X 28 LC $32 00 

20 X 28 LX 35 00 

20 X 33 I.C 37 85 

20 X 33 I.X 40 00 

Terne plates 24 00 

TRAPS, GAME— Doz. 

Victor H.& N. Jump 

No. $1 95 

No. 1 2 30 $3 60 $3 10 

No. 1% 3 45 5 40 4 55 

No. 2 4 80 7 60 6 70 

No. 3 6 40 10 00 

TUBS— Wood Fibre 

No. $21 35 $23 80 

No. 1 18 80 20 45 

No. 2 1€ 40 16 95 

No. 3 14 00 14 45 

TURPENTINE 

See weekly report. 

TWINE (WRAPPING) Lb. 

Cotton, 4-ply 72 

Cotton, 3-ply 68 

Dozen 

VARNISHES 

Stephens Luminette, gal $2 20 

Stephens Exalite, gal 3 00 

WARES, ETC. 

Scotch Grey, 40, 12>4% discount. 

Colonial, Imperial, Pearl, 20. 
714% discount. 

Premier, Canada, Diamond, 2%% 
discount. 

Whiteware, 40, 10% discount. 
Japanned Ware, list, plus 30%. 

Japanned Ware, white, list, plus 
40%. 

Japanned Sprinklers, list, plus 
30%. 

Stamped Ware, plain, 40, 10% 
discount. 

Stamped Ware, ret'd, 40% dis- 
count. 

Pieced Tinware, ordinary, list, 
plus 40%. 

Pieced Tinware, copper bottoms. 
list, plus 60%. 

Sheet Iron Ware, list, plus 20%. 

Light Galv'd Pails and Tubs, list, 
plus 27%%. 

Heavy Galv'd Pails and Tubs, 
17%% discount. 

Jap. Coal Hods, list, plus 35%. 

Galv'd Coal Hods, list, plus 60%. 



WASHERS 

Iron, (mall lota, 16% n Ibt -f 
T6e; full boxea, iron, 1»% on lto« 

+ 75c. 

WHITE LEAD 

Decorators' pure, ton lots, $17.75;: 
less than ton lots, $18.10. 

WIRE, BARB 

Lyman, 4-point, $4.96 f.o.b. Fori 
William, $6.25 Winnipeg; Glldden 
Cattle, 2-pt., $4.80 Fort William. 
$5.10 Winnipeg; Baker 2-pt., $4.76 
Ft. William, $5.06 Winnipeg; plain. 
twist, cwt.. Ft. William, $4.96 ; Win-^ 
nipeg, $6.26 spool ; plain galvanized. 
Ft. William, No. 9, $5.«6 ; No. 12. 
$5.85 ; Winnipeg, No. 9. $6.05 ; Na 
12, $6.25; coil spring, Ft. WHUam., 
No. 9, $5.70; No. 12, $6.95; Winni 
peg. No. 9, $6.10: No. 12, $8.36. 

Patented screen in IO«-ft. roll*. 
$3.50 per hundred sq. ft. ; in 60-ft- 
rolls, $3.60 per 100 sq. ft. 

WIRE. PLAIN 

Bale ties, 14 arance, Binglm loop. 
$7.66 Winnipeg; $7.26 Ft. WlllUm 

Brass snare wire, per '!>., gOe. 

WIRE ANNEALED 

No. 9, $6.75; 10, $6.80; 12, $6.95? 
14, $7.16; 16, $7.25; 16, $7.40 per 
100 lbs. 

WRENCHES (NUT)— 

Agricultural — Dob. 

6 in $ 6 50 

8 in 7 go 

10 in 9 10 

12 in n 70 

15 in 15 60 

Perfect Handle— 

6 in 13 50 

8 in 16 20 

10 in 18 90 

12 in 24 30 

15 in 32 48 

18 in 43 20 

WRENCHES (PIPE)— 

Stillson — Each 

8 In $1 96 

• in 1 1» 

10 in 1 2B 

14 in 1 76 

18 in 2 50 

24 in s c« 

36 in 6 76 

Trimo — 

10 in $1 46 

14 in 2 00 

18 in 2 90 

24 in 4 16 

Dozen 

Always Ready— Black N.P. 

No. 1 $4 to $4 60 

No. 2 J 76 6 00 

WRINGERS 

Royal Canadian, $61,90 per dos. ; 
Eze, $66.10 per dos. ; Bloyale, 861 
per doz. ; AJax, $126.00 doi. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAI. 



73 



S> 






I 

rl 



STEEL IRON METALS 

WINNIPEG WAREHOUSE STOCK 

REINFORCING BARS IN ALL SIZES, IN LENGTHS UP TO 60' 
BOLTS, MACHINE, CARRIAGE, DRIFT, SHIPBUILDING, ELEVATOR 
BAR IRON, [FLAT, ROUND AND SQUARE, SMALLEST TO THE LARGEST' 
BOILER TUBES NUTS RIVETS SHAFTING 

ANGLES CHANNELS RAILS TEES 

FORGING BILLETS CAP SCREWS WASHERS SET SCREWS 

GAUGE SHEETS, BLACK AND GALVANIZED, INfALL GAUGES 

GET OUR MONTHLY STOCK LIST 



THE MANUFACTURER 



A COMPLETE LINE FOR 
THE WHOLESALER— THE RETAILER 



THE CONSUMER 



IF IT'S STEEL OR IRON WE HAVE IT 



^:j?^'K/-^--\«:;:>;.vy;;;;/:;Y>;;.y»u^uy/^Cf^v^;i^^ 



1^ 



TheMANITOBASTEEl&IRON COMPANY. 



4C»»SSS»' 








I 



■ 



f Selling ^^^ Painted Waggon, Implement and 

Plow Sets is satisfactory and profitable. They are made 
from selected No. 1 quality Oak and Hickory, are carefully 
painted (2 coats), striped and varnished, and are absolutely 
guaranteed against defects in material and workmanship. 
The best way to order^^^ Painted Sets is in crates of six 
sets. Then you're sure of getting them in perfect condition. 
—no bruised woods — no marred finish. 



Guarantee 



\ 



All l ^&s/iM^ Sets are 

guaranteed, and any 
defective part will be 
„ replaced free. 



\ 



I. 



Send to-day for the Westm^ 
folder that describes the vari- 
ous ti/ 



imes. 



D.ACKLAND& 
SON, Limited 



*i«\\\>««8SSSfr 



iS^ 



WINNIPEG 
CALGARY 




74 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



llltnUHINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 

I THE BUYERS' GUIDE | 

M If what you want is not here, write ics, and we will tell you where to get it. Let us suggest that you = 

M consult also the advertisers' index facing the inside back cover, after having secured advertisers' name* = 

E from this directory. The information you may desire may be found in the advertising pages. This de- = 

g partment is maintained for the benefit and convenience of our readers. The insertion of advertisers' s 

M headings is gladly undertaken, but does not become part of any advertising contract. s 



Abrasives 

Ibe Cartwrundum Co., Nia«ara Falls, M.X. 

Canadian B, K. Morton Co., Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Aluminum 

British Aluminum Co., Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

A. G. Leslie & Co., Montreal. 

Louis MoLain Co., Ltd., Wiimipeg, Man. 
Aluminum Ware 

Tho». Daridson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Louis MdLain Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. Man 

Merchants Hardware Specialliies, Ltd., Calgary, 

Alts- 
Wars Mfg. Co., OalCTille, Ont 
Ammunition 

Thoa. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Oarerhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Lswis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Remington Amu-Onion Metallic Oartndge Co., 
Windsor. 
Auto Accessories 

Adamson Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Boston Vamish Co., Everett Station, Boston, Mass. 

Canadian Cartwn Co., Toronto. 

Canada Oyole * Motor Co., litd., Westoo, Ont. 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Canadian National Cai*on Co., Toronto. 

Canadian Falrt>ank«JMoise Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Cannon Oiler Co., Keithsburg, III. 

The Cart>onindum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 

Canada Dry Oella, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Cummings Bro3., Flint, Mich. 

Oushman Mc*tor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg. Man. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Agricultural Supplies 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., WinnipM, Man. 

Q«o. W. Griffiths & Son., Stratford, Ont. 

Hyilop Bros., Toronto. 

C. Kloepper, Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Leeks & Potts, Hamilton, Ont. 

Line, Hansen & Kimball Co., Moose Jaw, Bask. 

Meital Specialties Mfg. Co., Chicago, IM. 

Frank Moasberg Co., AtUeboro, Mass. 

MoKinnoB Chain Co., St. Catharines. , „ ,^ 

New Era Spring Specialty Co., Grand Rapids, 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 

Northern Blectrio Co., Ltd., Montrsal. 

Will B. Lane, Chicago, Ul. 

Reeder Weeks Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Reck Island Mfg. Co., Chicago. 111. 

C. A. Shaler Co., 'Waupun, Wis. 

■niermoid EuJAer Co., Trenton, N.J. 

Samu«I Trees & Co., Toronto. 

Titoont Mfe. Co., Roxburj, Mass. 

WilkiBSon * Kompass. Hamilton. 

Ktaiinger, Bruce A Co., Niagara FaUs, Ont 

Uneeds Ford Demountable WTieel Co., Toronto. 

Vemald Mfg. Co.. North Bast. Pa. 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Automobiles , i , r. 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Axes 

Thos. Birkett A Son Co.. Ltd.. Otnwa 

Canada Foundries & Forglngs, Brockrille. 

Can. Warren Axe and Tool Co., 8t. Oatharin**. 

CateihiU, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 
Babbitt Metal 

Thos. Birk«tt A Son Co.. Ltd., Ottawa. 

8 an. B. K. Morton Co., Montreal, 
anada Metal Co., Tonmto. 

CaTerhlll, Learmont A Co., Montrtal. 

Hoyt Metal Cs., Toronto. 

Owl Metal Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Tallman Brass A Metal Co., Hamilton. 
Barrel Liners 

J. N. Warminton A Co., Montreal, Que. 
Basins. China and Enamelled Iron 

Bnnplre Mfg. Co.. London, Ont. 
Batteries, Dry 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Great West Electrip Co.. Ltd., Winnipeg, Man, 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 

Dominion Battery Co.. Ltd.. Toronto, Ont. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que, 

Northern Electric Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Baths. Enamelled and Copper 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

HSmpire Mfg. Co.. London, Ont 
Bath Room Fixtures 

Wmplre Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

KlnitBger, Bruce A Co., Ltd., Niagara Falls. 

Newell Mfg. Co., Presoott, Ont. 



Bends, Brass, Iron and Lead 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Bibbs, Basin and Bath Cocks, Compression 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Jaa. Morrison Brass Mfg. To., Toronto. 
United Brassfounders, Ltd., Manchester, Eng, 
Bibbs, Basin and Bath Cocks, Fuller 

Empire Mfg, Co., London, Ont 

Jaa. Morrison Brass Mfg. To., Toronto. 

United Brassfoimders, Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 
Brass Goods 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont 
Brass Castings and Goods 

Booth jConlter Co., Toronto, 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Jas. Cartland A Son, Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

Empire Mfg, Co., London, Ont 

Jas. Morrison Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Tallman Brass A Metal Co., Hamilton. 

Tlie Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 

United Brass Foiuiders, Ltd., Manchester. Ehig. 

Williams Bros. A Piggott, Ltd., Birmingham, 
Eng. 
Brass. Sheets and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Co., Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 

A. C. Leslie A Co., Montreal. 

Tallman Brass A Metal Co., HamUton. 
Bevels 

Stanley Rule A Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

L. 8. Btarrett Co.. Athol. Mass. 
Belting, Transmission, Elevator and Coneyor 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Belting. Rubber 

Can. Consolidated Rubber Co., Montreal. Que. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gutta Percha A Rubber. Ltd.. Toroako. 
Belting, Cotton 

Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Blacksmiths' Supplies 

D. Ackland A Son, Winnipeg. 
Blankets, Saddle 

BurTincrfon Windsor Blanket Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Gait Robe Co., GaJt, Ont. 
Bolts and Nuts 

Baines A Peckover, Toronto. 

Canadian Tube A Iron Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Caverhlll, Learmont A Co., Montreal. 

C. Kloepper, Limited. Toronto, Ont. 

Lewis Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

London Bolt A Hinge Works, London. Ont- 

The Stanley Works. New Britain, Conn. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co.. Toronto, Ont. 

Northern Bolt A Screw Co.. Owen Sound 

Wilkinson A Kompass, Hamilton. 
Boiler Tubes 

Baines A Peckover, Toronto. 
Boilers. Heatincr and Range 

Emoire Mfg. Co., JLondon, Ont. 
Bolts. Eye 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn. N.T. 
Bolts, Panic 

Wm, Newman & Sons. Birmingham. Eng. 
Boxes, Wood 

Canadian Wood Products Co., Toronto. Can. 
Boot Calks and Tools 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Boring Bars 

Pratt A Whitney Co., Ltd,, Dundas, 
Box Opening Tools 

Bridigeiport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Bale Ties 

Beauchamp. J. E,, Montreal. 

Laidlaw Bale Tie Co., Hamilton. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd.. Hamilton. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Bale Tie Buckles 

J. N, Warminton A Co., Montreal, Que. 
Barbed Wire 

Banwell, Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ltd., Hamilton. 
Baskets 

Walter Woods A Co., Hamilton. 
Bam Door Hangers 
.VUith Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling. 111. 

Stanley Works. New Britain. Conn. 

TaylorJForbes Co., Ouelph, Ont 
The Toronto Lock ^Ifg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Barrel Stands 

Wakyte Mfg. Co,, Winnipeg. 
Balers, Steel 

Climax Baler Co., Hamilton. 

Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 



Bit, Braces 

Carerhill, Learmont A Co,, Montreal. 

Russell, Jennings Mfg. Co., Chester, Conn. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Qreenfleld, Mass. 

Stanley Rule A Level Co,, New Britain, Conn. 
Brackets, Shelf 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

The Stanley Works, New Britafai. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Out 
Box Strapping 

J. E. Beauchamp A Co., Montreal. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Coon. 

J. N, Warminton A Co., Montreal, Que. 
Blasting Supplies 

Dupont Powder Co., Wilmington, Del. 
Building Papers 

Mc.irthur A Co., Alex., Montreal, Que. 
Butter Molds 

Wm. Cane A Sons Co., Ltd., Newmarket, Ont. 

Walter Woods A Co.. Hamilton, Can. 

Butter Workers 

Beatty Bros., Ltd,, Fergus, Ont 
Butts and Hinges 

Canada Foundries A Forgings, Brockville, Ont 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

Caverhill, Learmont A Co,, Montreal. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, UL 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg, Co., Toronto, Ont 
Burrs 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 

Pannenter A Bullock, Gananoque. 
Bread and Cake Makers 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co,, Ltd., Montreal. 

Landers, Frary A Clark, New Britain, ci>an. 
Breast Drills 

Stanley Rule A Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Brushes and Brooms 

Boeckh Bros, Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Meakins A Sons, Ltd., Hamilton. 

Megan tic Broom Co,, Lake Megantlc, Que. 

T. S. Slmms A Co., Ltd,, 8t John. 

Walter Woods A Co., Hamilton. 
Bits, Auger 

Caverhill, Learmont A Co., MaDtreal. 

Russell, Jennings Mfg. Co., fester, Qdoil 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., PhQadelphla, F». 

Wilkinson A Kbnypass, Hamilton. 

Scythes, Ltd., Toronto. 
Bits, Forstner 

Progressive Mfg. Co,, Torringtoa, Osiin. 
Bicycles 

A. E. Bregent A Co., Monitreal, Que. 

Canada Cycle A Motor Co., Toronto. 

Hyslop Bros,, Ltd., Toronto. 

Iver Johnson Arms A Cycle Works, Ltd., Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co., Ltd., Weston, Oat 
Buckles, Bale Tie 

J. E. Beauchamp A Co., Montreal, Que, 
Builders' Hardware 

Allith Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 

J. Brais A Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Thos. Birkett A Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Caverhill, Learmont A Co., Montreal. 

Canada Steel Goods Co,, Hamilton. 

Jas. Cartland A Son, Ltd., Birmingham, Bna. 

National Hardware Co., Orillia, Ont. 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, IH. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, (}•■■. 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd.. Stratford, Ont. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Bumpers, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire A RuUber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Cabinet Hardware 

Stratford Brass Co., ILtd., Stratford, Ont 
Calipers and Dividers 

Caverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Qreenfleld, Mass. 

L. S. SUrrett Co., Athol, Mass. 
Caliper Ganges 

Williams A Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Cans 

A. R. Whiittall Can Co., Mon/treal, Que, 
Cans, Gasoline, Oil 

Cannon Oiler Co., KeitlMfcurg, 111. 
Canoes 

Canadian Canoe Co., Peteriwro, Ont, 
Carriaee Hardware . . ^ j. 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont 
Cartridges 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Ltd.. Manbs^ 

Remington Anns-Union Metallia Otmtig* «!•., 
Windsor. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



)Whit 

MOP WRINGERS 



EASE OF OPERATION, THEIR 
GREAT UTILITY AND THEIR SUB- 
STANTIAL CONSTRUCTION, COM- 
BINED WITH THEIR 
PRICE, MAKES THE 
WHITE MOP 
WRINGER A RAPID 
SELLER. 



Made of malleable iron 
and the beat of hard 
woods — Maple or 
Birch. Fibj any kind 
of pail and wrings the 
mop thoroughly. 

It has more tban one use 
— often used for fruit and 
regetable presses and 
works perfectly. The ad 
Tent of the White Mop 
Wringer proved a boon 
to the housewife — It sells 
itself and is a good 
proflt-maker. 



White Mop 
Wringer Co. 

FULTONVILLE 
N.Y. 



When in need of 

Wrapping Paper 
T^vines &Cordage 



B 



rooms 
rushes 
askets 



Grocers' Sundries 



Walter Woods & Co. 

Hamilton & Winnipeg 











UNIVERNISH 

^^ihe varnish that lasts 
longest' ' 

This varnish beats them all. 
You can pour boiling water 
on it, spill hot tea, coffee, 
ammonia or alcohol. Noth- 
ing harms it. Nothing 
turns it white. 

It is uniform in quality and 
color. 

Buy a can now and in six 
months it is the same. You 
will get the same satisfying 
results with it. 

T h i s is the VARNISH a 
dealer should always have 
in stock. 

Order a case to-day. 

We will gladly send you 
our proposition on request. 

The Dougall Varnish Co. 

Limited 

"the varnish that lasts longest" 

MONTREAL - CANADA 



// any advertisement interests yc^u, tear it out now and place with letters to be anawcred. 



76 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



Cash Carriers 

Uipe-Hazard 3tore SerrJce Co., Taroato. 
Casters 

Faultless Caster Co., ETansTille, lad. 

Canada Poundrlea & Forgings, Ltd., BrookviU* 
Ont. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. Ont 
Carpet Sweepers 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Co., Niagara Falls, Ont. 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Carerhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Chains, Coil, Boom, Hammock, Tether, Dog, 
Halter, Cow, Breast, Trace, Tire 

McKinnon Chain Co., Su Catharines, Oai. 

Eeeder-Weekes Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
Cable Carriers 

Gipe-Hazai-d Store Serrioe Co., Toro»t» 
Cement, Rubbe' 

Dunlop Tiie & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Cement, Roofinr 

Geo. W. Beed & Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Chisels, Cape, Cold, etc. 

Brown-Boggs Co., Ltd., Hamilton. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Qreenifleld, Mass. 

Buck Bras., Mllhunr, Mass. 

Stanlej Ruie & Level Co., New BritaiB, Ctnut- 

National .Machinery & Supply Co.. HimillAi. 

The Toronto I,r>ck Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 

Checking Floor Hinges 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, IH. 

Toronto Lock .Mfg. Co., Toroin.;. 
Chemical Closets 

Wakyte .Mfg. Co., Winnipeg, .\l,«i. 
Chemical Specialties 

Vol-Peek Mfg. Co., .Montreal. 
Chucks, Tap 

Wells Bros, of Canada. Oalt. 
Chums, Hand and Power 

BeattT Bros., Ltd., Fergus. 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd,, Ottawa. 

Caterhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Dowswell, Lees Co.. Hamilton. 

Faultless Caster Co., Evansville, Ind. 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, C«>n. 

Merchants Hardware Specialties, Ltd., GalgaiT, 
Alta. 

Reliable Chum Co., Toronto, Can. 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 

Clocks 

Western Clock Co., La Salle, 111. 
Clothes Racks 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Clamps 

Can. Foundries & Forginits, Ltd.. Breokrflle, Omi 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 

Clippers 

American Shearer iMifg. Co., Nashan, N.H. 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago, 111. 

Closet SeaU 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., BrockrllU, Ont 

Clothes Dryers 

Dowswell, Lees Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Caa, 
C 

Canadian Woodenwar* Co., St. Thamaa, Ont. 
Coffee Percolators and Urns 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto, 

Great We«t Electric Co., Ltd., WlanlMg, Man. 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Cena. 
Corrugated Fastener* 

J. K. Beauchamp, Moatreal. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Gona. 
Collar Pads 

American Pad & Textile Co., Chatham. 
Cotton GIoTes 

American Pad & Textile Co., Chatham. 
Coal Chates 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Torontoi 

Winnipeg Ceiling tc Roofing Oo., Winnipeg. 
Coal ?ods 

TRios. DaTldson Mfg. Co., /td., Montreal, Que. 
Cobblers' Sets 

Can. Foundries * Forgings, Ltd., Brockrille, Ont. 
Cookers, Steam 

Louis McLaln Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man, 

Cookers, Firelees 

Royal Firelees Cooker Co., Ottawa. Ont. 
Concrete, Reinforcing Steel 

Balnes & Peokorer, Toronto. 
Condnctor Pipe, Hooks, etc. 

Mcrtallle Rooflng Co., Toronto and WinnliMc, 

Thos. Davidson 'Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Uontreal. 

Winnipeg Ceiling ft Roofing Co., Winnipeg. 

Wheeler & Bain, Toronto. 

Enmlre Mftt. Co., London, Ont. 
Connecting Rods 

William.s t^ Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Coping Saws 

Thos. Birkett ft Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Briteeiport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Cobb. 
Cordage 

Branrtford Cordage Co., Brantford. Ortt 

Consnmers Cordage Co., Ueotreal. 

Plrmouth Cordage Co., Toronto. 
Cooking Ware 

ComiB* Glass T^Torks, Coming, N.T. 
Crank Shafts 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N,T. 
Crowbars 

B. .T. Corhlin & Co., Moi.^real. 
CnlttTaters 

J. ■. (Msen Mfg. Co., Port Washington, m. 

C. 8. Votmtm ft Smh, Btulmdl, m. 



Cutlery 

Bridgei)ort Hdwe. iMfg. Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Oee. BuUer & Co., Ltd., SheffUld, Bng. 

Thoa. birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Qarertiill, Leanaont ft Co., Montreal. 

Qoodell-Fratt Co., Greenfield, Maas. 

James Mutton ft Co., Montreal. 

Canadian Wm, A. Rogers, Ltd., Toronto. 

Jonathan Crookes ft Son, Ltd., Sheffield, Eng. 

Lewis Bros. Ltd., MontreaL 

Landers, Frary ft Clark, New Britain, Conn. 

Wm. Rogers iMfg. Co., Niagara Falls, Ont 

J. WVm ft Sons. 
Cutters 

Buttei-fleld & Co., Inc., Rook Island, Que. 

Trimont Mfg. Co., Rozbury (Boston, Mass.). 
Cuspidors 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Dairy Pails 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., .Montreal. 
Dampers, Stove Pipe 

Canada Foimdries & Forgings, Brockville. 
Dampers, Fire Place 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Desks, School 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 
Dies, Stocks, Etc. 

Butterfield ft Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Ltd., Dundas, Ont 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait 
Dish Washers 

Home Helps Sales Co., Montreal. 
Display Racks and Stands 

Cameron & Cameron, Toronto. 

National 'Mfg. Co., Steriing, 111. 
Doors, Metal 

Metallic Rooflng Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Doors, Screen 

Kasement S'krene Dore Co., Toronto. 
Door Bolts 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton, Can. 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn, 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Door Checks 

Canadian Yale & Tovrae, St. Catharines, 

G. W. Maillory Co., Blenheim, Ont 

Wm. Newman & Sons, Birmingham, Ebg. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Door Hangers 

Allith Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Taylor-Forties Co., Guelph, Ont 

National Mfg. Co., Steriing, 111. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Door Springs 

Jas. Cartland & Son, Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

G. W. Mallory, Blenheim, Ont 

Wm. Newman & Sons. Birmingham, Eng. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Door Pulls 

Stra/tford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Onit. 
Draining Tools 

Canadian Shovel ft Tool Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Drills, Breast 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass, 

Stanley Rule & Level Co,, New Britain, Conn. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Drill Chucks 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Maas. 
Drills, Blacksmiths' 

Canada Foundries ft Forgings, Brockville. 
DrilU 

Canadian Falrbanks-IMorse Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Butterfield & Co., Inc., Rock Island, Que. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Wilkinson ft Eompass, Hamilton, Ont. 
Drop Forgings 

Willi.am.<; & Co.. J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Dry Colors 

Brandram-Henderson, 'Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

R. C. Jamieson ft Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa. 

A. Ramsey ft Son Co., Montreal. 

G. F. .Stephens ft Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. 

MartinJSenour Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

McArthur Irwin, Montreal. 
Dnsterm 

Channell Chemical Co., Toronto. 
Dynamite 

Du Pont American Indtistries, Wilmington, Del. 
Dry Cells 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Canadian H. W. Johns^tanville Co., Toronto. 

Canadian Genera] Hectrie Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Dominion Battery Co., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co.. Ltd.. Winnineg, Man. 

Splelmann Agencies, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Earetrongh 

Metallic Rooflng Co., Toronto and Winnipeg, 

Pedlar People, Limited, Oshawa. 

Thos. Darldson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Toronto lyock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Winnipeg Ceiling ft Rooflng Co., Winnipeg. 
Egg Beaters 

Loiils MdLaln Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Cdllette Mfg. Co., Colllngwood. 
Erg Cases 

Miller Bros. Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que, 

Walter Woods ft Co,, Hamilton, 



Kgg Case Fillers 

-Miller Bros. Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Waliter Woods & Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Ejectors and Syphons 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Elbows 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal 

fedlar People, Ltd., Oshawa, Ont 

Wheeler & Bain, Toronto. 

Winnipeg Ceiling ft Hoofing Co., Winnipeg. 
Electric Bells 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West lilectric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Electric Fans 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Klectric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Alaa. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

A. C. Gilbert Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Electric Fixtures 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd,, Toronto 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Wtamipeg, Man. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., MontreaL 

Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton. 
Electric Grates 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg Man 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, 
Electric Materials 

A. G. .Martin, Ottawa, Ont 
Electric Plates 

Louis MdLaiu Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Electric Specialties 

Benjamin Electric Co., Toronto. 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Torente, 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Domimon Battery Co., Ltd., Toronto, Oat. 

Factory Products Co,, Toronto, 

A. C. Gilbert Co., Now Haven, Conn. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man 

Interstate Electric Novelty Co., ToiMite. 

Landers Frary ft Clark, New Britate, Cona. 

National Electric Heating Co., Toronto. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Spieknann Agencies. Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont 
Electrical Toys 

A. C. Gilbert Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Electro-plating 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Enamels 

Boston Varnish Co.. Everett Station, Boston. Mas*, 
Enamelled Ware 

Thoa. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Moatreal. 

Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada, Toronto. 

E. T. Wright Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Engines 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Mao. 
Emery Glass and Papers 

John Oakey & Sons, London, Eng. 
Eveners 

Gregg Mfg. Co., (Ltd., Whmipeg, Man. 

D. Auckland & Son, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Expansion Tanks 

Pease Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Explosives 

Du Pont Powder Co., Wilmington, DeL 
Escutcheon Pins 

Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Ltd., Gartnoque, Oat 
Extinguishers, Fire 

Booth^Coulter Co., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal. 
Fanlight Openers 

Jas. Cartland ft Son, Ltd., Birmingham, flSa(. 
Fanning Mills 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Mao. 
Fasteners, Storm, Sash and Screen 

National Mfg. Co., Steriing, 111. 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd.. Stratford, Ont 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Farm Lighting Outfits 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Norlhem Electric Co., Montreal. 
Faucets, Petroleum 

Can. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, 0»t. 
Feed Boxes 

Canada Foundries ft Forgings, Brockrille. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Feed Cookers 

Wheeler ft Bain, Toronto. 

James Bros. Co., Perth. 
Felts (Tarred and Carpet) 

McArthur & Co., Alex., Montreal, Que. 
Fencinir and Gates 

Banwell-Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Hamllten. 

MoGregor-Banwell Fence Co., Ltd.. WalkerriU* 

Standard Tube ft Fence Co., Woodstock. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamtltaa. 

Ferrules, Brass, Iron and Lead 

Empire Mfg. Cn., London, Ont 

Fibre Ware 

E. B. Eddy Co., Hull, Que. 

Files 

E. C. Atkins Co., Hamilton, Can. 
G. ft H. Bamett Co., PhUadelpfaia. 
Can. B. K. Morton Co., Montreal, Toronto. 
Delta File Works. Philaddpbla. 
Henry DIsston ft Sons. Ltd.. Philadelphia, Pa 
Nicholson File Co., Port Hope, Oat. 
Plewes, Ltd. , Winnipeg, 

Port Hope File Mfg. Co., Port Hope, Ont. 
Simonds Cana<".a Saw Co., Hentreal. 
Wilkinson ft Kompasa, HuaStoD. 
Fillers 
Boston Vamish Co., Brerett fltatlon, Boston, Utm. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



77 




TRADE MARK 



FILES 



HARD AS A DIAMOND 
AND 
STRAIGHT AS A STRING 

TWO BRANDS 

ONE QUALITY— THE BEST 

They Cut Faster and Wear Longer 



PORT HOPE FILE MFG. CO., 

LIMITED 
PORT HOPE - ONTARIO 

"Ask your jobber" 



^nR/^ 



Wroughtand Steel Plate 








OF ALL 
DESCRIPTiaNS 




'.{''aW.' -.'.'.'.'.I'l..' "y.'.-'' 



TRADE MARK 

// any advertisement interests you, tear it 



Annealed Rivet Burrs; Felloe 
Plates; Sheared and Punched 
Plates; Malleable Washers and 
Cast Iron Washers. 

PROMPT SHIPMENTS 

We Guarantee Quality and Service. 

Wrought Washer Mfg. Co. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



■!. 'Vlji-y.-: 



■.;A;.!..i;..f 



MENDETS 

When Prominently 

Displayed 

Are Ready Sellers 

Mendets are known every- 
where for quick and per- 
manent repair of Kitchen 
ware utensils, etc. 

Alarming prices o f 
alum inum, granite, 
iron and tin ware 
have made friends 
for Mendets every- 
where. They sell 
themselves bee ause 
they're nee ded 
in every home 

Order from your 
wholesaler. 

CoUette Mfg. Co., 

CoUingwood, Ontario, Canada 




out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
THE liUYERS' GUIDE 



July 13, 1918 



Fire Arms 

Colts fatent Fire Amu Mfg. Co., Hartfora 
Conn. 

Johnson Iyer Arms & Oyde Works, Fitcbtnirg 
Mass. 
Fire Door Fittings 

Allitli .\Ifg. Co., Ltd., HamOton, Ont. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., UuelpH, Ont. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Fire Extinguishers 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Fire Department Sapplies 

Booth^Coulter Co., Toronto. 

Canadian OonsoUdated Uubber Co., Montreal 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Co., Toronto, Can. 

Uui'ta Percha & Kubber, Ltd., Toronto. 

J as. Morrison Brass M^ Co., Toronto. 

.Northern Electric Co.. Montreal. 
Furnaces 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd.. BrockriUe, Ont. 

.Merchants Hardware Specialties, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 
Flashlights. Electric 

Canadian Oeneral Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Dominion Battery Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, .Man. 

Merchants Hardware SpeciaU;ies, Ltd., Calgarj', 
Alta. 

Metal Specialties Mfg. Co., Chicago. 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal. 

Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 
Flatware 

Canadian Wm. A. Rogers, Toronto. 

Oneida Community, Ltd., Oneida. N.Y. 
Fly Swatters 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Food Choppers 

F. W. Lamplough & Co., Montreal. 

Landers, Frary & Clark. New Britain, Conn. 

Merchants Hardware Specialliies, Ltd., Calgaiy. 
Alta. 
Force Caps 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co.. Toronto. 

Qutta Percha & Rubber, Ltd., Toronto. 
Funnels 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 
Fixtures, Store 

Milbradt Mfg. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Furnaces 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockrille. 

Enteipi-ise Mfg. Co., Sackrille, N.B. 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Ltd., Woodstock, Ont. 

Hall Zryd Foundry Co., Ltd., Hespeler. Ont. 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary. 
Alta. 
Fruit Jars 

Dominion Glass Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Furniture Polish 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

Shei-win-Williams Co., Montreal. 

Channell Chemical Co,, Toronto. 
Fuse Wire 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Floor Stands 

Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 
Floor Checks, Single or Double 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Flint Cloths 

John Oakey & Sons, London, Bng. 
Galvanized Steel Sheets 

Dominion Sheet Metal Co., Ltd., Hamilton. 

A. C. Leslie & Co, Montreal 

Pedlar People Ltd., Oshawa, Ont. 

WTieeler & Bain, Toronto 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co , Winnipeg. 
Garden Cultivators and Weeders 

J. E. Gilson Co., Port Washington. Wis. 

C. S. Noreross & Sons, Bushnell, 111. 

Erie Iron Works, St. ITromas, Ont. 

Eureka Planter Co., Woodstock. 
Garage Hardware 
Allith -MfK. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton, Can. 

NaJtional Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111, 

Richards (WUcos Canadian Co., London, Ont, 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Garbage Cans 

Thos. Darldson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

J. Samuels, Toronto. 

Soren Bros., Toronto. 
Galvanized Ware 

Thos. Dartdson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Sheet Metal Products Oo. of Canada, Toronto. 
Galvanizing 

Thos. Davidson Mtg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Galvanized Iron Cornices 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg 

Pedlar People Ltd., Orihawa, Ont. 
Galvanized Pipe 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Generators 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 
Grsbt West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Glass Jars 

Domtnlon Glass Co., Ltd,, Montreal. 
Gas Water Heaters 
EJmpIre Mfg. Co., London and Toronto. 
Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Ce., Toronto. 
Gaskets, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Gasoline 
Imperial Oil Co., Toronto. 
Prairie City Oil Co., Winnipeg. 
Gauges 
T,. 3. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 



Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Slassware 

Leeks & Potts, Hamilton, Ont. 
Jlasa, Window, Plate, Ornamental 

Leeks & Potts, Hamilton, Can. 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., Toronto. 

G. F. Stephens Co., Winnipeg. 
Glue Pots, Electric 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont. 
ilue. Sheet and Ground 

Canada Glne Co., Brantford, Ont, 

U. C. Jamieeon & Co., Montreal. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal, 
jilass Cutters 

Goodell-Pratt Co., GreenBeld, Mass. 
Miama tietnlen 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., Toronto. 
Glaziers' Diamonds 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd.. Winnipeg, .Man. 

A. Ramsay, Son & Co., Montreal, Que. 

Sharrett & Neivth. London. Eng. 

A. Shaw & Son, London, Eng. 
Gloves 

Hamilton-Carhartt Co., Toronito. 
Granaries, Portable, Metallic 

Pedlar People Ltd., Oshawa, Ont 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co., Winnii>eg. 
Greases 

Prairie City Oil Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Grinders, Hand and Power 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., (Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 

Merchants Hardware Specialltdes, Ltd., Cilgary, 
Alta. 
Grindstones 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Cleveland Stone Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Grindstone Fixtures 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 
Grinding Wheels 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Carborundiim Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Guns 

Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co.. Montreal. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Harrington & Richardson Anns Co., Worcester. 
Mass. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, Fitohburg 
.Mass. 
Gunsights 

Maitile Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, Mich. 
Hack Saws 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

L. 8. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 

Victor Saw Works, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
Hack Saw Blades 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Wks., Buffalo, N.I. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

Henry Disston & Sons, Ltd., Toronto. 

Victor Saw Works, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
Hack Saw Frames 

Canadian Fairbanks^Morse Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Briclgeport Hdwe, Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn 

Henry Disst-on & iSons, Ltd., Toronto. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Hack Saw Machines 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Wks., Buffalo, N.T 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

Victor Saw Works, Hamilton. 
Halters 

G. L. Griffith Son. Stratford, Ont 

Johnson Halter Co., Samia, Ont 

R. R. Kinread, Winnipeg, Man. 
Hammers 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Brockville. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Hammocks 

Gait Robe Co., Gait, Ont 
Hand Drills 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Handles 

J. H. Steel Mfig. Co., St Thomas, Ont. 
Hand Pulls 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Hangers, Door 

.\llith Mfff. Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton, Ont 

Beatty Bros., Ltd.. Fergus. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockvilie, On» 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton, Can. 

Cushman Motor Work. Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 

Alta. 
National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 
National Mfg. Co., Sterling HI. 
F. E. Myers & Bro.. Ashland, Ohio. 
The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Taylor-iFort>es Co., Quclph. Ont 
Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Hangers, Bam Door 

Allith Mfg. Co., Ltd., HamUton, Ont. 
Hansrers. Door and Track 

Allith Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Beatty Bros.. Fergus, Ont. 
Canada Steel Goods Co.. Hamilton. 
Cushman Motor Work. Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 
The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Hooks, Hat and C^at 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

Hangers, Storm, Sash and Screen 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 

The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 



Hand Taps 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait. 
Handscrews 

NaUonal Machinery & Supply Co., HamUton. 
Harness 

Samuel Trees & Co., Toronto. 
Hardware Specialties 

o",',"^ .,¥fs- Co.. Ltd., HamUton, Ont 

Belleville Hardware Mfg. Co., Belleville, Ont 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

Lyons & Marks, Toronto. 

Louis McLain Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, .Man. 

Metal Specialties Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratfoid, Ont 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
! 

Duluth Show Case Co., Duluth, Minn. 
Hardware Shelving 

Duluth Show Cass Co., Duluth, Minn. 
Hardware Store Fittings 

Stratford Brass Co., Ltd., Stratford, Out 
HateheU 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, 
Ont 

-Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, Mich. 
Hasps 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling 111. 
Headlights, Auto 

Canadian Lamp & Stamping Co., Ford, Ont 

North American Hardware Co,, Ltd., Montreal 
Que. 

Heaters 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Unu 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Jas. Stewart .Mfg. Co., Ltd., Woodstock, Ont. 
Heaters, Electric 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont 
Heels and Soles, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Hinges, Strap and Tee 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton, Can. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, 111. 
Hinges, Adjustable Ball 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Hockey Sticks 

J. H. Still Mfg. Co., St Thomas. 

St Mary's Wood Specialty Co., St Mary's, Ont 
Hoes 

Ward & Payne, Sheffield, Eng. 
Hoists 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Works, Ltd., Winnipe* 
Hones 

American Hone Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Horse Singers 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Hones, Razor 

The Carbonmdum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Horse Covers, Rubber 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Montreal. 
Horse Nails 

C. Kloepper, Limited, Toronto, Ont 
Horse Shoes 

D. Ackland & Son, Winnipeg. 

C. Klospper, Limited. Toronto, Ont 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Wilkin.wn & Kompass, Hamilton. 

Horse Shoe Pads 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Bose, Fittings and Supplies 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Mootreal. 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 

Caverhill. Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronito. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Gutta Percha & Rubber, Ltd., Toronto. 
Hollow Ware 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., BroekvUle, Ont 
Hooks and Sockets 

Williams & Co., J, H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Ice Scrapers 

James Bros. Co., Perth, Ont. 
Ice Cream Freezers 

Wm. Crane & Sons Co.. Ltd.. Newmarket. Ont. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Implement Repairs 

D. Ackland & Son, Ltd., Wlanlpeg. 
Incubators 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Cushman Motor 'Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Indicators, Speed 

H. Disston A Sen, Ltd., Toronto. 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 
Injectors, Automatic 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Instruments of Precision 

L. S. Starrett Co., ithol, Mass. 
Iron Enamels 

Boston Varnish Co., Everett Station, Boston, Ma«. 
Iron Boards 

J. E. Beauchamp & Co., Montreal. 
Iron. Corrugated 

Baines & Peckover. Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Wlnnipee. 
Iron Handles 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville. Ont 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



79 




China Wood Oil Tinplates 
Lithopone Spelter 

Blue Vitriol Borax 

Glycerine, Etc. 

We have the above in stock and 
can make immediate shipments. 

B.& S.H.THOMPSON 

a COMPANY LIMITED 
MONTREAL 

BranckM: TORONTO WINNIPEG NEW GLASGOW. N.S. 

Cuiadian SaU* Avcnts: United States Steal Product* Cem^MMr 
Exporter* for American Sheet & Tin Plate Company 



Show Her the Way 

T7OR goodness' sake, cries the average housewife, show 
-^ us how to save money out of the deluge of sky- 
high prices for meats, sugar, flour — everything. And 
seldom a thought has she of what a tidy sum can be 
saved every little while by checking up the honest 
mistakes of grocer, butcher, etc. Show her. 

Just a bit of enterprise, pushing the Renfrew Scale 
to the front — displaying it — and showing her how it 
soon pays for itself will stir up a tidy lot of sales 
worth while. Right now is the "pyschological moment." 
Clinch your sales by showing the Government In- 
spector's Certificate of correct weights accompanying 
every Renfrew. Scales supplied in black or all nickel- 
lated finish. The 



A Sturdy Broom 

A broom that bears the "Keystone" 
trade-mark has always been recog- 

nized as a 
good broom. 
One of the 
Keystone line 
especially de- 
signed for fac- 
tories is the 




Keystone 

Stapled 
Metal Case 

iiiiiiillll ^''00™ 

Write for prices to 

STEVENS-HEPNER CO.» LIMITED 

Port Elgin, Ontario 

Makers of the famous "Keystone" line 




Renfrew 



HOUSEHOLD 
SCALE 

Capacity 1/2 oz. to 30 lbs. 
Government inspector's 
certificate accompanies 
every scale. 

Write to-day for litera- 
ture and attractive sell- 
ing proposition to 

The Renfrew Machinery Co., Limited 

Head Office and Works, Renfrew, Ont. 
Eastern Branch : Sussex, N.B. 

Western Representatives : P. A. Mclntyre & Co., 1206 Mc- 

Arthur Bldg., Winnipeg, Man. ; Crandall Co., Ltd., Vancouver, 

B.C. 

Our Other Lines : "Renfrew" Cream Separators ; 2,000-lb. 

Farmers' Truck Scale, Tractors, Wood-Saws, Grain Grinders, etc. 



Sell Handles that 

are Most in 

Demand 

STILL'S 



There are more of STILL'S HANDLES sold in 
Canada than any other make. What's the 
logical conclusion of this fact? — they are the 
best. 

There's a Still Handle to meet every need : Axe, 
Pick, Sledge and Hammer Handles; Cant 
Hook and Peavie Handles. 

There's nothing like selling the best of every- 
thing. Oood profits in our handles, too. 

J. H. Still Mfg. Company 

ST. THOMAS -:- ONTARIO 



// ^ny advertisement interests you, tear it out yiow and place with letters to he answered. 



80 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



July 13, 1918 



Iron and Steel Bars 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 
Thos. Birketi & Son Co., L.td., Ottawa. 
Can. Rolling Mills Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
Cayenhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Dominion Iron & Steel Co., Sydney, N.8. 
A. C. Leslie & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 
London Rolling Milla, Loudon, Ont 
Manitoba Bridge & Iron (Works, iWlnnipeg, Man. 
Nora Scotia Steel Co., New Glasgow, JN.8. 
Toronto Look Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Iron and Steel, Structural 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 
Irons 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., BrockTille, 6nt. 
Irons, Gas and Gasoline 
Merchants Hardware Si)eciaKles, Ltd., Calgary, 

Alta. 
National Stamping & Electric Works, CJhioago. 
Royal Iron Mfg. Co., Big Prairie, Obte. 
Jack Planes 

National Machinery & Supply Co., Hamilton. 
Jack Screws 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, BrockTille, Ont 
Japans 

Boston Varnish Co., Ererett Station, Boston, Mass. 
Kettles 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 
Thos. DaTidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Keyhole Saws 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Kitchen Ware 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Kitchen Ware, Transparent 

Coming Olass Works, Coming, N.Y. 
Knife Sharpeners 

J. E. BeauGhamp & Co., Montreal. 
Knives, Pocket and Table 
Geo. Butler & Co., Ltd., Sheffield, Eng. 
Jonathan Crookes & Son, Ltd., Sheffield, Eng. 
James Hutton & Co., Montreal. 
Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Conn. 
Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 
Knives, Sportsmen's 

Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, Mich. 
Knives, Putty 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Ladders, Step, Extention, Store, etc. 
Allith .Mfg. Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
Beatty Bros., Ltd., Fergus, Ont. 
John Oalander Mfg. Co., St. Paul, Minn. 
Milbradt Mfg. Co., St Louis, Mo. 
KTan L. Reed Mfg. Ca, Srterling, 111. 
Lath, Metallic 
Barnes & Peckover, Toronto. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Lamps, Nitrogen and Tungsten 
Basters Jackson Co., Toronto. 
The Canadian Laco-Philips Co., Toronto. 
Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Churton & Taylor, Toronto. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 
Lamp Black 

L. Martin Co., New York, N.T. 
A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 
Wilkes^MartinJWilcke3 Co., New York. 
Lamp Chimneys 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Lamp Coloring: and Frosting 
Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. Man. 
Spielmann Agencies, Ltd., Montreal. 
Lamps, Bicycle and Automhobile 
Dominiop Battery Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Que. 
Lamps, Lariterns, Electric, Hand 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 
Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto. 
Domirion Battery Co., Toronto. 
Interstate Electric Novelty Co., Toronto. 
Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 
Lamps, Tungsten 
Canadian Daco-Ph''ips Co.. Toronto. 
Canadian Timgstet. Lamp Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 
North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Que. 
Lamps, Nitrogen 
Canadian Laco-Philips Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Tiragsten Lamp Co., Ltd., Hamilton, 

Toronto, Montreal. Winnipeg. 
North American Hardware Co., I/td., Montreal. Q. 
Lamps and Lanterns, Gasoline and Kerosene 
National Stamping & Electric Works, Chicago. 

HI 
North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Que. 
Powerlight Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Lanterns, Oil 

Thoe. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Otutario Lantern & Lamp Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Sdiultz Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Can. 

H. T. Wright Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Latches 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 

National M!fg. Co., Sterling, 111. 
Lathe Dogs, Drop-forged 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Laundry Tubs, Iron, Plate, Cement 

Bm,plre Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Lawn Swings 

J. E. Beauchamp & Co., Montreal. 
Lawn Mowers 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, Ltd.. Brockville. 

OMpper Lawn Mower Co., Dlion, HI. 

Mflbnidt MTg. Co., Sterling, lU. 

T«ylor-Fort>e» C«., Quelph, Ont. 



S. P. Townsend & Co., Orange, N.J. 
Lead, Black 

John Oakey & Sons, London, Eng. 
Leather Belting and Soles 

Beardmore & Co., Toronto. 
Lead, Sheets and Pipe 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Hoyt Metal Co., Toronto. 
▲. a Lealle & Co., Montreal. 
Lead Traps and Bends 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Empire Mfg. Co., (London and Toronto. 

Hoyt Metal Co., Toronto. 
Lace Leather 

Wm. Taylor, Parry Sound, Ont. 
Lead Washers 

Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Lens 

MoCee Glass Ca, BulTaJo, N.T, 

Stopglare Co., iRamllton, Can. 
Levels 

H. Diaston & Sons, Toronto. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

thanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

t. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 
Level Glasses 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Lines, Wire, Clothes 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 

Western Wire & Nail Co., London. 
Linoleum Finishes 

Bostan Varnish Co., Everett Station, Boston, Mass. 
Linseed Oil 

BrandramJIenderson, Montreal. 

Dominion Linseed Oil Co., Baden and Toronto. 

R. C. Jamieson & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Prairie City Oil Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Locomotive Tools 

WJlliam.s & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Lumber Tools 

Canadian Warren Axe & Tool Co., St. Cajthar- 
ines, Ont. 

Thos. Pink & Co., Pembroke, Ont 
Mantles, Gas 

Hamilton Gas Manitle Co., Hamilton, Can. 
Marine Brass Work 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Matches 

E. B. Eddy Co., Hull, Que. 
Mats, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Mauls 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 
Meat Choppers 

Landers, Frary & Clark. New Britain, Conn. 
Metal Boxes and Drawers 

Cameron & Campbell, Toronto. 
Metals, Expanded 

Baines & Peekover, Toronto, Ont 
Metals, Expanded, Ingot, Sheet, Tubes, etc. 

Atlas Metals & Alloys Co., Montreal. 

Baines & Peckovcr, Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Hoyt Metal Co., Toronto. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton, Can. 

A. C. Leslie & Co., Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Metallic, Ceilings, Walls, Roofing, Skylights. 
Siding, Cornices, Ventilators, Valley Windows. 
Doors, etc. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Pedlar People, Oshawa. Ont. 

Winnipeg CeUing & Roofing Co., Winnipeg. 
Mica 

A. G. Martin, Ottawa, Ont. 
Menders, Utensils 

Collette Mfg. Co., Collingwood. 

H. Nagle Co., Montreal. 
Meters 

Canadian General Electric Co.. Toronto. 
Menders, Graniteware, Pot and Pan 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 

Vol-Peek Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Micrometers 

Goodell-Pratt Co.. Greenfield, Mass. 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Canadian Fairt)ank3-Morse Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Milling Cutters 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Ltd., Dundas. 
Milk Cans 

Thns. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Mirrors 

Leeks & Potts, I/td., Hamilton, Ont. 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., Toronto. 
Mitre Boxes 

Oorvlell-Pratt Co.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Stanlpv Rule & Level Co.. Npw Britain. Ponn 
Mitre Box Saws 

TT. nUitoTi & Sons. Ltd.. Tornnto. 
Molasses Gates 

Can. Fotindries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville. On* 
Mops 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont 
Motor Trucks 
Canadian Pneumaitic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Ford Motor Co., Ford Ont. 
Motors 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 
Motor Cycles 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, Fltchburg. 

Mass. 
North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Motor Trucks 
Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 



Motor Generators 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg Man. 
Northern Electne Co., Aloatreal. 
Nails, Wire 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co., Ltd., Msatreu. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 

Colonial Wire Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

H. S. Howland> Sons & Co., Toronta. 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Ltd., HamUtoa. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., HamiltOB, 0«t, 

Parmenter & Bulloch, Uananoque, Out. 

Western Wire & Nail Co., Lon(too. 
Nail Pullers 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridg^ort, Cona. 
Nails, Horse Shoe 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., HaiallteB, Oai. 
Neckyokes 

Gregg Mfg. Co., IM., Winnipeg, Man. 
Nuts, Thumb 

Williams & Co., J. H., Bi'ooklyn, N.Y. 
Oil Cans 

Cannon Oiler Co., Keithsburg, 111. 
Oil Cake and Heal 

Uommion Linseed UU Co., Toronto. 
Oil, Coal 

Imperial Oil Co., Toronto. 
Oils, Cylinder 

Prairie City Oil Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Oil Hole Covers 

Canadian Winkley Co., Windsor. 
Oil, Motor, Road, Harness, Neatsfoot, Separ- 
ator and gas Engine 

Prairie City Oil Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Oil Stoves 

Thos. Davidson .Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Oil Tanks and Pumps 

8. F. Bowser & Co., Inc., Toronto, Can. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Oilers 

Cannon OUer Co., Keitk^urg, 111. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada, Toronto. 
Orange Derinders 

J. E. Beauchamp & Co., Montreal. 
Ornamental Tile Roofings 

Metallic Roofing Co.. Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Ornaments, Pressed Zinc 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Ornamental Fence 

Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ltd., HajBilton 

McGregor, Banwell Fence Co., Ltd., Walkerrillt. 
Ornamental Gates 

McGregor, Banwell Fence Co., Ltd., Walkervill* 
Packings 

Constimers Cordage Co., MontreaL 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 

Scythes, Ltd., Toronto. 
Paint, Ready Mixed, Bam, Roof, Flat Wall, 
Concrete, Floor, Cement, Alnminam, Haria* 

Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

R. C Jamieson & Co., Montreal. 

Imperial Varnish & Color Co., Toronto. 

Lowe Bros, Ltd., Toronto. 

Martin-Senour Co., Montreal. 

McArthur-Irwin, Ltd. 

The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 

Sanderson, Pearcy Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Standard Paint & Varnish Co., Ltd., Windsor. 
Ont 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

G. F. Stephens Co., Winnipeg. 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Toronto. 
Paint Brushes 

Boeckh Bros., Toronto. 

.VIeakins & Sons, Hamilton. 

T. S. Simms & Co., St. John, N.B. 
Paint and Varnish Remover 

Canada Paint Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

DougaU Varnish Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

R. C. Jamieson & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Martin-Senour Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal. 

Paper Balers 

Climax Baler Co., Hamilton. 

Spielmann Agencies, Montreal. 
Parcel Carriers 

Gipe-Hazard Store Service Co., Montreal. 
Paris Green 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

McArthur Irwin, Montreal. 

Sherwin Williams Co., Montreal. 
Paper Bags 

Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Paper, Wrapping 

Waltei- Woods & Co., Hamilton. 
Packing Rubber 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Co., Toronto. 

Gutta Percha & Robber Co., (Ltd., Toronto. 
Pads 

D. Ackland & Sons, Winnipeg. 
Pads for Horses 

American Pad & Textile Co., Chatham. 

Burlington Windsor Blanbet Co., "PorontOL 
Pails 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Soren Bros., Toronto. 
Pails, Wooden 

Wtn. Cane & Sons Co., Ltd., Newmarket, Ont. 
Perforated Sheet Metals 

B. Greening Wirs Co., lAA., 'Hamilton. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



81 




'Silent Salesman" B 
Display Board 

Length 54 Inches 

6 Wrenches Each 

Size 



This Is No Free Offer of 

Williams' Superior 

Drop-Forged Wrenches 

It is but another evidence of 
J. H. Williams & Co.'s policy to 
make your display and sale of 
Williams' Wrenches attractive 
and profitable. We shall be well 
paid for the board in the in- 
creased business we acquire 
through your use of it, and in 
the added satisfaction it affords 
you and your trade. 

You Buy the Wrenches 

a carefully selected assortment 
that provides the widest range 
of usefulness. Their finish and 
physical qualities are unexcelled 
and they enjoy a larger con- 
sumer demand among mechanics 
than all others combined. 

We have additional Display 
Boards of this and other types, 
fully described in our "Silent 
Salesman" Booklet; it's free, 
with your imprint if desired. 

J. H. Williams & Co., 

"The Wrench People" 
30 Richards St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

The A. G. Low Co., Ltd., 
30 Pacific Ave., Saskatoon, Sask. 

Agents for Manitoba, Saskatchewan, 
Alberta and British Columbia. 




"Oh, That Reminds Me!" 

Not only is Hardware Shelving for the storage of merchandise, 
but its one big function is to draw and attract trade — to remind 
those who enter the store of things they need or should have. 
Shelving: with display simplifies hardware selling. It makes shop- 
ping easy for your customers, showing them at a glance the very 
articles they have in mind, saving your clerk's time and their own 
in making quick selections. 

"DULUTH" SECTIONAL HARDWARE SHELVING 
is more than ordinary shelving, it is a salesforce in itself that 
cannot be ignored by the wide-awake merchant of to-day — and it 
isn't as costly as you may think. 

Ask for our complete catalog No. IOC, that explains that Duluth 
Systems of Hardware Displays. 

DULUTH SHOW CASE COMPANY 

DULUTH. MINNESOTA, U.S.A. 



C TRADE ^^M^ 

HICACQ 
MARK ^Hii^: 

SPRING HINGES 

A SUGGESTION 

Have you a stock of Spring Hinges that have 
distinctive selling features which your salesman 
can offer and which would make the prospective 

purchaser buy them and no 

other? 

Chicago"Triplex" 
Spring Butts 

offer this advantage to you. 
The appearance, durability and 
finish of this article are unsur- 
passed, and in consideration of 
prices that are conservative in respect to value, 
the up-to-date dealer cannot afford to neglect this 
profitable business. 

Send for Catalogue M. 32. It fully tllustratea and describu 
the most complete line of Sprinc HinKoa manDfaetnrod. 




CHICAGO 




NEW YORK 



HORSE COLLAR PADS 




Sell Best 

During Warm Weather 

During summer months TAPATCO 
BRAND Collar Pads are particu- 
larly in demand in preventing 
*'sore shoulder." 

TAPATCO PADS, on which we 
have an exclusive patent, are guar- 
anteed to be of excellent cotton 
drill — of long endurance against 
heavy wear and filled with our 
specially prepared stuffing ma- 
terial. Guaranteed to insure horse 
comfort during the summer 
months. 

Order now through your dealer. 

The American Pad & Textile Co. 

CHATHAM, ONTARIO 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



82 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



Percolators, Coffee 

Canadian General Eletric Co., Toronto. 

Great West Jilectric <Jo., Ltd., Winnipeg, Uan 

Landeia, Frary & dark. New Britain, Oena. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Pick Handles 

J. U. dtill Mfg. Co.. St. Thomas, OnL 
Pickling Machines 

Ciishman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Piston Rod Pocking: 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Pistols 

iTcr Johnson's Anna & Cycle Works, Fltohlnuig 
Mass. 
Phosphor Tin and Copper 

Canada Metal Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Phonographs - 

Canadian Fhonoerapli & Sapphire Disc Co. 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Daminlon Sewing MachlBC-Phoncgraph Oe., Wtn 
nipeg 
Pig Iron 

A. C Leslie & Co., Ltd., aiontreel 

NOTS Bootla Steel Co., New Glasgow, N.S. 

Steel Ca of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Pins, Escutcheon 

Parmenter & Bulloch, Oananoque 

Pipe Cotters (Stand) 

TrimoBt Mlg. Co., Roxbarj (Boston), Mess. 
Pipe Stocks and Dies 

Wells Bros. Co., of Oansda, Ltd., Qslt 
Pipe, Black and Galranized 

American Rolling Mills, Middletown, Ohio. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal 

CaTerhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Omt 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 

Pease Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Pipe, Galvanized, Conductor 

Metallic Roofing Oe., Toronto and Winnipeg 

Pedlar People, Ltd., Oshawa 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Wheeler & Bain, Toronto. 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co., Winnipeg 

Winnipeg Steel Granary Co., Winnipeg. 

Pipe, Lead 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 
Hoyt Metal Co., Toronto 
Pipe, Stove 
Oellins Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Soren Bros., Toronto 

Pipe, Rain Water Conductor 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto 

Pliers, Cutting 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Pliers, Combination 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Ooodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Plowshares 

D. Ackland ft Son, Winnipeg 

Plugs, Rubber 

Canadian Consolidated Rabl>er Co., Montreal 

Plumbers' Tools 

Elmipire <Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Plumbers' Supplies, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & RuWber Goods (3o., Ltd., Toronto. 

Planes 

Carerhill, Learmont & Co., iMontreal 
National Machinery ft Supply Co., Hamilton. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Plates, Plain and Chequererd 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 

Polishes 

Buffalo Specialty Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Channel Chemical Co., ToronitOL 
Polishing Heads 

OoodelliPratt Co., Greenfleld, Mass. 
Polishes, Knife 

Jno. Oakey ft Sons, Ijondon, Ihig. 
Poles, Electric Light 

Northern Eleetrlo Co., Montreal 
Pole Line Material 

Canadian General Bleotrte Co., Ltd., Toronte 

Great West Electric O., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal 

Pedlar People Ltd., Osfaawa 

Metallie Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg. 
Portable Coal Baskets 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Poultry Netting 

Thoe. Birkett & Son C!o., Ltd., Ottawa. 

A. 0. Leslie & Co.. Ltd., Montreal 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamflton. 
Poultry Leg Bands 

Rldeau Specialty Co., Smith's Falls, Out. 
Pulte 

Can. Poundries ft Poigings, Ltd., BrockvUle, Ont. 
Pumps 

Beatty Bros., Ltd.. Fsmu 

Otn. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., BrockvUle, Ont. 

Empire Mfg. Co., London. Ont. 

B. McDoTigall Co.. Ltd., Gait 

F. E. Myera A Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Pump Oilers 

Cannon Oiler Co.. Kelthsburg, 111. 
Punches, Centre Drive, etc. 

Goodell-Pratt Co., OreenfleM. Mass. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New Britain. Cnnn 
Punches, Ticket 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport. Conn. 



Putty 

Brandram-Hendeison, Montreal. 

R. C. Jamieson & Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal 

Benjamin uVloore & Co., Ltd., Toronto 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., .Montreal 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

G. F. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Jtlontreal 
Pneumatic Tubes 

Gipe Hazard Store Service Co., Toronto 
Pulleys 

Canada Foundries & Forgings, BrockvUle 
Quoits 

Can. Foundries & Forgings. Ltd., BrockvUle, Ont. 
Racks, Hay 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., BrockvUle, Oni. 
Radiators 

tfimpire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Radiator Valves 

Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Railings, Brass 
Railroad Supplies, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto 

The Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto, Ont 
Rakes 

Doust Specialty Co., Toronto. 

Ward & Payne, Sheffield, Eng. 
Razors 

Anto-Strop Safety Razor Co., Toronto 

Geo. BuUer ft Co., Ltd., She.. eld, Eng. 

Caverhill. Learmont & Co., Montreal 

James Hutton ft Co.. Montreal 

Gillette Safety Razor Co., Ltd.. Montreal 

Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Cons. 

Wilkinson Sword Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Reamers 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Ltd., Dundas 

Butterfield ft Co.. Rock Island, Que. 
Ratchet Drills 

Goodell-Pratt Co.. Greenfleld, Mass. 
Reciprocating Drills 

Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfleld. Mass. 
Refrigerators 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Renfrew Refrigerator Co., Renfrew, Ont. 

Soren Bros., Toronto 
Refrigerator Hardware 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Registers 

Barton Netting Co.. Ltd.. Windsor. OnL 
Canada Foundries ft Forgings, Brocbvillc 

Enterpri-te Mfg. Co., SaokrUle. N.B. 

Ja». Stewart Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont 
Rifles 

Harrington ft Richardson Arms Co., Worcester. 
Mass. 
Rivets 

Parmenter BiilloCh Co., Oananoque, Ont. 
Roadlighters 

C. A. Shaler Co. 
Roofing. Ready 

Bird ft Son. HamUton. Can. 

Bishopric Wall Board Co., Ltd., Ottawa, Ont. 

TJios. Birkptt * Son C".. Ltd.. Ottawa. 

Brantford Roofing Co., Ltd., Brantford, ©at 

Canadian Roofing Co.. Ltd.. Windsor, Ont 

Standard Paint Co., of Canada, !Ltd., Montreal. 
Rules 

Jas. Chesterman & C!o., She.. eld, Eng. 

Lufkin Rule Co.. Windsor. Ont. 

L. a. Starrett Co.. Aithol. Mass. 
Saws. Han<1 anrt Circular 

E. C. Atkins Co., Hamilton. Can. 

Henry Disston & Sons. Toronto. 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Montreal. 
Scoops 

Canadian Shovel & Tool Co., HamUton, Can. 
Screws 

(Tan. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd., BrockvUle, On' 
Screws, Thumb 

Williartw & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Screw and Bolt Cases 

Duluth Show Case 0»., Dtduth, Minn. 
Screw Machines 

Stratford Bra.i5 Co., Ltd., Stratford, Ont. 
Shades. Electric 

Canadian General Electric C3o., Tnrsnto. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Mat). 
Sheeting 

McArthnr & Co.. Alex., Montreal, Que. 
Sheets. Galvanized and Black 

American RrJling Mills. Mlddleton, Ohio. 

Baines & Peckover. Toronto. 

A. C. Leslie ft Co., Montreal. Que. 
Dominion Sheet Meifal Co., HaroiWon. 
M. & L. Samuel Benjamin Co., Toronto. 

B. ft S. H. Thompson, Montreal, Que. 
Shovels 

J. E. Beaiichamp & Co., Montreal, Que. 

Canadian flhovel ft Tool Co., HamUton, Can. 
D. P. Jones Mfg. Co., Ltd., Gananoque, Out, 
Show Cages 

Duluth Show Case (5o., Duluth, Mlna. 
Silo Lues 

Otterville MTg. Co., Ottervffle. Ont 
Sinks 

Can. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd., BrockvUle, Ont. 

Kmpire Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Silver Plated Ware 

Canadian Wm. A. Rocera Co., Toronto. 

Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls. Ont. 
Solder 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto 

F.mTiIrp Mfe. Co.. London and Toronto 

TTovt Metal Co.. Toronto 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal 

OtvI Metal C6.. Ltd.. Winnipeg 

rson. W. Reed, Montreal 

Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton. Ont 



Soldering Paste 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man. 
Solderall 

Thos Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 
Soap Dishes 

Kluzinger Bruce & Co., Niagara FaUs, Ont 
Spades 

Canadian Shovel & Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Erie Iron Works, St. Thomas, Ont 
Spark Plugs 

Canadian Carbon Co., Ltd.. Toronto 

Canada Cycle ft Motor Co., Ltd., Weston, Ont 

Canada Sales Co., Toronto, Can. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Champion Spark Plug Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Dominion Battery Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont 

Eclipse Mfg. Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

W. T. Evans, 1684 St Urbaia at, Montreal 

Hyslop Bios. , Toronte 

Interstate Electric Novelty Co., Montreal 

.\orthem Electric Co., Ltd., Toisnte 

Sharp Spark Plug Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 
Spanners 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Spiders 

Can. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd., BrsckviUe, Ont 
Spoke Shaves 

Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New Britain, Ocan. 
Sponge Baskets 

Kinzinger, Bruce ft Co.. Niagara FaUs, Ont 
Sprayers 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Eureka Planter Co., Woodstock 
Springs 

B. J. Coghlin Co., Ltd.. Montreal, Que. 
Spring Dies 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Qalt 
Stable Finings 

Beatty Bros., Fergus, Ont 

Canada Foundries ft Forgiao, BrockvUle. 

Toronto Lock Mfg. CX>., Toronto. 
Stains 

Brandram-Henderson, Montreal 

Canada Paint Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Dougall Varnish Co., Ltd., Montreal 

The Lowe Bros. Co., Toronto 

R. C. Jamieson & CIo., Ltd., Montreal 

.Martin-Senour Co., Ltd., Montreal 

McArthur-Irwin, Ltd. 

Benjamin Moore ft Co., Ltd., Toronto 

A. Ramsay ft Sons Co., Montreal 

The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa. 

Sanderson Pearcy & Co., Toronto. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal 

Standard Paint & Vamidi Co., Windsor Ont. 

Spielman Agencies Ltd., Montreal 

G. F. Stephens ft Co., Winnipeg 
Staples 

Canada Steel Goods Co.. HamUton 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co.. Ltd., HamUton 

National Mfg. Co., Sterling, lU. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., HamUton 

Western Wire ft NaU Co., London 
Store Fixtures 

Cameron & Camplbell, Toronto. 

MUbradt Mfg. Co., Steriing, HI. 

Walker Bin ft Store Fixtflre Co., Kitchener, Ont. 
Stoves 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne. HamUton, Can. 

Canada Foundries & Forgings. BrookrUle. 

Thos. Davidson MTg. 0>., Ltd.. Montietl. 

Enterprise Foundry Co.. Sackvflle, N.B. 

Gumey Foundry Co., Toronto 

Hoosier Stove Co., Marion, Ind. 

McClary Mfg. Co., London. Ont 

Merchants Hardware Specialties, Ltd., Cilgary, 
Alta. 

Record Foundry ft Machine Co., Moneton, N.B. 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Weodstaek 
Stoves, Fireless Cook 

Louis MtiLain Co.. Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man. 
Stoves and Ranges, Electric 

Superior Electrics, Ltd., Pembroke, Ont 
Stoves, Gasoline 

National Stamping ft Electric Works, CJhloago 
Stove Lining 

Geo. W. Reed, Montreal. 
Stove Pipe 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada, Toronto. 
Stretchers, Wire 

Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co.. T,td.. Hamiltnn 

Merchants Hardware Specialities, Ltd., Calgary, 
Alta. 
Steel, Reinforcing 

Baines ft Peckover.,, Toronto. 

Canadian Rolling MUls Co.. Ltd.. Montreal 

Canadian Tube ft Iron Co.. Ltd., Montreal 

London Rolling MUl Co.. London. Ont 

Manitoba Rolling MIUs Co., Winnipeg 

Steel, Strip 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. Ont. 
Dominion Sheet Metal Ck)., Ltd., Hamilton 

Stencils and Ink 

Hamilton Stamp ft StencU Co., HamUton 

Steamers and Boilers 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Steel Bending Brakes 

Steel Bending Brake Works. Chatbam 
Steel. Mild, Sleigh Shoe, Tiro 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto, Ont. 
Canadian Rolling MUls Co., Ltd., Montreal 
(Canadian Tuibe ft Iron Co.. Ltd.. Montreal 
London BolUne Mill Co.. London, Ont. 
Manltotia Rolline Mill." Co.. Winnipeg 
Steel Co. of Canada, HamUten 



Juiv 13, 1918 



HARDWAEE AND METAL 



83 





For Your Sporting Goods Trade 
Guns Rifles Revolvers 

Our comprehensive stock gives you choice of a wide range for 
every Sporting requirement. Under present conditions, and 
difficulties to secure deliveries of fire-arms from the factories, we 
think every dealer would be wise to get our stock list and place 
his orders NOW. 

We list here some of our Leading Lines : 

Rifles Shot Guns 



Remington 

Winchester 

Stevens 

Marlin 

Savage 

Hamilton 



Harrington & Richardson 

Stevens 

Winchester 

Remington 

Marlin 



Revolvers and Pistols 



Harrington & Richardson Revolvers. 



Colt's Automatic Pistols. 



We still have in stock a few Belgian Single and Double 
Barrel Shot Guns, Mauser and Flobert Single Shot Rifles 
which we oflfer at BARGAIN PRICES. 
We also can supply your requirements in Shell and Cart- 
ridge Bags and Belts, Gun and Rifle Cases, Reloading 
Tools, Compasses, Clay Pigeons, Hunters' Axes, and in 
fact almost everything to make your stock complete and 
attractive. 

We always have an exceptionally large stock of "VICTOR" 
Game Traps. 

Your orders for Arms, Accessories, Repairs or Ammunition 
will receive our careful attention. 




_ — — — -~ ^ 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with tetters to be answered. 



84 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
THE BUYERS' GUIDE 



July 13, 1918 



Stays, Frietian 

Toronto Lock 'Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Stools 

Evan L. Beed Mfg. Co., aierling, HI. 
STUCCO BOARD 

Bishopric Wail Board Co., Iitd,, Ottawa, Out. 
Sweat Pads 

American Pad & Textile Co., Chatham 

Biirlmgcon Windsor Blanket Co., Toronto. 
Switches, Switchboards 

Canadian General Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Northern Electne Co., Montreal. 

Supply Pipes, Iron and Brass, Bath and Basin 

Empire Mfg. Co., London. Ont. 

Talking Machines 

DommioD Sewing Machine & Phonograph Co. 
Winnipeg 
Tanka, Cistern 

Oan. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brookrllle, Ont. 
Tanks, Galranizcd Steel 
I Knt^ra Jlfg. Oa, London and Toronto 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Hooang Co., Winnipeg 
'Tape 
' Batterfleld Sc Co., Rock Mand, Que. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait, Ont. 
Tap Holders 

Ooodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, MaM. 

North BroL Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

'Tapping Attachments 

i Pratt Jc fWhltney Co., Dundas, Ont. 

; Wdls Bros, ot Canada, Gait 

I Tape, Rubber Friction 

I Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
:Tapes, Heasnring 

OereiMll, Leannont & Co., Montreal 
; Jos. Chesterman & Co., Ltd., Bheffleld, Eng. 
; Lufkin Rule Co.. Ltd., Windsor, Ont. 
" L. S. SUrrett Co., Athol, Mass. 
Tea Pots and Urns, Tea Ball 

Landers, Frary A dark. New Britain, Conn. 
Teme Plates 

: A. 0. Leslie & Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Thimbles, Smoke Pipe 

[^Oan. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockyille, Ont. 
friling. Walls and Floor 

Barton Netting Co., Windsor 
Tiling, Rubber 
' Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Ontta Perdha ft Rubber Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Tinsmiths' Machinery 

Brown, Boggs Co., Hamilton, OnL 

Steel Bending Brake Works, Chatliam. 
Tire Carriers, Antemoblle 

Klnzinger Bruce ft Co., Niagara Falls, Ont. 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Tires and Tubes, Automobile and Motor Truck 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., Montreal. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Oatta Pereha A Rubber Co., Toronto. 

MoOraw Tire ft Rubber Co., ISast Palestine. O 

North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Tires and Tubes, Bicycle 

Dunlop Tire & BuWber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Tire Accessories 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Trucks 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Truck Supplies 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Tools 

Bixsk Bros., MUlbury, Mase. 

Canadian Fairtianks-Morae Co., I^td. , Montreal. 

Jas. Cbesterman ft Co., Ltd., Bheffleld, Eng. 

B. J. Coghltn Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Nortkem Blectrio Co., Montreal. 

Norl* Bros. Mfg. Co.. PhBadelphls, Pa. 

Pratt & Whitney, Dundas, Out. 

Ward & Payne, Sheffield, Eng. 
Tools, Garden 

Eureka Planter Co., Woodstock 

Ward ft Payne, Sheffl^M, Eng. 
Tools, Harrest 

Beatty Bros., Ltd., Fergus, (tet. 

F. S. Myers ft Bra., Adiland, O. 
Tool Holders 

Williams & Co., .T. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Tays 

American Flyer Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

J. 1. Beancbamp ft Co., Montreal 

A. C. Gilbert Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Tools, Blacksmiths' 

D. Ackland ft Son, Winnipeg. 
Teela, Machinists' 

L. S. Btarrett Co., Athol, Mtas. 

Ooodell-PrBtt Co.. Greenfldd, Mass. 

Jas. dieetennan ft Co., Ltd., fiheffldd, Bng. 

Tools, Woodworkers' 
IfaHonal Machinery ft Supply Oo., Handltsa 

Towel Bars 

KlnelMgrr Bmce ft Co., Niagara Vans, Oat. 

Newell IMfg. Co., Pressott, Ont. 
Traps, Brass, Iron, Lead 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

JDinplre Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Traps, Game 

Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls, Ont 
Troughs 

Beatty Bros., Ferrna, Ont. 



Trammel Points 

Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New Britain. Cons. 
Trowels 
H. Disston ft Sons, Toronto 

Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Corp., Bridgeport, Comi. 
Ward & Payne, Sheffield, Eng. 
Trucks, Warehouse 
Canada Foundries ft Forgings, Brookvllle 
John Watson (Mfg. Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Try Squares 
Henry Disston & Sons Co., Toronto 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Briuln, Conn. 
Truing Devices 

Cleveland atone Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
Tungsten Lamps 
Canadian Tungsten Lamp Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
Canadian Laco-Phlllips Co., Toronto 
Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Winnipeg. (Man 
North American Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
Turning Tools 

Buck Bros., Milbury, Mass. 
Ward & Payne, Sheffield, Eng. 
Tabs 

Wm. Cane & Sons Co., Litd., Newmarket, Ont 
Tumbler Holders 

Kinsinger Bruce & Co., Niagara Falls, Ont. 
Tubing, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Tubing, Steel 

Standard Tube & Fence Co., Woodstock 
Twines 
Consumers Cordage Co., Montreal 
Scythes & Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Walter Woods & Co., Hamilton 
Valve Stamps 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Valves, Standard, Globe, Angle and Check 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Jenkins Bros., Montreal, Que. 
Ja«. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
T. Mc.4.vity ft Sons, Ltd., St. John, N.B. 
Penbenthy Injector Co., Limited. Windsor, Ont. 
United Brass Founders, Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 
Valves, Radiator and Air, Iron Body, Com- 
position, Globe, Angle, Check 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal, Que 
Oan. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Brockville, Ont. 
Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Jenkins Brass Co., Montreal, Que. 
Jas. Morrison Brass vMfg. Co., Toronto 
T. McAvity & Sons, Ltd., St John, N.B. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Limited, (Windsor, Ont. 
United Brass Founders. Ltd., Manchester, Eng. 
Varnishes 

Berry Bros., Walkerville 

Boston Varnish Co., Everett Station, Boston. 
Brandram-Henderson, Montreal 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal 
Dougall Varnish Co., Ltd., Montreal 
.McArthur Irwin. Montreal 
Martln^enour Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Benjamin Moore ft Co.. Ltd., Toronto 
A. Ramsay & Son, Montreal 
R. C. Jamieson & Co., Montreal 
Pratt ft Lambert, Bridgeburg, Ont. 
Sanderson, Pearcy & Co., Toronto. 
Sberwin- Williams Co., Montreal 
G. F. Stephens & Co., Ltd., Winnipeg 
Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa. 
WilkinsoB & Kompass, Hamilton 
Vehicles, Business 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co.. Ltd., Montreal, Q. 
Ventillatorg. Metallic 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto and Winnipeg 
Winnipeg Ceiling ft Roofing Co., Winnipeg 
Vises 
Thos. Birkett & Son Co., Ltd., Ottawa. 
Oan. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd,, Brookvllle, Ont. 
CaverhUl, Leannont & Co., Montreal 
Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield, Mass. 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
National Machinery ft Supply Co., Hamilton 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New Britain, Conn. 
Vises, Pipe 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Vulcanizers 

Ad.imson Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Northern Electric Co.. Montreal 
C. A. ShaJer Co., Waupun, Wis. 
Wagon Hardware 

Gregg Mfg. Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 
Wagons 

Woodstock Wagon Mfg. Co.. Woodstock, Ont. 
WALLBOARD 

Bishopric Wall Board Co., Ltd., Ottawa, Ont. 
Warmers, Foot 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., iCTilcago, 111. 
Washers 
Beauchamp & Co., J. E., Montreal, Que. 
C. KIoepfcT, Ltd., Toronto 
The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 
The Toronto Lock Mfg, Co., Toronto, Ont 
Wilkinson ft Kompass, Hamilton 

Washers, Rubber 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Toronto. 



Washing Machines, Electric, Hand and Power 

Beatty Bros,, Fergus, Ont 

Canadian Woodenware Co., St Thomas, Ont 

J. H. Connor & Son, Ltd., Ottawa 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd., Winnii)eg, Man. 

Dowswell, Lees & Co., Hamilton. 

Great West Electric Co., Ltd., Wtnnipee. Man 

Maytag Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Merchants Hardware Specialties, Ltd., Calgary, 

Alta. 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal 
Waste, Cotton 

Acme Waste Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Scythes & Co., Ltd., Toronto 

WUkinson & Kompass, Hamilton 
Wash Boards 

Canadian Woodenware Co., 8t. Thomas. Oat. 

Wm, Cane & Sous Co., Ltd., Newmarket, Ont 
Water Supply Systems 

Empire Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Weather Stripping 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Ltd., Torontx 
Swan Mfg, Co., Winnipeg 
Wedges 

Can. Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Breckrille, Oat 

Canadian Warren Axe ft Tool Co., Ot Ohtfaar- 
ines, Onrt, 

Whitewash Outfits 

Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Spramotor Co., London, Ont. 
Weeders, Garden (hand) 

J. E. Gilson Mfg. Co., Port Washlngfton, Wis. 

C. S. Norcross & Sons, Bushnell, IB. 
Weights 

Oan. Foimdries & Forgings, Ltd., BrockriUe, Oat 
Wheels, Well 

Can. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd,, Breekvflle, Oat. 
Wholesale Hardware 

Thos. Birkett & Co., Ottawa, Ont 

CaverhUl, Leannont & Co., Montreal 

Frothingham & Workman, Montreal 

H. S. Howland Sons ft Co., Toronto, 

Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 

MillerJMorse Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

Rice, Lewis & Sons, Ltd., Toronto 

White's, Ltd., Collingwood, Ont 
White Lead 

Brandram-Henderson, Montreal 

Canada Paint Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Carter White Lead Co., Montreal 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamlltea 

McArthur Irwin, Montreal 
Windows, Kalamelned 

Metallic Roofing Co,, Toronto and Wiaaipag 
Windshields 

Leeks ft Potts, Hamilton, Ont. 
Wire Cloth 

B. Greening Wire Cloth Co., Ltd., HamJHoa 
Wire Cutters 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Oeaa. 

Northern Electric Co., Montreal 

Wire Hoops 

Laidlaw Bale- Tie Co., Ltd., Hamlltoa 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham&ton 
Wire 

Canadian Tube ft Iron Co., Ltd., Montnal 
CaverhUl, Learmont & Co.. Montreal 
B. Greening Wire Cloth Co., Ltd., Hamlltoa 
Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Northern Electric Co., Montreal 
Northern Bolt Screw & Wire Co., Owen Saoad 
Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton 
Western Wire ft Nail Co., London 
Wire Mats 

B. Greening Wire Cloth Co., Ltd., Hanlltsa 
Wire Wheels 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Wire Rope 

Baines & Peckover, Toronto. 
Wrapping Paper 

McArthur & Co., Alex., Montreal, Quo. 
Wrenches and Accessories 

Can. Foundries ft Forgings, Ltd., BrookrlUe, Oait 
Ooodell-Pratt Co.. Greenfield, Mass. 
Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.T. 
L. S. Starratt Co., Athol, Mass. 
Trimont Mfg. Co., Roxtoury, Mass. 
Will B. Lane. Chicago. 111. 
J. H. Williams Co., Brooklyn. N.T. 
Wrench Sets 

Williams & Co.. J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
Wrenches, Alligator 

Bridgeport Hardware Co., Bridgeport, Oeaa. 
Wrenches. Ratchet 
L. S. Starretb Co., Atho!, Maa. 
Spielman Agencies, Montreal 
Wrought Nipples 

Canadian Tube ft Iron Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Wrought Couplings 

Canadian Tuibe ft Iron Co., Ltd., MantrsaJ 
Wringers, Hand and Power 
Beatty Bros., Fergus, Ont. 
CaverhUl, Learmont ft Co., Montreal 
Dowswell, Lees ft Co., Hamilton. 
J. H. Connor & Sons. Ltd., Ottawa 
Lewis Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal 

Merchants Hardware SpeciaDtiee, Ltd., Calgaiy. 
Alta. 
Zinc. Bar 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd., Tergate 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



8S 



GERMANTOWN 

LAMPBLACKS 



IN 

ENGLAND and AMERICA 

Originators of Eagle, Old 
Standard, Globe and Pyramid 
Germantown Brands. 

Suppliers of Bulk Blacks to 
the highest class Grinding 
Trade. 



THE L. MARTIN CO. 



Montreal Toronto 

Philadelph^A New York 

Winnipeg 

London, Eng. 




Manufacturers 



OF 



WIRE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Wire Bale Ties 

LARGEST CAPACITY AND STOCK 
IN CANADA 

Prompt Shipment 

LAIDLAW BALE TIE 
COMPANY, Limited 

HAMILTON, CANADA 

Winnipeg Toronto Montreal 

London, England 



Here's the strongest Ratchet Drill made 

Bridge builders, ship builders, boiler makers, and all who ask constant heavy service from 
Ratchet Drills are proving the "Monarch" Sciuare Sleeve Single Acting Ratchet to be the 
strongest Ratchet made. The body is made of Drop-forged Steel, and handle of solid Bar 
Steel. Parts subjected to wear are extra hardened. This is the ideal Ratchet Drill for 
heavy work. 

Remember that a Ratchet is almost useless without a drilling Post. Therefore always 
suggest with every sale a "Keystone" Drilling Post. It will save many hours of time and 
permit of more perfect work. 

"Keystone" Tools are known everywhere for <iuaHty of material and workmanship. If your 
jobber cannot supply you, write direct xo us. 

The KEYSTONE MFG. Co. 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Postal Station B. 



"KEVSTONE" 

Drilling Post or 

"OLD MAN" 





E. Roy, 
65^2 St. Andre St., Montreal, Que. 




MADE 

IN 



CANADA 



C. C. Cartwright, 

85 Water St., Winnipeg, Man. 




4 



Good Reasons 

—READ EM! 



Why you should sell Rolled Thread Bolts and 

Screws : 



BETTER QUAiLITY— Rolled Thread Bolts can 
only be made from first quality Basic Opeo- 
Hearth Stock. 

STRONGER— Actual tests show 13 per cent, 
greater strength than Cut Thread Bolts. 



THE NORTHERN BOLT, SCREW AND WIRE COMPANY, LIMITED 



NO USELESS WBIGHT-ahankB are 

than threads. No useless weight to pay freight 

on. 

BIG FIRIM.3 ADOPTING THEM— Some of the 
largest users on the oontineot will accept noth- 
ing else— and they always investigate kefore 
acting. 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



86 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 



TRADE BALANCE IS 
BETTER »BY OVER A 
HUNDRED MILLION 

JMPROVEMENT in Canada's trade re- 
,, lations with the United States forms 
the subject of anxious concern by states- 
men, financiers, and the business men of 
Canada generally. Good news on the 
matter is found in THE FINANCIAL 
POST of July 6th, which announces an 
improvement of over one hundred million 
dollars in favor of Canj.da as compared 
with the adverse trade balance figures of a 
year ago. 

Yet Further Embargoes Are in Sight. 
Though this is a good indication of the 
ettect of U.S. munition orders placed in 
Canada, and of the results of important 
embargoes devised to right exchange, the 
situation is still sufficiently unfavorable 
to Canada to make further embargoes 
necessary. Important and valuable busi- 
ness warnings are contained in the 
article on this subject on page 1 of THE 
POST this week. 

Footwear Regulation and Rationing. 
Particularly noteworthy are the announce- 
ments made as regards the height and 
colors of women's shoes. Drastic regula- 
tions relating to footwear are apparently 
inevitable. Food ratiloning becomes a 
subject also, of pressing interest with the 
immediate future in view. These subjects 
and others equally important are dis- 
cussed with latest authoritative details in 
THE FINANCIAL POST of July 6th. 
Here are a few headlines indicating the 
business news service rendered by this 
incisively accurate Canadian newspaper for 
business men and investors : 
Conservation of Bank Credit In Canada for 

War Purposes. 
Inter-Imperial Free Trade Policy is Now 

Advocated. 
Canada Develops Trade With the West 

Indies. 
Commissioner Bradshaw Condemns To- 
ronto's Financing of Utilities. 
Start the Children Knitting Their Next 

Winter Hosiery. 
Average Crops Are the Best That Can Now 

be Looked For. 
Southern Alberta Crops Suffer — Pastures 

Are Gone. 
News of Seicurities — Markets Stronger 

After Weak Spell. 
Influences at Work in Wall Street Causing 

Depression. 
Bank Clearings Were 19 P.C. Ahead of 

Last Year. 
When One Bank Can Lend More Money 

Than Another. 
Royal Bank Adds 99 Branches — Closes 

Down 15. 
The Flash and the Frown of David Lloyd 

George. 
Customer Ownership, and Ownership by 

Employees. 
An American View of the Dominion's 

Future — Economic Growth. 
Cost of New Canadian Northern Money 

Will be Up to 8 P.C. 
Ranches Being Changed Into Wheat Fields. 
Government Had Surplus of Funds in 

Month of May. 
While these headlines indicate important 
contents of THE FINANCIAL POST this 
week, they are by no means all THE 
POST'S contents. 

It would take a good deal more space to 
list all the contents of THE POST, but 
of this you can be sure — THE POST is of 
ill Canadian newspapers, perhaps, the one 
best adpted to the alert business man who 
is growing into bigger and more profitable 
business for himself. Send for a trial 
subscription to THE POST to-day, and 
with your reading of the first copy you 
will realize that as a Canadian business- 
man's newspaper THE FINANCIAL POST 
is thoroughly fit and efficient to help on 
your purposeful progress. Use this coupon. 
Pin a dollar bill to it for a 4 months' 
trial subscription. 

The MacLean Publishing Co., 

153 University Ave., Toronto. 
Send me THE FINANCIAL POST each 
week till further ordered. I will send 
subscription price ($3.00 per year, or 
$1.00 for four months' trial subscription) 
on receipt of bill. 

Name 



Address . 



H.&M. 78 



?im 



Never Varies 
in Quality and Toughness 

London Bar Iron is absolutely flawless and 
is uniform throughout, assuring the buyer in- 
trinsic value for his money. 

Our methods of production enable us to produce 
this high-grade Iron at the lowest prices. It will 
pay you to sell it — write us at once. 

London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd. 

LONDON - - CANADA 

Sales Aeents, Ontario, Baines & Peckover. To- 
ronto. Manitoba, Bissett & Loucks, 
Ltd., Winnipeg. 



mi 





There's a good amount of business in your 
town in Babbitt Metals that you could 
capture by stocking Owl Babbitts. 
Owl Traction Babbitt for Tractors 



Owl Babbitt Metal for Thrashers 




BABiBiliTiU 




To be obtained 

from Dealer* in Glass, 

Hardware and Painters' Supplies 

T,..,,: A, RAMStr k SO* eOHPAKY, Hoitltll 

Glaziers * Diamonds 



^ — ----S' -. 




fww\^^ 



Wall Cases, Shelving, DisplayCount- 

ters. Nail Bin Counters, Screw Cases 

All kinds of Store Fittings. 

The quality of our goods is top-notch. PrLc^ ri«ht. 

CAMERON & CAMPBELL 

Sole Manufacturers Toronto, Canada 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out n"w and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



87 



CROWBARS 



We offer you bars made of High Carbon Steel at the same price as 
No. 102-A— CHISEL POINT jou are buying the Mild Steel Bar elsewhere. Send us a trial order. 

B. J. COGHLIN CO., LIMITED, Office and Factory : Ontario St. East, MONTREAL 



TARRED FELT 



SPECIFY 
DOMINION BRAND 



J. H. McCOMB, LIMITED 



Manufacturers of all kinds of 
Building Paper, Pitch and Coal Tar 



MONTREAL 





THE PROGRESSIVE MANUFACTURING CO. 



Torrington, Conn., U.S.A. 



FORSTNER BITS 

bore their way right through tough, hard, knott;, cross-grained wood and le«T« 
a smooth hole end clean surface. That's performanoe. THBY DIFFBR 
FMOM AILL, OTHER BITS, BEING QUITTED BY THE ELM IN8TEAU 
OF THE CENTER. That's scientific construction. They bore any arc of 
a circle and can be guided in any direotion. That's adaptability. 
Made for Brace-^made for machine. Packed sii^gly; packed in seta. Tliat'i 
conTenience. And they sell to Wood Worlrers, Carpenters, Cabinet Makers lod 
others. That's why you Should sell them. Only through your Jobber to-day. 



COLONIAL WIRE MFG. CO., LIMITED 

WORKS : LACHINE CANAL, MONTREAL 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
SMOOTH STEEL WIRES ^"eht, annealea, oiled and annealed 

Tinned Mattress Wire, Broom Wire, Fine Wires — puin and GaWaniied. 
FENCE STAPLES -WIRE NAILS- WOOD SCREWS 
PUMP RODS -Plain and Galvanized. 

SELLING AGENTS: 

CANADIAN TUBE & IRON CO., Limited, MONTREAL 




The Peterboro Lock Mfg. Company, Limited 

Peterboro, Canada 

Established 1885 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

Ship Hardware, Saddlery Hardware, Padlocks, Door Checks, Brass 
and Iron Castings, Stampings and other Hardware Specialties. 



Kindly mention this paper when writing to the advertisers. 



88 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 




Repeat Orders Assured 

For Brantford Binder Twines are a quality product 
through and through, one you can heartily recommend 
to your trade. 

This is no idle statement but plain facts, set forth and 
confirmed by the enormous demand for Brantford Bin- 
der Twines. 

The growth and development of the Company's business 
being unparalleled in the history of the twine and cordage 
industry. 

"There is a reason." A trial order will convince you. 

Rope and Cordage of all kinds. 

BRANTFORD CORDAGE CO., Limited 

BRANTFORD, ONTARIO 

Western Office: 

35 Home Street - Winnipeg, Man. 



A Good Thing Free 

Hardware and Metal has secured another supply of pamphlets, con- 
taining the four Stockdale lectures, for free distribution to the trade. 

Under the following captions one of America's foremost Retail Mer- 
chandising Experts gave in a clear, lucid style the why and where- 
fores of the success and failures in retail stores: 

"Many Businesses Wrecked by Details" 

"How to Make Figure Facts Earn Profits" 

"How to Measure the Value of Turnover" 

"How to Get the Information the Customer Wants" 

We have had these printed for our readers and will gladly supply copies 
free upon request, so long as our supply lasts. Send for your copy now. 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

143-153 University Ave. 
Toronto, Canada 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



89 



The Pump on the Threshing 
Tank should be a 

MYERS 

for in Myers Tank Pump is found 
pumping service of exceptional merit 
inasmuch as Myers Cog Gear Double 
Acting Low Down Tank Pumps operitte 
o8 1/3 % easier, have larger capacity 
and last much longer than the ordin- 
ai7 every day tank pump. 
'Myers Tank Pumps are built for hand 
or power operation, in several 
styles, and are distributed 
by leading jobbers through- 
out Canada. 

It's an easy matter 
for you to get Hhem 
quickly, just as it is 
for you to sell them. 
Circulars and name 
of .Jobber gladly 
supplied. 

F. E. Myers & Bro. 

Ashland. Ohio 




STEP LADDERS 

Two Styles. All Lengths 

Curtain Stretchers 

Tub Stands Ironing Boards 

Clothes Bars 

Quilting Frames, etc. 

Hand Corn Planters 

Drive Well Points 

Post Hole Diggers, etc. 

Aik for Catalogue 

Otterville Manufacturing^ Co. 

OTTER VILLE 



OAKEY'S 

The original and only 

Genuine Preparation 

for cleaning Cutlery 

'WELUNGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

Manufaeturmrs of 

Emery, Bbck Lead, Kmery GIms 
and Flint Cloths wid Papers, etc. 




Wellington Mills, London,S.E.lMEng. 



g't>s»t)c^»t3W.sf^>aaagas''j«f$^<»c;gS5 




If you want easy-fit- 
ting eavetrough and 
conductor pipe, etc., 
order from us. 

WHEELER & BAIN 

TORONTO 



_ Made in Canada 

Lockers 

Factories 
Stores,Offices 
Etc. 



"1 


■■w 




MILBRADT LADDERS 



will pay for themselves in a 
short time by enabling you 
to wait on more trade, save 
the wear and tear on your 
fixtures and goods, as well 
as bring the appearance of 
your store up to date. 

Write to J. H. Ashdown 
Hdwe. Co., Ltd., Winnipeg ; 
Marshall - Wells Co., Ltd.. 
Winnipeg, or direct for cata- 
log giving prices of a large 
number of styles we manu- 
facture, suitable for all 
kinds of shelving. 

John Calander Mfg. Co. 

15S E. 13th Street, 
St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A. 




NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 

& COAL CO., Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



"Delta" Files 

— they'll make 
you many 
friends 




When you pass a 
"Delta" File across 
your counter you 
offer your customer 
the best file service 
he can get anywhere. 
If he knows "Delta" 
he'll warm up to you 
right away. If he 
has never been for- 
tunate enough be- 
fore to meet up 
with a "Delta" 
you'll be introducing 
him to a degree of 
file quality which he 
has thought impos- 
sible of attainment. 
Whether he's an old 
"Delta" user or a 
new one he's going 
to gain a new con- 
ception of the qual- 
ity of your stock and 
of your general busi- 
ness ability. The 
complete satisfaction 
which "Delia" Files 
give him will be 
reflected in his atti- 
tude towards you 
and your entire 
stock. He'll actually 
purchase other goods 
from you on the 
strength of "Delta" 
quality. Do vou know 
our proposition ? 




LTA 



DELTA FILE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

CANADIAN AGENTS: 
H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto; 

Starke, S«ybold, Montreal; 

Wm. Stairs, Son & Morrow, Halifax; 

Merrick-Anderson Co., Winnipeg. 

ALL LEADING JOBBERS. 



90 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 1918 







Firms advertising in this department are particularly interested in supplying require- 
ments of manufacturers, and solicit their inquiries. 




have our sales increased 200% over last 
year ? 



WHY 

nUpAfTCC our prices, quality equal, are 10 i 
D£iV/r\Ul3Ej lov^rer than others 

OUR GRADES 

Colored— IB, lA, 7, 1, 5 
White-Jap, XC, X, XX, XXX 

ACME WASTE MFG. CO. 

LIMITED 
482 WELLINGTON ST. W., TORONTO 

5 Queen Street, Montreal 1206 McArthnr Bldg., Winnipeg 



C. KLOEPFER, LIMITED 

Edward Halloran, General Manager 

44-50 Wellington Street East, TORONTO 
And at Guelph 

IRON and STEEL 

HEAVY HARDWARE 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 




PATENTED 

This is the trade mark to look for in buying your 
Box Strapping, Corrugated Fasteners, Steel Mats, 
Running Board Mats, Bed Fasteners, Pail Clasps, 
Hoop Iron. 
Our complete catalogue will be sent on request. 

Acme Steel Goods Co. of Canada, Ltd. 

MONTREAL 



Agents : 
Frederick Sara & Co. 
H. C. Brennan Co. 



Calgary, Alta. 
Ottawa. Ont. 




P.tentedjune 12. 1906 



F.BRAIS&CO. 

Manufacturers of 

The Improved 



Gem Scriber 



Useful to all mechanics — carpentere especially. Takes the place of the com- 
pass, and being very small (ciit is two^hirds of adtual size) it can be car- 
ried in the vest or overall pocket vrithout danger as the points are blunt. 
Ask your "Hardware Dealer" for it. If he does not carry them in stock 
insist thalt he get it for you. Look for the brand of F. Brais & Co. 
Those using the "Gem Scriiber" claim it to be one of the handiest tools on 
the market. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

F. BRAIS & COMPANY 

4139 EA i 90th STREET CLEVELAND, OHIO 



TORONTO HAMILTON Winnipeg 

IRON AND STEEL 

HEAVY HARDWARE 

MILL SUPPLIES 
AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 

WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and j- 




July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND M K T A T. 



91 



Look for the full name 

Russell Jennings 

stamped on the round of our 

Auger Bits 

The original double twist auger bit, patented by 
Mr. Russell Jennings in 1855 

Russell Jennings Mfg. Co. 

CHESTER, CONN., U.S.A. 




INCREASE 

Your Selling 
Capacity 




Onr Canier Semce will increase your selling capacity without a Idins 
to the number of your salesmen. The statement is concisely, though 
tully e.vplained in our four-page leaflet. By its analysis tlie matter 
IS at once seen— as it really is-i:o be practical and so simple that 
It IS often overlooked, chiefly through the long and studied arguments 
ot these who are interested in introducing more costlv machinery and 
complicated methods. The leaflet for the asking. Write for it to-day. 
Level, grade and peniendicular wire cash carriers, parcel carriers 
cable carriers and pneumatic tubes. 

GIPE-HAZARD STORE SERVICE CO., LTD., 
113 Sumach St., Toronto, Can. 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. '^'"'^'^'' 



Avoid imitations of our 



CUTLERY ^^''Vl^ J^^^-fr 



By seeing that this exact 
mark is on each blade 



SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton ^ Company 

MONTREAL 



llllllnuilllllll 




Put up in the way that best 
appeals *» **>« , 

people -that's Drantrord 

It's an all 'round slue and makes Kood profits ^^ w w w ^>« 

for dealers. I I 11 H 

In M. % and 1 lb. packages at your jobbers. \J I .j ^^ ^^ 

CANADA GLUE CO., Limited, Brantford, Ont. 



Mr. Manufacturer, We Get 
Results in the West 



This organization includes a bunch of live 
salesmen who are calling regularly on 
both the wholesale and retail trade 
throughout Western Canada. We are get- 
ting good business for our clients because 
we know our field thoroughly and cover 
it often. If yours is a good line we cer- 
tainly can get business for you. Get in 
touch with us. 



Geo. W. Griffiths & Co., Ltd. 

Winnipeg 




Big^ Spring and Summer Seller 

Every housekeeper — city or 
country— a likely purchaser of 

''Comfort" 
Iron 

Makes its own gas, twu- 
pointed, self - heating, self- 
cleaning. Operates easily at 
low cost. Looks gooi and 
Bakes good, guaranteed. Sells 
fast. 

Ask yoiur jobber for par- 
ticular or write direct. 

Dept. 16. 




National Stamping and 

410-424 S. Clinton St. 



Electric Works 

Chicago, 111. 





Our large stock of Carriage and Machine 
Bolts and Coach Screws, Rivets, ITuts and 
Washers, assures quickly filled orders and 
pronopt shipment. Our quality and price 
please everybody. 

LONDON BOLT & HINGE WORKS 
LONDON, CANADA 



lli 






An Inexpensive 
Chevrolet Lock 
that sells 



Dealers, sell this Chevrolet Lock 
— easy and simple to operate. 
Car owners can carry it in vest 
pocket. 

Manufactured by 

HOMER & WILSON 

1-3-S Lancaster Street 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



92 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 191S 




|i!l!!!:i;illi!l!;!lll/in!!riWWlffil!lll!!l!MIII!m||iP!W!ffl\i 




Any trade-mark slionn on this f>age, when stamped on 
an article of hardware, is tfie manufacturer s personal 
"O.K .," suaranteems the quality of the product. 



iffi!BI)ii(l!!i!r»KI» 




BRASS CHECKS I BATH ROOM FITTINGS 



Drop a card for prices and particular*. 

HAMILTON STAMP & STENCIL WORKS. LTD. 
HAMILTON. ONT. 



WASHERS 

Round Iron Washers, all 
even thickness and 
Ibmooth, aJli sizes in 
stock, any quantity 
from 100 lbs. up. Packed 
in jute bags. Prompt 
shipment. Send your in- 
quiries to 
DesRochers Limited 
268 Centre St.. Montreal 





FOOD CHOPPERS 

Knires and plates made from 
wrought Swedish steel of finest 
quality. These choppers may be 
had tinned all over or enamelled 
white inside and japanned red 
outside. Stock carried. 

F. W. LAMPLOUGH A CO. 
Unity Bide. Mentrcal 



PATENT 

IDEAS 




Get lUt wa 

our"Relercn< 

I sketch lor tree report a: 



Harold C. Shipman & Co., Patent Attys. 

Ccotrm) Chamben. OtUwa, CuiacIa 



TbePARMEsNTER BULLOCH CO., Ltd 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burn, 
Bifurcated and Tvrt>ular Rivets, Wire Nails, 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails, Escut- 
cheon Pins, Leather Shoe and Overshoe Buckle*, 

Felloe Plates. 




STOVE & ELECTRICAL 

MICA 

Stove mica in assorted 
sizes for the trade 

A. G. MARTIN 

234-236 Besserer St. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 



CuiMj^yiiMfmf 




r^, KINZINGER, BRUCE 
KA & CO., LIMITED 



^NIAGARAv NIAGARA FALI^ CAN\DA 



AUTO ACCESSORIES 



THE CLIPPER 

There are three thliit> 
thtt destroy yoiu' lawn . 
Dandelions. Buck Plan 
tain and Crab Grass. In 
one season the Clipper 
will drive them all out. 
All dealers should in- 
vestigate selling powi- 
bUiltie.'. Drop us a line 
and we wUI send cir- 
cular and prices. 

CLIPPER LAWN MOWER CO. Dixon, III. 





.Send for our circulars 
and post up on 
stronger joints. 



BISSETT & WEBB 

Limited 

126 Lombard Street 

Winnipeg, Canada 





Emerald & Burton 



^rTd lAMPBlACKS 

f/?jf ^cfs d/^ d//s//7ess 
..V^^t^^.^ WILCKES. MARTIN WILCKESCO 



Poultry Leg Bandsft 
"Ear lags and Buttons! 

^ FOR STOCK Retail PrictS 

Challenge adjustable Leg Bands 15c per doz. 85c per 100 
Single spiral colored bands , _ 20c per doz. 90c per 100 

Three spiral colored bands 25c per doz. $1.25 per 100 

Cattle Ear Tags and Buttons, prices according to a mount 
of printing required. Catalogue FVee 



iiffi ^RiDEAU Specialty Co. 

IIIIH.E.ROSSI l"««»"cn;«ERS" SMITHS FALLS 01 




STERLING 
Hack Saw Blades and Machineis 

Manufactured by 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works 

BUFFALO. N.Y. 




Cannon Oilers 

Easy Seller Because — 

It is exceptionally convenient, quick-adtdng and 
all oil saver. Just what meets a long-felt, de- 
mand for an oil can in which oil is entirely 
controlled by the operator in whatever position 
the can may be held. Ndti a drop of oil need 
t)e wasted, as the flow of oil stops the instant 
the pressure on the plunger stops. 
Ask any Tlireshennan, Mechanic or user. 
^. sure good sale and splendid profit. 



THE 

CANNON 

OILER" 




FORCES 

THE OIL 
ANYWHERE 

Name Copyrighted. 
Original Patents Owned. 
All Rights Reserved. 

Order NOW of Your Jobber. 

Manufactured only by 

THE CANNON OILER COMPANY 

Successor to R. E. Bloomer 

Keithsburg, Illinois, U.S.A. 



Your Ad In This Paper 

will get the attention of the busy 
men. They find here what they 
want, and they use it as a catalogue 
when they are in need. Will they 
see your ad? 



KINDLY MENTION THIS 

PAPER WHEN WRITING 

ADVERTISERS 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 









IB 



m 












B 



m 






Polarine Makes A Good Car Better 

Polarine Makes Good Business Better 



Helps you make sales. 

All Canadian motorists know our slogan, 
"Polarine Makes a Good Car Better." It 
is prominently displayed in advertise- 
ments now running in the leading news- 
papers, farm papers and motor maga- 
zines in Canada. Use our slogan and tie 
your business up closely to the wonder- 
ful selling force of our advertising. 



So absolutely true. 

Motorists remember our slogan because 
it is so true, Polarine does make a good 
car better. It makes a poor car better, 
too. Every car properly lubricated with 
Polarine will give more efficient, econo- 
mical and satisfactory service. That is 
why Polarine is used in more motor cars 
in Canada to-day than any other oil. 



rine 



FRICTION REDUCING MOTOR OIL 



Makes a ijood car better 



Increases profits every way. 

There are more than 200,000 automo- 
biles in Canada, most of these use Polar- 
ine Lubricants. When you handle Po- 
larine you bring these worth-while cus- 
tomers into your store, and they will 
buy many other things besides Polar- 
ine. There is 33 1-3 per cent, of profit, 
or more in every Polarine sale. 
Polarine gives satisfaction. Motorists 
like an oil that "Makes a good car bet- 
ter." Sell Polarine and you will in- 
crease the number of your customers 
that come back. Polarine increases pro- 
fits every way. 



Not a sale lost. 

There is a proper Polarine Lubricant 
for every type of motor — for every bear- 
ing — for every moving part. 
Polarine is made in two grades, Polar- 
ine and Polarine Heavy. There is also 
Polarine Transmission Oil and Polarine 
Transmission and Cup Grease. Polarine 
Motor Oils are sold in attractively sealed 
cans — gallons, four gallons, and a 
special half-gallon for Ford cars. Also 
sold in 121/2 gallon steel kegs, barrels 
and half -barrels. 



If you sell Polarine remember our slogan, "Polarine Makes a 
Good Car Better." If you are not selling Polarine now, ask for 
our very attractive proposition to Hardware Dealers. Send for 
our new Polarine booklet on Automobile Lubrication. 



I MPERI AL CML I4JM ll^D 

ilanufacturers & MarRetcrs bf PblABINE MOTOR 6115^^ 6^ 

Isit TRANCHE 









94 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

i « ^ » ^ 



July 13, 1918 



m 



m 
m 



m 




Stop Profit Losses 
In Handling Motor Oils 

To stop profit leaks from waste and the inconvenient handling of motor 
oils, mstall their Gilbert & Barker T-230 battery outfit. 

Many hardware dealers are building up a lucrative motor oil trade 
A rS"o?.n ^"L5^®.^* increase in automobile and motor truck operators. 
A l-^dO outfit, single or m battery form, will equip any dealer to handle 
such business profitably and conveniently. 

Put an end to leaks and the seepage into barrel walls attendant upon 
barrel storage. Substitute convenient and exact measurements— quarts 
or lesser quantities— for messy, wasteful handling and increase your 
profits and your trade. No fire risk with this economizing system. 

Write for our catalogue of gasoline 
and oil storage equipment. Full in- 
formation can be secured from Im- 
perial Oil Limited. 




1 M PERIAL OIL LIT^ITISD 

Canadian DisMbatoi^ x>f Q\\hQrt ^ ^i^ir^R^ JGas(^ine^n<L 
^^ Z Outfits- 

BRANCHES IN ALL axiES 



i ^P ^P ^P W3 W3 WM' W 






July 13, 1918 HARDWARP: and metal — Motor Accessories. Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. 95 



A FAR-REACHING 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

Wire Wheel Corporation of America 

Appoints 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co,,Limited 

Exclusive Distributors for 

Canada 

In order that purchasers of the Famous "Houk" and "House" Pa- 
tented Wire Wheels in Canada may receive the quickest possible de- 
liveries — and have utmost satisfaction in the transaction — we have deem- 
ed it advisable to have direct representation in Canada. Therefore, we 
have appointed the Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Limited, our ex- 
clusive distributors for Canada. In this way, we will be utilizing the 
great organization of the Dunlop Rubber Company, and our many 
friends in Canada will enjoy the benefits accruing from the systematiz- 
ed service being given by the Dunlop Company's fourteen full-fledged 
branches at Victoria, Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Saskatoon, Re- 
^na, Winnipeg, I:^ondon, Hamilton, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, St. 
John, Halifax. 

All future requisitions of the trade — whether for complete sets of 
Wire Wheels in either "Houk" or "House" type, or for repair parts — 
should be forwarded direct to the Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., 
Limited, Toronto, or to any of their branches, as listed above. 

We appreciate the measure of patronage extended to us in the past, 
and now that the delivery service inCanada willbeasgoodasthe Wire 
Wheels themselves — which means Best Possible — we feel safe in pre- 
dicting that the era of widespread use of "Houk" and "House" Wire 
Wheels from Halifax to Victoria has arrived. 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., Limited, will, also, control the 
distribution of "Houk" and "House" Wire Wheels in Newfoundland. 

WIRE WHEEL CORPORATION OF AMERICA 

New York City 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



96 



HARDWARE AND METAL—iMotor Accessories, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. July 13, 1918 



A RF MINHF P TH AT ^® *^^ »" * position to supply you with these 

i-L lYl^iVIll^l^l^IV I r^lM i seasonable automobile Accessories-always in 

great demand at this time of the year. A generous display of these articles in the window and 
about your store, will bring many new customers. Get busy right NOW! 

Hyslop Refrigerator Grip Hyslop Outside Tire Boot or Hyslop Inside Blowout Patch 

(With Double Flap) 




Hyslop Outside Tire Boot or 
Blowout Patch 



SECTIONAL CUT SHOWING ICE AND FOOD 
CONTAINERS 

This portable refrigerator is a most valuable 
outfit for fishing, hunting or automobile trips. 

For the automobile tour or camping trip the 
HYSLOP REFRIGERATOR GRIP is the most 
complete and satisfactory equipment ever made. 
The lunches are kept fresh, the bottles cold, in 
the food compartment. 

No Fisherman's Outfit is Com- 
H plete Without a Hyslop 
Refrigerator Grip 




No. 7872 

With the HYSLOP REFRIGERATOR GRIP 
you can carry your lunch and refreshments on 
your fishing trip, and upon your return bring 
the trout or bass packed in ice. and they are 
kept as firm and fresh as when taken from the 
stream, retaining all their wonderful flavor. 

The HYSLOP REFRIGERATOR GRIP is good 
for any company — carry it with you in your 
automobile, the parlor car — anywhere that you 
go. The principle and construction of this grip 
is such that the water cannot come in contact 
with the contents of the food container and it 
positively cannot drip. 

No. 7872 — Price, 20-in. Hyslop Refrig- 
"V erator Grip with galvanized metal con- 
tainers $20.00 




No. 7055 
Hooks fasten to rim, the clasp encircling the 
casing and binding together the torn sections 
caused by the blowout. 

No. Tire Size Style of Rim. Price 

7055 31/2 in. Clincher $0.55 




Nos. 7030-32 

Made of best grade cured rubber and fabric. 
This boot is of ample length and strength to take 
care of any tire trouble resulting from blowouts, 
punctures or stone bruises affecting the outside 
tread. It should always be used in conjunction 
with Hyslop Inside Blowout Patches in case of 
a blowout. 

Laces securely to wheel and under the rim by 
strong rawhide thongs. 

No. 7030— Price, for 3-in. tire ..$1.00 

No. 7031 — Price, for 3%-in. and 4-in. tire.. 1.25 
No. 7032~Price, for 4y2-in. and 5-in. tire.. 1.50 

Friction Insulated Tape 




No. 7083 

A very heavy close-woven friction tape, adhes- 
ive on both sides. 

Very useful to bind up a cut in a tire, and 
should be used for this purpose with a Hysiop 
Outside Tire Boot. 

Being insulated, it is the ideal tape for bind- 
ing together ignition or lighting cable. 

Many motorists also wind this friction tape 
around the w^ooden section of steering wheel where 
the hands come in contact with same, in order to 
secure a good and comfortable grip. 
No. 7083— Price, 14-lb. roll $0.20 

Cementless Tube Patches 




No. 7067 

These patches are prepared ready for use with- 
out cement, acid or vulcanizing ; just remove 
muslin cover, moisten with gasoline and place on 
tube. 

Each box consists of one dozen assorted patches 
of the proper sizes. 
No. 7067— Price $0.35 

Order by Catalogue Number. 




Nos. 703.5-3 

This protector is applied inside of casing to 
make a temporary repair in case of a blow-ouc, to 
strengthen a weak spot broken fabric, puncture, 
etc. 

No. 7035— Price, for 3 in. tire $0.55 

No. 7036— Price, for SVa-in. and 4-in tires. .55 
No. 7037 — Price, for 4y2-in. and 5-in. tires. .65 

Hyslop Tire Cut Healer 

Neglected cuts in 
casings allow watei- 
and dampness to pene- 
trate to the inner con- 
struction of the tire, 
and unless attended to 
promptly will rot the 
fabric and cause blow- 
outs. 

At the first appear- 
ance of the cut, use 
Tire Cut Filler, which 
is a very heavy com- 
pound that fills cuts 
and holes in auto- 
Tndbile tires, thereby 
preventing decay 
solidifies quickly and 
becomes a part of the 
tire. 

To apply, insert the 
long tapering nozzle 
into the cut, compress 
the tube, work in the 
rubber substance, and 
the repair is completed. 

Tire Cut Filler welds 
itself to the walls of 
the cut, making a 
union so perfect no 
road abuse can remove 
it. Timely application 
will reduce tire ex- 
pense fully 30 per 
No. 7078 cent. 
Put up in Collapsible metal tubes, 6 inches long. 
No. 7078— Price, 6x1 in. tube $0.35 




HEALS 
THE CUTS 





Tire Paint ^ 



^^—„„^^^^ This paint not only 

Mp^r^^^^^KS nml makes used tires look 

"' ' ^K^KSMfA 1^ jj)^g new, but protects 

them from the action 
of sunlight, dampness 
or other rubber- 
destroying ele- 
ments. 

Tire Paint is a 
compound of pure 
rubber in liquid 
form. Upon ap- 
plication to the 
tire, it flows into 
the small cuts 
and crevices and 
waterproofs the 
exposed outer 
fabric. 

Tire Paint 
should be used in 
conjunction with 
Tire Cut Filler, 
which repairs the 
more severe rents 
A n apparently- 
Insignificant cut, 
ij^nored, invariabl 
y results in prema 
No. 7028 ture tire decay. 
Tire Paint helps to make the entire car look 
"resh, clean and new. 
No. 7028— Price, 20-oz. tin $0.7» 



HYSLOP BROTHERS LIMITED 



Shuter and Victoria Streets 
Toronto, Ontario 



July 13, 1918 JIAKDWAKK AND m^lTXL— Motor AccesU.WWW AUE AND METAL— Motor Acces 



97 



Wiw^m Should Be A 
Michelin Dealer 



Michelin Does Not Tie Up Your 

Capital in Many Different 

Grades or Types of Tires 

Instead of offering several types of non-skids, 
several different plain treads, and several grades 
of tubes — Michelin offers just one quality of each 
of these — The Best. 

Consequently, it requires a smaller investment to 
carry an adequate stock of Michelin Tires than to 
carry a less adequate line of most other makes. 

This saving leaves the Michelin Dealer free to 
extend his business in other departments — and is 
another reason why Michelin Dealers are suc- 
cessful. 

Write to-day for Michelin's Dealer 
Proposition. 

Michelin Tire Co. of^Canada, Ltd. 

782 St. Catherine Street West - Montreal 




98 



HARDWARE AND METAL— Mo^or Accessories, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. July 13, 1913 



Fairbanks-Morse 
Automobile 
Accessories 



Inland Piston Rings 

Bethlehem Spark Plugs 

Wolf's Head Oil 

Thermoid Brake Lining 

PuU-U-Oute 

Fyr Fyter Fire Extinguisher 

Bumpers 

Lighting Systems 

Eveready Batteries 

Conophores 

Sparton Horns 

Tire Doh 

Norwesco Products 

Van Speedmeters 



A recent Order-in-Council 
of the Dominion Government 
restricts the importation o f 
Automobiles. 

This means that every old 
car in the Dominion is going to 
be hauled out and put into 
commission. 

Fairbanks - Morse Automo- 
bile Accessories will put a car 
on the most efficient operating 
basis. They are priced to per- 
mit a good dealer's profit. 



We advise that you anticipate similar Govern- 
mental restrictions on Accessories by placing 
your orders immediately. 




The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 

"Canada's Departmental House for Mechanical Goods" 

St. John Quebec Montreal Ottawa Toronto Hamilton Windsor 

Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary Vancouver Victoria 



// avy advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 HARDWARE AND METAL 



-Motoy Accessories, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. 



99 



'^ N\ 



'^yf\TX 





Send for this 

valuable 

brake lining 

chart 

HERE is a chart that will 
be a convenience to every 
dealer who sells brake 
lining. It shows you instantly 
the sizes and amount of brake 
lining and clutch facings need- 
ed on any car. It also lists the 
type of brakes on each. It 
covers all the standard cars 
and motor trucks and all the 
models of each car for three 
years. 

It will prove useful to you, and 
will also interest your custom- 
ers, especially the table which 
shows how quickly a car should 
stop with brakes applied when 
going at various speeds. 
If you sell brake lining fill out 
the coupon now. The chart is 
free to dealers and jobbers. 



Thermoid Rubber Company 

Factory and Main Offices: Trenton. N.J. 

Branches:! t^^B 

New York Chicago San Francisco 

Indianapolis Detroit Los Ang-eles 

Philadelphia Pittsburgh Boston London 

Turin Paris 

Canadian Distributors: 

The Canadian Fairoanks-Morse Company. 
Limited. Montreal ^ HM , 

Branches in all principal Canadian cities. 



SIZE CHART 

^^^J^^J^Truck Bmke Lbing and Clutd^Fadng. 




Thermoid Rubber Co. 

Trenton, N. J. 

Dept. 9. 

Name 

Street 

City 



State 



Actual size 24x36 in. 



Please send me your free chart showing sizes of 
brake linings for passenger cars and motor trucks 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answer 



ed. 



100 HARDWARE AND METAL— Mo^or Acceswrie.^^, Bkijdes and Sporting Goods Section. July 13, 1918 





Anywhere 
Quickly! 

Worm Drive Trucks 



We have the solution of YOUR delivery problem in LITTLE GIANT 

Models for all business. One, two, three and a half and five tons 

One- Year Guarantee backed by a Corporation with resources of $1 4,000,000 

Little Giant Trucks are equipped with Duntley Gas Generator, permitting the use of 
Kerosene, Distillate or other low grade mixtures at a saving in fuel costs of full 50 . 

Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Limited 



For Territorial Agencies, write 

Montreal Office 



345 CRAIG STREET WEST 
MONTREAL 



BRANCH; 

107 Church St., Toronto 



.INNER BEARING CUP 

pUTER BEARING CUP 
INNER BEARING^-~-~^UT."' BEARING 
CONE AND ROLLeS§=^ONE& ROLLERS 




LOCK NUT 
LOCK WASHER 



Trojan 
Roller Bearings 

for 

Ford and Chevrolet 
Cars 



Trojan Roller Bearings were designed to provide high grade and easy-running bearings for the front wheels of 
the Ford and Chevrolet 490 cars. They eliminate all the trouble in steering as they hold the wheels rigidly in line 
and parallel. 

They Save Wear and Tear on the Tires 

Made of high grade material, they will sustain a load many times greater than the old bearings. 
No machine work necessary. Changed in 30 minutes. No fear of breakdown. 

GREAT WEST ELECTRIC CO., LIMITED 

WINNIPEG 
Distributors of Laco Tungsten and Nitro Lamps 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 HARDWARE AND METAL— Mo^or Accessories, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. 



101 



Driving without a KLAXON 
is like driving at night without 
any lights, or on a slimy pave- 
ment without chains, or down 
hill without dependable 
brakes. Why take chances? 



The three KLAXONS 
illustrated are electric 
motor driven. They 
are sturdy, staunch, 
depend able and 
trouble - proof --- the 
famous Klaxon quality 
throughout. They 
operate in connection 
with any electric self- 
starting system, or on 
storage batteries, or 
dry cells. 




KLAXON 20-L $32.50 




KLAXON 12-L $18.50 




KLAXON 6 $9.25 



CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 

LIMITED 

Head Office: Toronto. Sales Offices: Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Sydney, Ottawa, Cobalt, South Porcupine, 
London, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, Nelson and Vancouver. 



// atiy advertisement interests you, tear it out noiv and place with letters to be answered. 



102 



HARDWARE AND METAL — Motor Accessories, Bicycles and Sporting 'Goods Section. July 13, 191! 




Price in the 

Dominion of 

Canada: $12 

east of Cal- 
gary, $12.50 
Calgary and 
West. 



It's easy to sell 

if you show how it works 

T^EEP a Johns-Manville Extinguisher handy 
to show to the prospective buyer while 
you explain its fast operation and unwavering 
aim. Show how the controlling lever lets you 
pump pressure as you pump to the blaze and 
thus gives you the chance for instant action. 
Explain the value of a straight, steady stream 
of quenching liquid on the fire from the second 
you throw the lever open; and how this hastily- 
stored air pressure supplies this. 

Make these facts plain as you go— and you'll 
find it's easy to sell the Johns-Manville Fire 
Extinguisher. 

Johns-Manville Fire Extinguishers, and all other Johns- 
Manville accessories, are sold strictly on a jobber-dealer 
basis. Discounts are generous and uniform, regardless 
of the size of your order. Ask our nearest branch or your 
own jobber. 

The Canadian 
H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE COMPANY, LIMITED 

Montreal Toronto Vancouver Winnipeg 

Hamilton London Ottawa 



OHNS- 
ANVILLE 

[SERVICE 



COVERS 

TOE CONTINENT* "*"*« 



Johns.. 
Manville 

FIRE EXTINGUISHER 



The New 



0^AeW Dody Brace 

am) Running Board Support/^Ibrds 



The Presto Brace — strong as a bull 
because built scientifically like a 
trussed steel structure — read these ten 
important reasons why it is a real 
necessity for Ford cars: 
Stops vibration. 

Avoids sagging of running boards and 
Prevents their breaking away from 

fenders. 
Prevents broken springs. 
Prevents side swaying. 
Prevents uneven strain. 
Holds drive shaft in position. 
Holds all mechanical parts in align- 
ment. 
Equalizes spring action. 
Easily installed; no holes to drill; no 
mechanic necessary. 
Once used, it is practically indispens- 
able because it enables you to carry 
800 pounds on either running board if 
necessary without injury to your car. 
Dealers are amazed at the unprece- 
dented success with which the Presto 
Brace is meeting. 

Price in Canada, $6.00. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Order from your jobber, 
or write to us if he cannot supply you. 
Dealers — Here's a new one that's get- 
ting over big. Write and ask us about 
it. Satisfactory discounts. Write for 
literature and cuts of all new products. 
Presto products mean bigger profits 
through increased sales. 



'\J 



METAL SPECIALTIES MT(3r. COl 
IS36-352 N.KcdricAv<?. (2hk< 

Saatsm Branch ~ IS-S4 West fibt St Nw Yorfe,Cify«.| 
Western 3i3nch- 149 New Monl9omGrySt San Francisco/ 



July 13, 1918 HARDWARE AND METAI^ — Motor Accessorie.% BIcjjcles and Sporting Goods Section. 



103 



Satisfied Customers 
Increase Profits 




tie- 10^ B„wse. Lalteiy 

Accurate measure, clean stores, and 
good quality of products all tend to please 
customers. Pleased customers cause re- 
peat orders and new business. 

Bowser Systems for storing and distri- 
buting oils and varnishes are the cleanest, 
most economical, and most satisfactory 
equipment on the market. Eliminate fire 
hazard. 

Write for Booklet 

S. F. Bowser & Co., Inc., Toronto, Can. 



IF YOU ARE HIT 

By the recent Government Regula- 
tions prohibiting importation of various 
lines of Sporting Goods, why not make 
up the loss by paying greater attention 
to the important and profitable business 
of selling bicycles and bicycle acces- 
sories. 

Of course you will want a line which 
will be easy to sell and will give abso- 
lute satisfaction to your customers. In 
other words, 

C.C.M. BICYCLES 

in any of the following well-known 
name-plates: 

RED BIRD CLEVELAND 

MASSEY PERFECT 

GENDRON, COLUMBIA or 
IVANHOE 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co. Ltd. 

Montreal, Toronto, WESTON, Winnipeg, Vancouver 



Dress up your ca^ 
with 



Diamonds 
Win! 



SQUEEGEE T|V~!/%^ 
TREAD lire* 



All over the United States and Canada DIAM OND TIRES are winning a reputation for cut- 
ting deep into tire upkeep costs. 

For after all what does purchase price amount to if the tires do not cost less to run? 

In buying DIAMOND TIRES your customer begins to cut tire upkeep from the first minute 
and keeps on cutting the upkeep the more he runs them. 

You'll save time in closing DIAMOND sales by just impressing your prospect with this fact: 
When he equips his car with four DIAMONDS he is cutting tire upkeep four ways at once. 
Order from 

North American Hardware Supply, Limited 

Wholesale Hardw^are, Diamond Tires and Accessories 
222 NOTRE DAME ST. WEST :-: MONTREAL 



// ayiy advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place ivith letters to be answered. 



104 



HARDWARE AND METAL — 3Iotor Accesmries, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. July 13, 1&18 




Firearms 

"THE 
PROVEN BEST 
BY GOVERN' 
MENT TEST." 



On the battlefield, in the preservation of law and 
order, the protection of home and country — whenever 
and wherever armies or individuals have had to en- 
force right with might — COLT'S FIREARMS have 
been creating, building and maintaining a reputation 
for merit, efficiency and reliability that has resulted in 
a position of unquestioned superiority. 

Colt's Patent Fire Arms Mfg.Co.,Hartford, Conn.,U.S.A. or A. MacFarlane & Co.,Coristine Bldg., Montreal 



I 



Note 

where we get 

the support 




and how 
strongly 
we hold 



Every Man who Drives a Ford Knows — 

He can save the differential gears of his car by installing a set of our Patent 
Truss Rods, now acknowledged to be the very best truss rods made. 

For old type housing we provide special clamps. 

Dealers when ordering state whether your customer uses shock absorbers and 
what make. 

Sole Manufacturers 

CHRISTIANSEN IMPLEMENTS LTD. 

WINNIPEG - MANITOBA 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 13, 1918 HARDWARE AND METAL — Motor Accesitones, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. 

THE RESPONSE 

IS QUICK .^M^Hi j:,rf^ =^^^^- 

AND STRONG 



105 



'•#S 



J mm. 



mm. 






»Ada Dry CeU* 

Limited 




You have the right to look to the manufacturer for satisfaction^ 
And your customer has a right to look to you. When you stock' 
and sell NORTH STAR BATTERIES you have done much in 
guaranteeing your own interests and your customer's. 
The name "North Star" helps make the sale. 
Especially adapted for the most powerful ignition work on 
automobiles, motor boats and gas engines; also splendid for 
lighting Hand Lanterns, etc. Scientifically made of the best 
materials, under expert supervision, carefully inspected and 
tested. 

The Western Battery for the Western Need 

Also made in Waterproof Multiples for Convenience 



"iii^ki ijiii^iyj iiMiiti''»^-wwyiww<^wiwwwwi»iity'wpgffBii 



ifimmi^mmi'mmmmm'mm 



j* .^w w »w i wi i « ii ilMiJuui"wi w wmyw i i| I - 



"XANADA. DitV ClLI-S, LiltllTED. WlNNIPEOjOuMAaA. 




FORD SET 

The Ford Set contains: 1 Handle 7 
inches in length; 2 Screw-driver Bits; 
1 Extension Bar 6 inches in length; 
SIX SOCKETS to fit all nuts and bolt 
heads on Ford Car, including the 
cylinder head. 




STANDARD SET 

Standard Set contains: 1 Handle 7 
"inches in length; 2 Screw-driver Bits; 
7 Sockets to fit semi-finished .Hex nuts, 
as follows: U.S. Standards from % to 
% in.; A.L.A.M. Standards from 5-16 
to 11-16 in.; Cap Screw Heads from 
5-16 in. to % in. 



Autoists like that ratchet feature 

Lane's Unique Ratchet Wrench 
is ideal for close work 

The autoist who has once discovered a few of the hard-to-get-at nuts 
and screws on his car is only too pleased to have some one introduce to 
him Lane's Unique Ratchet Wrench. He sees at a glance how effective 
the ratchet feature would be in close quarters where an ordinary tool 
would be absolutely useless. 

Play up this ratchet feature and so arrange auto accessory displays that 
when motorists get up against the tool problem they will remember 
Lane's Unique Ratchet Wrench and come to you for a set. 



Representatives 



BRITISH COI/UMBIA 
MUIen & Son, Irtd. ... - Vancouver 
Wood-Vallanoe & Legatt - - - Vancouver 

AUBERTA 
Mar^all-Wells Alberta Co. - - Edmonton 
Wood-Vallance & Adams - - - - Calgary 
Merchants Hdwe. Specialties - - Calgary 

The Chapin Company ... - Calgary 
Motor Car Supply Co., Ltd. - - - Calgary 
Great West Saddlery Co. - - - Edmonton 
Great West Saddlery Co. ... Calgary 

SASKATCHEWAN 
J. H. Ashdown Hdwe. Co. - - Saskatoon 
Bowman Brothers .... Saskatoon 

Western iMoltor Supply, Ltd. - - - Begina 
W. W. Cooper Co. ... Swift Current 

Great West Saddlery Co. - - - - Kegina 
Great W«st Saddlery Co. ... Saskatoon 

MAINrrOBA 
J. H. Ashdown Hdwe. Co., Ltd. - Winnipeg 
Marshall-Wells Hdwe Co., Ltd. - Winnipeg 

Wood-Vallance & Co. .... Winnipeg 
Great Weat Saddlery Co. - - - Winnipeg 
Merrick^Anderson Co., Ltd. - - Winnipeg 



Miller-IMorse Hdwe. Co,, Ltd. 
Michael H>t, Ltd. 

ONTARIO 
HoMis Hardware Co. 
D. H. Howden & Co., Ltd. 
London Engine Supply Co. 
Wood-Vallance & Co. 
Alexander Hardware Co. 
H. S. Howland. Sons Co., Lt 
Kennedy Hdwe. Co., 
Aikenhead Hdwe., Ltd. 
Bice Lewis & Son, Ltd. 
Millen & Son, Ltd. 
A. Chown & Co. 
Edwin Chown & Son 
W. B. Dalton & Sons, Ltd. 
Thomas Birkett & Sons Oo, 

QUEBEIC 
Cav«rhill, Learmon'ti & Cto. - 
Lewis Brothers, Ltd. 
MiUen & Son, Ltd. 
Mechanics Supply Co. 
J. H. Mitchedl & Co. 
L« Oie Codire & Fils 



- Winnipeg 

- Winnipeg 

- London 
. London 

- London 

- Hamilton 
. Hamil'ton 

Toronto 

- Toronto 

- Toronto 

- Toronto 

- Toronto 

- Kingston 

- Kingston 

- Kingston 

- Ottawa 

- Montreal 

- Montreal 

- Montreal 

- Quebec 
^Sherbrooke 

Sherbrooke 



Will B. Lane ■ Chicago, 111. 

180 North Dearborn Street 



106 



HARDWARE AND METAL— Motor Accessories, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. July 13, I9i8 



The "NIAGARA" 

Rear Tire Carrier for FORD Cars 




Quickly Attached, without drilling any holes. 
Three Arm Support ensures rigidity. 
No Chafing of Tires in Pressed Steel Basket. 
Carries Demountable rim or plain tire. 
Lock Furnished for safety. 
Brilliant Finish in Baked Black Enamel. 
Ample Clearance over the roughest roads. 
Price $6,00. Write for particulars. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Kinzinger Bruce & Co., Ltd. 

Niagara Falls Canada 






MADE IN CANADA 




OILS 



These are a few of our most staple lines, so well and favorably 
known throughout Western Canada, and are sold only throngh 
reliable merchants. 




Big Opportunity To Sell To Owners of 

Small Cars 

SUB-RADIUS ROD,— A boon to small car owners. 
Prevents rods from breaking or bending and eliminates 
chance of accidents. Stops vibration. Simple, depend- 
able, durable. 

Rear Axle Truss. — Prevents rear axle housing from 
sagging or being thrown out of line. No extra fittings, 
no holes to drill, all ready to easily adjust. 

These accessories are money makers. Write direct or 
see your jobber. 

LINE & KIMBALL CO. 

Manufacturers of Auto Accessories 

Moose Jaw Saskatchewan 




HARNESS OIL 
NEATSFOOT OIL 



Special Cylinder 
Oil (for steam en- 
gines ). 

A Gas Engine Oil 
(for gasoline en- 
gines). 

Tractorlene O i 1 
(for oil burning 
engmes). 

Ideal Thresher's 
Machines Oil (for 
general use). 
Automobile O i 1 
and Transmission 
Greases. 



PRAIRIE CITY OIL COMPANY, LIMITED, WINNIPEG ^ 





The Perrin No-Glare in an 
Automobile Headlight 



Perrin No -Glare for Auto 
Headlights 

his device gives the best results for the money. Eliminates glare. 

ives good roadlight. Is legal everyvphere. 

atisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 
Retails at $2.25 per pair. Special price to dealers and garages. 
Heads lists of approved devices in Manitoba. 

Western Distributor 

W. W. HICKS, 567 Banning St., WINNIPEG 



"Write for HARDWARE and 
METAL Electro Booklet" 



THE "WANT" AD. 

The "want ad." has srrown from a 
little used force in business life into 
one of the great necessities of th* 
present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to the 
"want ad." as a matter of course for 
a hundred small services. 

The "want ad." gets work for worlt- 
ers and workers for work. 

It gets clerks for employers and flnds 
employers for clerks. It brings to- 
gether buyer and seller, and enables 
them to do business though they may 
be thousands of miles apart. 

The "want ad." is the great f» rce in 
the small affairs and incidents of daily 
life. 



July 13, 1918 HARDWARE AND UETAl^Motor Accessories, Blcjcles and Sporting Goods Section. 



10, 



Pressed Steel and Brass Grease Cups 
Oil Hole Covers and Oil Cups 
Springy Shackle Bolts 
Brass Pattern Makers Dowel Pins 




Ratchet' 




Catalogues and Prices 
Sent Upon Application 



The CANADIAN WINKLEY CO., Ltd. 

WINDSOR. ONT. 



Sixt 

Specialties 



Kemember! All prices advance 10% A-igust 1st, 1918. We have held 

prices down longer than anyone expectod we would, or could. At ih:^ 

advanced piices Marble's Specialties will represent the biggest values 

of their kind in the market. At present figures, considering the great 

increases made by competitors, the .Marble line is ON THE BARGAI.N 

nOLNTER. 

riuce a liberal order with your jobber now— to-day. 



All Prices Advance 
IO%Auaustl^ 




M.irble's Handy Coat Compass 

Never goes wrong. Ati'.aches to outside of coat 
and is wateiproof. Always in sight and bal- 
ances so readily direction can be taken whiK* 
walking. Can not demagnetize. Also made in 
pocket style, liist prices now $1 to $1,30. 

Marble's Folding Fish Knife 

I>oes all the work nee<led to get a tish ready for 
the frying-pan— cuts, rips, scales. Blade has 
ke¥n edge, and is sharp at back of point for 
ripping. The 'back of blajde, as shown, is an 
e.vcelleni scaler. A hunting knife, jack-knife 
and fl.sh knife in one. Can be carried open in 
sheath or closed in pocket. Blade 4 inches. 
Weight. SVo oinices. List price now $1,25. 

Marble's Waterproof Match Box 

.Moisture can't affect matches in a Mai^jli^ 
.Match Box. Opens easily— yet its protection ol 
matches is a'bsolute and certain. The fastest 
selling match ibox on the market for outdooi 
Ijeople. It is well known as a "life saver." 
Made of seamless bra^s about the size of a liy 
gauge shell, fitted witli rubbei'-Iined cover. 
Holds enough matches to last several days. List 
price now 50c, 

Trade Supplied by Jobbers. 
Write for catalog of entire line. 

MARBLE ARMS & MFG. CO. 

5350 Delta Ave., Gladstone, Mich. 





"HELICAL" Door Spriner 



Ready Sales and good profits come from 

NEWMAN'S LINES 

WM. NEWMAN & SONS, LIMITED 

Birmingham, England 

EriQuiries to 

FREDERICK SARA & COMPANY 

Calgary, Alta. 



Be sure to get 
lists and full 
p a r t i c ulars 
now. 

Spring 
Hinges, Floor 
Hinges, Door 
Checks and 
Springs of all 
Kinds, Panic 
Bolts, Fan 
Light Gear- 
ing, etc. 





Regulating 
Spring Hinge 



"Invincible" 
Floor Spring 



108 HARDWARE AND METAL — Motor Acces sories, Bicycles and Sporting Goods Section. July 13, 1918 



The Niagara Jack 

For Medium Sized Cars 
Lifts up to 3,000 Pounds 

This Jack is single-acting — works on short, downward strokes. 

Works between 6 and 12 inches. Main lift operates between 10 
and 16 inches. 

Of best quality Malleable iron, steel pins, steel springs, and maple 
wood handle. Each Jack is thoroughly tested before packing. 
Packed in individual cartons. Shipping weight 5V^j lbs. Retail 
price, $2.75. 

No. 90 Folding Auto Seat 

Hangs on Rear Door of Ford Cars 

A new folding auto seat for Fords. Just what Ford owners are looking 

for. Also 

Channel Box Bumpers for Fords. Channel Box Bumpers for Chevrolet. 

Aichandee Shock Absorbers. Rear Tire Carriers. 

Niagara Auto Jacks. 

Write for prices. Illustrated catalog sent on request. 

SAMUEL TREES & CO., LIMITED 

Distributors of Partridge Tires 





TORONTO m 




This Trade -Mark 
is a guarantee of 
Highest Quality 
and Workmanship 



We specialize 
in, and our 



Plant is fully equipped to produce 

STEEL and BRASS 

STAMPINGS 

of all kinds 

Write us for quotations 

CANADIAN LAMP & STAMPING CO., 

LIMITED 

Makers of the celebrated 
CLASCO Lamps for Motor Cars 

FORD CITY, ONTARIO 



^iiiiiiiihiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimiiiiimm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiimnm^ 



A "No Tools-No Heat" Patch 

That Will Prove its Worth in 

Sales 




For vulcanized patches on inner tubes. 

No burning. No shortening life of inner 

tube. 

A Permanent Repair that costs only a 

few cents. Every customer will want it. 




For further particulars write. 

AIR-TITE MFG., COMPANY 

St. Thomas, Ontario 



July 13, 1918 



HARDWARE AND ME TAT. 



109 




HELP WANTED 



FOR SALE 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Y)17 ANTED — A HARDWARE CLERK, ONE 
'■'^ with seven or eight years' experience pre- 
ferred. Apply stating experience and salary 
expected. Box 306, Hardware and Metal. 



VJ/ANTED— HARDWARE CLERK WITH EX- 
perienee for live town in Sudbury district 
Good position. Give experience, reference and 
salary expected. Apply Box 601. Hardware and 
Metal. 

VyANTED— ON COMMISSION FOR SIDE LINE 
'' traveller calling on hardware or machine 
shops or both for Canada. Apply Mechanic Tool 
Case Mfg. Co., 271 Euclid Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

yOUNG MAN FOR WHOLESALE HARD- 

ware waiehouse, one with some experience in 

blacksmiths' supplies preferred. Apply Edward 

Hplloran. general manager. Kloepfer Limited, 44 

Wellington East. Toronto. 



\y ANTED — A FIRST CLASS 
' ' retail hardware clerk at once; 
one not liable for military service. 
Apply stating age, experience and 
salary required, enclosing testi- 
monials. Manville Hardware Co., 
Prince Albert, Sask. 



c 



SITUATIONS WANTED 

ARABLE AND ENERGETIC HARDWARE- 
man with seventeen years' wholesale and retail 
experience. Conversant with all lines and thor- 
oughly reliable. Can handle position of trust 
satisfactorily. Not likely for military service. 
Seeking permanent position but not interested 
unless good salary offered. Box 109, Hardware 
and Metal. 

FOR SALE 

GOGGLES. 

piVE GROSS GOGGLES, GLASS CENTRE, 
wire guard, elastic connecting the two parts, 
one in a tin box. Send for sample if interested. 
■ST. 75 gross. Box 503, Hardware and Metal, 128 
Bleury St., Montreal. 

LAMP AND LANTERN BURNERS 

1 QQ DOZEN REED'S PERFECT BRASS LAMP 
Burners, with cone reflectors. Size B, 
$1.50 doz. ; 10 doz. size A, $1.15 doz. ; 10 doz. 
lantern Reed burners (brass), $1.50 doz.; 100 
doz. job Banner brass lamp burners, 7.5c doz. 
It's up to you if you want a bargain. Box 504, 
Hardware and Metal, 128 Bleury St., Montreal. 



HORSE NAILS 
Q BRAND GUARANTEED FIRST QUALITY, 
■ only numbers 4, 5, 6. Packed in 1 lb. boxes. 
Any quantity, one-half the market price. Box 
505, Hardware and Metal, 128 Bleury St., Mont- 
real. 

ENGLISH KNIFE POLISH 
"pEN DOZEN, 1 LB. BOX, 1 DOZEN IN WOOD 
cases. Unobtainable now. $1.75 doz. Box 
Box 508, Hardware and Metal, 128 Bleury St.. 
real. 



LANTERNS 

pEN DOZEN COLD BLAST LANTERNS, 
painted red, at $6.50 doz. Three dozen with 
reflectors at $8 doz. First answer, first served. 
Box .507, Hardware and Metal, 128 Bleury St., 
Montreal. 

pOR SALE— HARDWARE BUSINESS IN ALT- 
^ berta. About $4,000 will handle. Write for 
particulars. Box 98. Hardware and Metal. 

r^ENTRALLY LOCATED IN TORONTO, ES- 
tablished retail hardware business for sale. 
Low rental and expenses. Ninety per cent, of 
business cash. Complete modern equipment and 
fixtures. Clean stock. Terms, half cash, balance 
arranged. Total about six thousand. Box 110. 
Hardware and Metal. 

pOR SALE— CHEAP, SIX-DRAWER NATION- 

al cash register, stands on floor. Russill 

Hardware Co.. 126 King St. East, Toronto, Ont. 

prARDWARE STOCK AND BUSINESS FOR 
sale in live town of 800. First-ela86 farmers' 
trade. Hydro just coming in. Apply Box 868. 
Hardware and Metal. 

AGENCIES WANTED 

jV/TATSIUFACTURERS DESIRING REPRESEN- 
tation in Province of Quebec are requested 
to send catalogue and communicate with John- 
ston Brokerage & Drayage Co., Sherbrooke, Que. 
Nine years' hardware experience, both languages, 
good connections. 

'pO REPLACE FOREIGN AGENCIES WHICH 
we have to drop on account of the war we are 
open for proposition from Canadian manufactur- 
ers of machinery, hardware and saddlery special- 
ties with the view of acting as selling agents in 
the Province uf Quebec. Eight ypars' experience. 
Strictly first-class references can be furnished and 
cash guarantee if necessary. Correspondence in- 
vited. International Agency. 416 St. Nicholas 
BIdg., Montreal. 



A /TANUFACTURERS DESIRING RE- 
presentation in Montreal and the 
Province of Quebec are requested to send 
catalogs and to communicate with Imper- 
ial Supply Co., 104 Delorimier Ave., Mont- 
real. 



.w 



MISCELLANEOUS 

7E ARE IN THE MARKET FOR ALL KINDS 



and classes of iron and steel and its pro- 
ducts. Kindly write us stating what you have 
to ofl'er, submitting full particulars. Will fur- 
nish letter of credit with order. W. F. Burns 
Co.. 56 Pine St., N.Y.C. ^ 

vyAREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING 

systems. Tay lor-Fot be» Company, Ltd. Sup- 
olied by the trade throughout Canada ftf' 

pOOD STENOGRAPHERS ARE WHAT EVERY 
^ employer wants. The place to get good 
•tcnographers is at the Remington Employment 
Department. No charge for the service. Reming- 
ton Typewriter Co.. Ltd.. 144 Ray St.. Toront/- 

T^OUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE— BY IN- 
stalHng an Otis-Fensom hand-power elevator 
you can use upper floors as stock room or extrfi 
)el)<ng space, and increase space on ground floor 
Costs only $70. Write for catalogue "B." Oti» 
Fensom Elevator Co., Toronto. 



i,UrTi 1>ULLAK& TIED UP IM OLl> Fix- 
tures that you are no longer using would 
make a lot of money for you if invested in stock 
and turned over three or four times a year. Get 
your money out, by selling the fixtures to one 
uf Hardware and Metal's readers who may be 
looking for exactly what you have to offer. 

A DOING TYPEWRITER WRll'E, ADD OR 
subtract in one operation. Elliott Fisher, 
Limited. Room 314 Stair Building. Toronto. 

piHE SUREST WAY FOR THE MANUFAC- 

turers' agent to connect with good live flmu. 
is to tell the manufacturers who read Hardware 
and Metal, all about his ability to sell their 
goods. Try an advertisement on the Condensed 
Ad. Page of Hardware and Metal, under this 
*T»«dinc 



Getting Results 

A large firm in a Western 
Canada city recently advertised 
in Hardware and Metal Want 
.'Vd. Page for a man to fill a re- 
sponsible position — result 21 re- 
plies. This indicates that the 
want ad. page is followed close- 
ly. The man YOU want to 
reach is reading this page. 



-ja- 



Get a Share of the 
Vol-Peek Demand 

Vol-Peek is a splendid little 
specialty that enables every 
housewife to mend leaky pots, 
pans, etc., quickly and easily 
ind without the aid of any tools. 
At a cost of about ',4 cent a 
mend! 

Show Vol-Peek on your sales 
counter. There's a good pvofit 
on every sale and Vol-Peek al- 
ways satisfies. 

At your wholesaler or from iis 
diredt. 

H. NAGLE & CO. 
Box 2024 - - Montreal 



fifteen cents 



110 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 13, 19:3 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Oecasionally advertisements are inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the 

advertiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is 

inserted solely for the convenieuee of the readers of the paper. 



A 

Ackland, D.. & Sons 73 

Acme Steel Goods Co., Ltd 90 

Acme Waste Mfg. Co.. Ltd.... 90 

Atkins, E. C, & Co 14 

Air Tite Mfg. Co 108 

Allen. L. B., Co.. Inc 92 

American Pad & Textile Co.... 81 

American Shearer Co 4 

Allith Mfg. Co 23 

B 

Barnett, G. & H., Co 69 

Beatty Bros 10 

Belleville Hardware & Lock 

Mfg. Co 24 

Berry Bros 59 

Bowser. S. F.. & Co 103 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ltd. 24 

1 v-i<= 1* Co 90 

Brantford Cordage Co., Ltd. . . 88 

Buc er & Co.. Geo 2-5 



Calander, J., Mfg. Co 89 

Cameron & Campbell 86 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co 103 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd 103 

Canada Glue Co 91 

Canada Linseed Oil Co 55 

Canada Metal Co 61 

Canada Steel Goods Co 6 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co. .4, 20, 98 

Can. Consolidated Rubber Co... 26 
Can. Foundries & Forgings Co., 

Ltd 21 

Canadian General Electric Co. 101 

Canadian Lamp & Stamping Co. 108 

Can. Pneumatic Tool Co 100 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co 87 

Canadian Warren Axe Co 12 

Canadian, The, Winkley Co., 

Ltd 107 

Cane, William, & Son 4 

Cannon, The, Oiler Co., suc- 

sess'crs to R. E Bloomer. . . 92 

Carter White Lead Co 65 

Cartland & Son, Jas 20 

Chesterman & Co., Jas 110 

Christiansen Implements, Ltd.. 104 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 81 

Climax Baler Co 92 

Clipner Lawn Mower Co 92 

Coghlin, B. J., Co., Ltd 87 

Collette Mfg. Co 77 

Colts Patent Fire Arms Mfg. 

Co 104 



D 

Davidson Mfg. Co., The Thos.. 6 

Delta File Works 89 

Dennis Wire & Iron Co.. Ltd.. 89 

DesRochers Limited 92 

Diamond Saw & Stamp'g Wks. 92 

Disston. Henry & Sons, Inc. . . 13 

Dominion Battery Co 17 

Dominion Cartridge Co 35 

Dominion Iron & Steel Co. ... 25 

Dominion Linseed Oil Co 

Front Cover 
Dominion Sheet Metal Co. . . . 

Inside Back Cover 

Dougall Vj'rnish Co., Ltd- . . 75 
Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods 

Co 95 

Duluth Show Case Co 81 

E 

Empire Mfg. Co 67 

G 

Gilbert* Barker 94 

Gipe-Hazard Co., Ltd 91 

Goodell-Pratt Com-oanv n 

Griffiths & Co., Geo. W 91 

Great West E''"'*'-''- Cn 100 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Co. . . 

Inside Back Cover 

H 

Hamilton Stamn & Stencil Wks. 92 

Homer & Wi'Iso- 91 

Howland H S., Sons Co., Ltd. 7 

Hicks. W. W 106 

Hutton. .T->s.. & Co 91 

Hyslop Bros., Limited 96 

I 

Imperial Oil 8-93 

J 

.lamieson & Co.. R. C 63 

Jardine & Co., A. B 24 

Jenninfrs, Rus.sell. Mfg. Co. . . 91 
Johns-Manville Co.. Ltd., The 

H. W 102 

K 

Keystone Mfg. Co., The 83 

Kinzinger. Bruce & Co. ...92-106 

Kloepfer, C, Ltd 90 

L 

Laidlaw Bale Tie Co 83 

Lamolough, F. W.. Co 92 



Landers. Frary & Clark 2 

Lane, Will B 105 

Lewis Bros., Ltd 3 

Line & Kimball Co 106 

Lockwood Ash Motor Co. . . 16 

London Bolt & Hinge Works.. 91 

London Rolling Mills Co 86 

Low, A. G., & Co 104 

Lufkin Rule Co. ..Inside back cover 



M 



Manitoba Steel & Iron Co., Ltd. 73 

Marble Arms & Mfg. Co 107 

Martin, A. G 92 

Martin, The L., Co 83 

McArthur, Alex., & Co 65 

McComb, Ltd., J. H 87 

McDougall, R., Co., Ltd 59 

McKinnon Industries, Limited. 

Back Cover 
Medalta Stoneware, Ltd., The 25 
Merchants Hardware Special- 
ties, Limited 69 

Metal Specialties Mfg. Co 102 

Metallic Roofing Co 13 

Michelin Tire Co 97 

Moore, Benjamin, & Co., Ltd.. 55 

Morrison, James, Brass Co. . . 65 

Myers. F. E., & Bros 89 

N 

Nagle. H., Mfg. Co 109 

National Hardware Co 92 

National Manufacturing Co. . 5 
National Stamping & Electric 

Co 91 

Newman & Sons, Ltd., Wm... 107 

Nicholson File Co 12 

North American Hardware Sup- 
ply Co 105 

Northern Bolt, Screw & Wire 

Co., Ltd 83 

Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co. . 83 







Oakey, John, & Sons, Ltd. ... 89 

Otterville Mfg. Co 89 

Owl Metal Co., Ltd 86 



Parmenter, Bulloch Co.. The... 92 

Peterboro Lock Mfg. Co 87 

Pink, Thos., & Co 

Inside Back Cover 

Plewes. Ltd 77 

"^-rt Hope File Mfg. Co 77 



Prairie City Oil Co., Ltd. ... 106 
Progressive Mfg. Co 87 



Ramsay, A., & Son ,57 

Reed & Co., Ltd., Geo. W 61 

Renfrew Machinery Co., Ltd. . 79 

Rice Lewis & Son l 

Rideau Specialty Co 92' 

Rock Island Mfg. Co 59 

Russell-Jennings Co 91 



Sharratt & Newth 86 

Shipman, Harold C, & Co. ... 92 

Sohultz Mfg. Co 23 

Simms & Co., T. S 67 

Simonds Canada Saw Co.. Ltd., 

Montreal 22 

Spielman Agencies 92 

Stanley Rule & Level Co. ... 10 

Stanley Works 30 

Starrett, L. S.. Co 15 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 9 

Stephens, G. F., Co 71 

Stevens, Hepner Co 79 

Still Mfg. Co., J. H 79 



Tallman Brass & Metal Co. . . 107 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd 20 

Taylor, W -i 

Thermoid Rubber Co 99 

Thompson, B. & S., Co., Ltd. 79 

Toronto Lock Mfg. Co 

Inside Front Cover 
Toronto Plate Glass Importing 

Co 69 

Trees, & Co., Samuel 108, 

Trimont Mfg. Co 14 

V 

United Brass Founders & En- 
gineers 38 

Victor Saw Works 19 

Volpeek Mfg. Co 109 



W 



Ward & Payne 

Western Wire Nail Co 

Wheeler & Bain -_•». 

White Mop Wringer Mfg. Co. 
Wilckes-Martin-Wilc'ces Co. 

Wilkinson & Kompass 

Williams, J. H., & Co. . . . 

Woods, Wfl'ter, & Co 

Wroug-ht Washer Co 



22 
89 
89 
75 
"2 
90 
81 
75 
77 



Improved Patent Flush 
Handle 



TRADE MARKS 

cO^STAJVr/^ 



CHESTERMAIi'S-{J> =:S^ 

treIble 



MEASURINGTAPES 



Engineers' 
Small 
Tools 




F. H. SCOTT, 404 Coristine Bldg., Montreal 



Steel Feeler Gauge 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PINE'S LUMBERING TOOLS 

The Standard Tools in every province of the Dominion, New Zealand, 

Australia, etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of lumber tools. Light and Durable. 

LONG DISTANCE PHONE No. 87 

Send for Catalogue and Price List. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware 

Merchants. 



THE THOS. PINK COMPANY. LIMITED 

Manufacturers of Lumber Tools 
PEMBROKE ONTARIO 




It's a Pink any- 
way you take it, 
and it's the best 
Peavey made. 



"Multiped" 

The Garden Hose That Doesn't Kink 




A MOULDED, CORRUGATED HOSE OF EXTRAORDINARY 
STRENGTH, MADE IN LENGTHS OF ABOUT 500 FEET. 



GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER, LIMITED 

Toronto, Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Fort William, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Lethbrid|:e, Calgrary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Victoria 



MANUFACTURED 
SOLELY BY 



VFK/rt 



MEASURING TAPES 



Stand on a Record of Performance as well as 
a Guarantee 




FROM THE 

Common "Ass Skin" Tape to the Finest Engineers' 
Patterns 

^/nAtamtameouux^ Readings, Nubian (dark) Finish, Metal- 
ined Cases, Improved Reels, Etc. 

Stocked by Hardware and Supply Jobbers. 

W/JVDSO/tONK 




Send for Catalog 




1 



f.^^ 



DREADNAUGHT 



Steel Hames 



Doubletrees 



Designed and built on scientific principles. The two 
pieces of selected steel forming the body of Dread- 
naught Hames reinforce each other, as do the steel 
rod and wood of Dreadnaught Doubletrees. They 
form a perfect Truss — the strongest possible con- 
struction. They are mechanically correct. For the 
heavy pulls and terrific strains of rough spring work 
they have no equal. 

HELP THE FARMERS PLOW DEEP 

We need big crops. Equip your farmers with 
Dreadnaught Hames and Doubletrees so they can 
do their bit. Write to-day for prices and descrip- 
tion of these dependable, profit-making lines. 

McKinnon Industries, Ltd. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO 



No. 8382 



No. 8382 



Two Piece 
Double 
Strength 



Anti-Rust 
Treated 
Durable 



June .9 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



107 




HELP WANTED 



WANTED — A HARDWARE CLERK, ONE 
•' with seven or eight years' experience pre- 
ferred. Apply stating experience and salary 
expected. Box 306, Hardware and Metal. 

Y\/ANTED— EXPERIENCED PAINT TRAVEL- 
^^ ier for territory between Winnipeg and Van- 
couver. Apply stating salary desired, experience, 
and if subject to Military Service Act. A. Ram- 
say & Son, Co., Montreal. 



FOR SALE 



TVTATIONAL CASH REGISTER — THREE- 
drawer electric. Like a new machine. Box 
315, Hardware and Metal. 

ABOXTT TWELVE HUNDRED POUNDS SASH 
weights, assorted ; also a quantity of pipe 
fittings, 'Phone North 435, Toronto. 

A SET OF THREE BOWSER PUMPS AND 
tanks, suitable for oils, turps, etc. Also 
Bowser gasoline pump and tank, underground ; 
all in first-elass condition. Terms may be ar- 
ranged with responsible buyer. Box 309, Hard- 
ware and Metal. 

AN OLD ESTABLISHED HARDWARE BUSI- 
ness in a border town in Eastern Ontario : rea- 
son for selling, poor health. Apply N. Willard & 
Co.. Prescott, Ont. 

TTARDWARE STOCK AND BUSINESS FOR 
-^•*- sale in live town of 800. Firat-olasB fanners' 
trade. Hydro just coming in. Apply Box 869, 
Hardware and Metal. 

Tj^OR SALE— BUILDING AND HARDWARE 
■*- stock in good live Saskatchewan village. Stock 
on hand about $6,000. Living rooms above. 
Good opportunity and terms for right man. Box 
726. Hardware and Metal. 

T7ARDWARE BUSINESS FOR SALE. STOCK 
^-' albout $25,000: right on the main street: 
buildings 25 x 120. two-story : owner retiring. 
Apply P.O. Box 275, Sudbury. Ont. 

HARDWARE AND FURNITURE BUSINESS 
FOR SALE. 

QN ACCOUNT OF THE DEATH OF ONE OF 
the partners the hardware and furniture busi- 
ness formerly carried on under the name of 
Stewart Bros., Tilbury, Ont., will be sold. Stock 
in trade about $10.000 ; fixtures about $1.500 : 
also store 26 feet wide, fronting on Main Street. 
S5 feet deep, fronting on Young Street: lot 115 
feet long, with alley 12 feet wide at the back. 
Width of lot at the back, 82 feet. The buildine 
is a first-class two-storey brick, and the stock in 
trade is all new within three years. Business 
has been established thirty years, and has 
several first class agencies, including McClary's. 
Martin-Senour. Plymouth Binder Twine, etc. In 
addition to the lot there is another lot 66 by 
120 feet, with weigh scales and coal sheds and 
stables. In the meantime business is being carried 
on as a going concern. Terms cash or approved 
securities. Applications will be received up to 
July 1st by Mr. Harry Collins. Chatham. Ontario. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

M7AREHOUSE AND FACTORY HXATmO 

'' syiteraa. Taylor-Fokbes Company, Ltd. Sap> 

pHed by the trade throuchout Canada (tf) 



This page is the logical place 
for anyone in the Canadian 
hardware trade to place his 
"condensed" advertisements if 
he wants anything that can be 
supplied by any other Canadian 
hardwareman. 



Do you want a clerk or store 
manager? 

Do you want a position as 
clerk or travelling sales- 
man? 

Do you want a traveller? 

Do you want to sell or ex- 
change your business? 

Do you want to buy a hard- 
ware business? 

Do you want to buy or sell 
any store equipment? 

If so, sit down now, and draft an 
advertisement for Hardware and 
Metal's "Wanted" page, setting 
forth just what you want, and 
stating your needs or qualifications. 

Such an advertisement will auto- 
matically seek out for you, the only 
people you want to reach — those 
who are actively engaged in sell- 
ing hardware, in Canada. 

The cost? 

Trifling! Two cents per word for 
first insertion and one cent per 
word for each subsequent insertion 
of the same advertisement. Each 
figure is counted as a word, and a 
charge of 5 cents extra per inser- 
tion is made when Box Number is 
required. In this way the adver- 
tiser's name is kept confidential. 

Copy for Condensed Advertise- 
ments should reach the Toronto 
office of Hardware and Metal not 
later than Thursday morning to 
catch the current week's issue. In 
order to save unnecessary corres- 
pondence and bookkeeping, please 
remit with copy, preferably by 
money order. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

T^O REPLACE FOREIGN AGENCIES WHICH 
we have to drop on account of the war we are 
open for proposition from Canadian manufactur- 
ers of machinery, hardware and saddlery special- 
ties with the view of acting as selling agents in 
the Province of Quebec. Eight years' experience. 
Strictly first-class references can be furnished and 
cash guarantee if necessary. Correspondence in- 
vited. International Agency, 416 St. Nicholas 
Bldg., Montreal. 

/^OOD STENOGRAPHERS ARE WHAT EVERY 
^ employer wants. The place lo get good 
•tenographers is at the Remington Employment 
Department. No charge for the service. Reming- 
ton Typewriter Co.. Ltd.. 144 Bay St.. Toronto. 

r\OUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE— BY IN- 
stalling an Otis-Fensom hand-power elevator 
you can use upper floors as stock room or extra 
•el'ing space, and increase space on ground floor. 
Costs only $70. Write for catalogue "B," Oti»- 
Fensom Elevator Co., Toronto. 

piFTY DOLLARS TIED UP IN OLD Fix- 
tures that you are no longer using would 
make a lot of money for you if invested In stock 
and turned over three or four times a year. Get 
your money out, by selling the fixtures to one 
of Hardware and Metal's readers who may be 
looking for exactly what you hare to offer. 

A DDING TYPEWRITER WRITE. ADD OR 
subtract in one operation. Elliott Fisher. 
Limited. Room 314 Stair Building, Toronto. 

TV/TAN UFACTURERS DESIRING REPRESEN- 
tation in Montreal and the Province of Que- 
bec are requested to send catalogs and to com- 
municate with Imperial Supply Co., 104 Delorimier 
Ave., Montreal. 




I 



— a specialty that 
every housewife 
needs 



Leaking po's are common in 
every home. 

Vol-Peek mends all such 
quickly and easily. Pots. 
Pans, Graniteware, .Alumi- 
num vessels — all can be made 
ready for use in two minutes 
with a little bit of Vol-Peeli. 
Sells at a good profit. Write 
us direct if your wholesaler 
hasn't got it. 

H. NAGLE & CO. 

Box 2024, Montreal 



I 



108 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 29, 1918 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Oecasionally advertisements are inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the 

advertiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is 

inserted solely for the convenience of the readers of the paper. 



Ackland. D., & Sons G9 

Acme Steel Goods Co., Ltd. . . S4 

Acme Vi^aste Mfg. Co., Ltd. . . 84 

Adams & Elting 94 

Allen. L. B., Co., Inc 106 

American Pad & Textile Co. . . 7.3 

American Shearer Co 4 

American Rolling Mills Co. . . 17 

Ashdown Hdwe. Co., J. H. ... 91 

Atkins, E. C, & Co 13 

Barnett, G. & H., Co 65 

Beatty Bros 18 

Belleville Hardware & Lock 

Mfg. Co 23 

Berry Brv-- 55 

Bowser, S. F.. & Co 101 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ltd. 23 

Bishopric Wall Board Co 73 

Butterfield & Co 22 

Calanaer, J., Mfg. Co 108 

Cameron & Campbell 87 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co. . . 101 

Canada Dry Cells, Ltd 83 

Canada Glue Co 85 

Canada Linseed Oil Co 65 

Canada Metal Co 57 

Canada Steel Goods Co 6 

Can. Fiiirbanks-Morse Co. ...20-22 

Can. Consolidated Rubber Co. . . 24 
Can. Foundries & Forgings Co., 

Ltd 14 

Canadian Lamp & Stamping Co. 104 

Can. Pneumatic Tool Co 101 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co 86 

Canadian Tungsten Lamp Co. . . 106 

Canadian Warren Axe Co 12 

Canadian, The, Winkley Co., 

Ltd 102 

Cane, William, & Son 23 

Carter White Lead Co 71 

Champion Spark Plug Co. of 

Canada, Ltd 99 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 23 



Climax Baler Co 106 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co 106 

Coghlin, B. J., Co., Ltd 86 

Collette Mfg. Co 104 

Davidson, Thos 6 

Delta File Works 87 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Wks. 106 
Dominion Sheet Metal Co., Ltd. 

Inside back cover 
Dougall Varnish Co.. Ltd., The 71 
Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods 

Co., Limited 95 

Dupont de Nemours & Co.. E. J. 103 

Empire Mfg. Co 63 

Eureka Planter Co 105 

Ford Motor Co 96 

Gilbert & Barker 90 

Gilbert-Menzies, The A. C, Co., 

Ltd 10 

Gipe-Hazard Co., Ltd 85 

Great West Electric Co 93 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Co. ... 

Inside back cover 
Harrington & Richardson Arms 

Co 98 

Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Wks. 106 

Homer & Willson 94 

Howland. H. S., Sons Co., Ltd. 7 

Hicks. W. W 103 

Hutton, Jas., & Co 85 

Imperial Oil 8 

International Sales Co 55 

Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle 

Works 102 

Jamieson & Co., R. C 59 

Jardine & Co., A. B 79 

Jennings. Russell, Mfg. Co. ... 85 

K&S Tire Co 92 

Kinzinger, Bnice & Co. ...100-106 

Kloepfer, C, Ltd 84 

Laidlaw Bale Tie Co 23 

Lamplough, F. W., Co 106 

Landers, Frary & Clark 2 

Lane, Will B 98 

Lewis Bros., Ltd 3 



Line & Kimball Co 102 

London Bolt & Hinge Works . 85 

London Rolling Mills Co 87 

Low, A. G., & Co 104 

Lufkin Rule Co. ..Inside back cove' 
Manitoba Steel & Iron Co., Ltd. 69 

Martin, A. G 106 

Martin. The L., Co 7S 

Mc^ithur, Alex., & Co 63 

McConib, Ltd.. J. H 86 

McDougall, R., Co., Ltd 73 

McKinnon Industries, Limited . 

Back Cover 
Merchants Hardware Specialties, 

Limited 81 

Metallic Roofing Co 13 

Michelin Tire Co 97 

Moore, Benjamin, & Co., Ltd. 51 
Morrison. James, Brass Co. ... 19 

Myers, F. E.. & Bros 55 

Nagle. H., Mfg. Co 107 

National Hardware Co 106 

National Manufacturing Co. . 6 
National Stamping & Electric 

Co 85 

Nicholson File Co .12 

North American Hardware Sup- 
ply Co 100 

Northern Bolt, Screw & Wire 

Co.. Ltd 63 

Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co... 108 

Oakey, John, & Sons. Ltd b'> 

Otterville Mfg. Co 55 

Owl Metal Co., Ltd 55 

Pai-menter, Bulloch Co., The. . 106 

Patineaude & Berini 81 

Peterboro Lock Mfg. Co S(> 

Pink. Thos., & Co 

Inside back cover 

Plewes, Ltd 25-106 

Plymouth Cordage Co 11 

Port Hope File Mfg. Co. ... 79 

The Powerlight Co 94 

Prairie City Oil Co., Ltd. ... 9i 
Progressive Mfg. Co 86 



Ramsay, A., & Son 53 

Reed & Co., Ltd., Geo. W 57 

Renfrew Machinery Co., Ltd. . 75 

Rice Lewis & Son 1 

Rideau Specialty Co 106 

Russell-Jennings Co 85 

Sharratt & Newth 87 

Shipman, Harold C, & Co.... lOS 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Ltd., 

Montreal 4 

Sphinx Manufacturing Co 

Front cover 

Spielman Agencies 106 

Standard Tube & Fence Co. . . 84 

Stanley Rule & Level Co 16 

Stanley Works 26 

Star Mfg. Co 108 

Stark Rolling Mill Co., The ... 21 

Starrett, L. S.. Co 15 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 9 

Stephens, G. F., Co 67 

Stevens. Hepner Co 75 

Still Mfg. Co.. J. H 75 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co. ... 100 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd 18 

Taylor. W 84 

Thompson. B. & S., Co., Ltd. 20 
Toronto Plate Glass Importing 

Co 65 

Trimont Mfg. Co 16 

Vokes Hdwe. Co. Inside front cover 

Volpeok Mfg. Co 107 

Ward & Payne 19 

Western Wire Nail Co 108 

Wheeler & Bain 108 

White Mop Wringer Mfg. Co. 77 
Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co., 

The 20 

Wilckes-Martin-Wilckes Co. ... 106 

Wilkinson & Kompass 84 

Williams, J. H., & Co 71 

Williams Bros. & Piggott .... 77 

Woods. Walter, & Co 77 

Wrought Washer Co 79 



MILBRADT LADDERS 




will pay for themselves in a 
short time by enabling you 
to wait on more trade, save 
the wear and tear on your 
fixtures and goods, as well 
as bring the appearance of 
your store up to date. 

Write to J. H. Ashdown 
Hdwe. Co.. Ltd., Winnipeg; 
Marshall - Wells Co., Ltd.. 
Winnipetr, or direct for cata- 
log giving prices of a large 
namber of styles we manu- 
facture, suitable for all 
kinds of shelving. 

John Calander Mfg. Co. 

ISS E. 13th Street. 
St. Paul. Minn., U.S.A. 




If you want easy-fit- 
ting eavetrough and 
conductor pipe, etc., 
order from us. 

WHEELER & BAIN 

TORONTO 



Elgin Wrenches 




stand for Convenience and Service. 

Excel in appearance, finish, durability. 
The convenient ■wrench for Inconvenient 
places. Convenient to use, easy to carry, 
effective in results. 

STAR MANUFACTURING CO. 

Carpentersville, HI., U.S.A. 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 

& COAL CO., Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 




Getting Results 

A large firm in a Western 
Canada city recently advertised 
in Hardware and Metal Want 
Ad. Page for a man to fill a re- 
sponsible position — result 21 re- 
plies. This indicates that the 
want ad. page is followed close- 
ly. The man YOU want td" 
reach is reading this page. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PINK'S LUMBERING TOOLS 

The Standard Tools in every province of the Dominion, New Zealand, 

Australia, etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of lumber tools. Light and Durable. 

LONG DISTANCE PHONE No. 87 

Send for Catalogue and Price List. ' 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware 

Merchants. 

THE THOS. PINK COMPANY. LIMITED 

Manufacturers of Lumber Tools "'^ ^ ^'"'}, ^"yr 

way you take it, 
PEMBROKE ONTARIO PeavJy made/"'* 




"Multiped" 



The Garden Hose That Doesn't Kink 




A MOULDED, CORRUGATED HOSE OF EXTRAORDINARY 
STRENGTH, MADE IN LENGTHS OF ABOUT 500 FEET. 



GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER, LIMITED 

Toronto, Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Fort William, Winnipeg:, Reg-ina, Saskatoon, Lethbridge, Calgary, Edmonton, Vanconver, Victoria 



MANUFACTURED 
SOLELY BY 







RELIABLE 



in every way 

From the selection of the boxwood, its season 
ing, the assembling, graduating and finishins; 
of the rule, a uniform and high quality product. 
A. complete line. 



Send for catalogue 



W/ND30R.0NT. 




Ask your jobber. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




DREADNAUGHT 



Steel Hames 



Doubletrees 



Designed and built on scientific principles. The two 
pieces of selected steel forming the body of Dread- 
naught Hames reinforce each other, as do the steel 
rod and wood of Dreadnaught Doubletrees. They 
form a perfect Truss — the strongest possible con- 
struction. They are mechanically correct. For the 
heavy pulls and terrific strains of rough spring work 
they have no equal. 

HELP THE FARMERS PLOW DEEP 

We need big crops. Equip your farmers with 
Dreadnaught Hames and Doubletrees so they can 
do their bit. Write to-day for prices and descrip- 
tion of these dependable, profit-making lines. 

McKinnon Industries, Ltd. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO 



No. 8382 

Two Piece 

Double 

Strength 




No. 83S2 

Anti-Rust 

Treated 

Durable 



Vol. XXX 
No. 29 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY SINCE 1888 
THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 



July 20 
1918 



ELEPHANT 



GENUINE 



WHITE LEAD 




CANADA'S FAVORITE 

THE CANADA PAINT CO. 



LIMITED 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Westclox 

— the trade -mark on the dials of ^ood alarm clocks 




THE alarm clock has outgrown 
its name. It started life as a 
wake-up call; and now it is 
used more often as a timepiece 
than as a call-clock. 

To ring on time an alarm clock 
must run on time. So today, in the 
home, in business, in industry, — 
everywhere — the good alarm clock 
is known as an efficient, economical 
timekeeper. 

In most homes, it starts the day. 
Then its duties have just begun. It 
has become the household time- 
keeper because it is accurate, de- 
pendable, willing. 

Lots of homes use more than one 
alarm clock. You find them telling 
time in the kitchen, living-room, 
bathroom, laundry, and garage. 

In shops, offices and stores where 
service counts for more than show, 
you find alarm clocks on duty. 

In these uses as a timekeeper, the 
alarm clock has made good. 



Whenever a practical timepiece 
is needed, put an alarm clock on 
the job. 

Westclox alarms have done much 
to raise the standard of alarm clock 
efficiency. 

A better method of clock making 
is back of Westclox success. All 
JVestclox alarms have this patented 
construction. Needle-fine pivots of 
polished steel greatly reduce friction 
in the movement. 

That is why Westclox are such 
good timekeepers. That is why it 
has been impossible to supply the 
demand for Westclox even with an 
output that has increased steadily 
from year to year. 

Your dealer will be glad to show 
you the Westclox line. A choice of 
styles at different prices. They all 
bear the family name, Westclox) that 
is your guaranty of good time-keep- 
ing. Look for the word, Westclox, 
on the dial of the alarm you buy. 



Western Clock Co. -makers of Westclox 

BiaBen Baby Ben Pocket Ben America Lookout Ironclad Bin^o -Sleep-Meter 

La Salle, 111.. U. S. A. Factories at Peru, 111. 




This is what we said to your customers in the July 13th issue of the Saturday Evening Post and otlier National mediums 

Western Clock Co., Toronto Office, 58-64 Wellington St. West 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Priest's Toilet 
Clippers 

Making Clippers for fifty years 
has given us an experience that 
reflects in the quality of our 
line. Ask your jobber about 
Priest's Clippers. 

A. MacFarlane & Co. Wiebusch & Hilger, Ltd. 
Montreal, Canada New York City 

Selling Agents 



= ^ 



SMALL 

Taps, Dies, Reamers, 
Milling Cutters, Drills 

Highest Grade Materials — Expert Workmen- 
Quality absolutely guaranteed. 

PRATT & WHITNEY CO., 
OF CANADA, LTD. 

Dundas Ontario Canada 

Montreal, 723 Dniramond BIdg. ; Vancouver, 
609 Bank of Ottawa Bldg. ; Winnipeg, 1205 
McArthur BIdg. 



M: 



fM 



: iiiuiiniiiniiiMflfium 



! »•■■■■■ ■iiMii.i««». Ill ■■■iq anani 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 191S 



UNIVERSAL 




UNIVERSAL 

TAKES TME WORK OUT OF IRONING DAY 



UNIVERSAL 
Window Cut-Out 



UNIVERSAL Advertising justifies 
itself in volume of sales, but it isn't 
all printers' ink. 

The best UNIVERSAL Advertis- 
ing is the satisfaction delivered by 
the goods themselves. 

UNIVERSAL Electric 
Home Needs 

satisfy every demand for utility and 
their beauty of design and finish are 
famous. 

You can make a handsome profit 
selling UNIVERSAL appliances for 
gifts. The line is so complete that 
every customer can satisfy his whims 
—be his ideas extravagant or mo'dest. 

When you sell the UNIVERSAL 
line you swing this business your 
way. 

A postcard to us brings our catalog 
and suggestions for capturing profit- 
able trade in fancy goods. 



LANDERS, FRARY & CLARK, New Britain, Conn. 

Canadian Representatives : 

A. MACFARLANE & CO., LTD., MONTREAL 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TOUR STORE 





Order a Sample NOW / 

LEWIS BROS., LIMITED 

AGENTS 

MO NTRE AL 



Don't judge it 
by the price 

It's as good in every re- 
spect as any of the high- 
priced fans. 

Even at the above low 
price it pays the retailer 
a good profit. 



BLADE 6 

HEIGHTS 

WEIGHT 3 LBS. 

5 oz. 



Equipped with 8-foot 
cord and plug. 

Adjustable to any angle 



^ 




If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL ■ July 20, 1918 



The Famous 

Improved Stanley Planes. A 
Wide Variety — Fully Guaranteed 
Ready For Immediate Shipment! 

^Caverhill, Learmont Mail Orders 



For fifty years Stanley planes have 
been the recognized standard and 
have been constantly improved 
to meet modern requirements. 

A Plane for Every Purpose 

We have 125 varieties with which to fill your 
customer's varied requirements. 

Cutters made from the finest quality steel, tem- 
pered and ground by an improved process and 
honed ready for use. 

Be sure and order by name — The genuine 
Stanley Plane. Sales will be quicker and pro- 
fits larger than with slow selling substitutes. 

^^The Mail Order House with a 
reputation to maintain.'' 

CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO. 

MONTREAL 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOLE TO ADJUST HANGER 
AND OIL BEARINGS 





""»•■! iCjl,'/.'"'-'"'" •iiwti!..i.ii" " 



No. 88 Adjustable is built 
to hang on and stay on 

Demonstrate how easily Model No. 88 can be adjusted vertic- 
ally and laterally after the door is in position. 

Show the prospect how easy it is to operate and how simple 
is the construction. 

Point out HOW it will always hang close to the rail. 

No. 88 Hanger is fully flexible and is equipped with our 
Improved Storm-proof Rail which really protects. 1 1 i s 
packed the "National way," with everything necessary to its 
hanging, including a set of illustrated directions. 

Have you a "National" Catalog? 

A post card will bring you one. Address 

National Manufacturing Company 

STERLING, ILLINOIS 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 



THE ROLLSTON IS THE EASIEST AND MOST ACCURATE 
WORKING CLOTHES LINE PULLEY MADE 



The Wheel is large, 
which permits easy 
running. 

The Guides adapt 
themselves to all con- 
ditions and prevent 
line getting out of the 
groove in wheel. 




The Frame is made of 
heavy gauge steel — 
never binds, and per- 
mits free action. 

Its entire construction 
allows the line to 
work easily and give 
years of service and 
satisfaction. 



It's an exceptionally good selling article that sHdws quick, big, profitable cash returns. 

Manufactured by 

CANADA STEEL GOODS COMPANY, LIMITED 

HAMILTON, CANADA 




Davidson's Well Known 

FROST RIVER 

Refrigerator shown herewith 

Made entirely of Sheet Steel Galvanized 

The exterior is Japanned French Grey, beautifully finished with 
neatly decorated panels and corner scrolls. 

The Food Chamber is coated with white enamel, thoroughly hard- 
ened and baked on in an oven of high temperature. 

All inside parts are removable for cleaning purposes. 

The drip pipe for the waste water has been carried outside the 
body, and does not run through the Food Chamber — as usual in other 
refrigerators. 

Made in three sizes, the largest with double doors. 

NOW is the time to get your Orders in 

for these goods and ensure 

prompt shipment. 

The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. 



Toronto 



LIMITED 
Montreal 



Winnipeg 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



^ jT M^ ^^j^^d^^^^t - ^R^^^ 



"f 



m. Mr. James A. Spilman, Rolla, Missouri, says : " I 
received the Rope-by-the-Foot Schedule Card some 
time ago and am using the plan regularly in our 
rope sales. 

"I find it a great help for so many customers 
ask for so much rope and want to know the cost in 
advance. The entire force appreciates and uses this 
plan." 

PLYMOUTH 
ROPE 

is especially adapted to this method 
of selling because of its uniformity. 
Your competitors selling other ropes 
could not use the Plymouth Plan 
without coming to grief. Some who 
have tried it have learned an expen- 
sive lesson. You lessen competition 
by selling rope on a basis that your 
customer comprehends. 

CThe F. T. Bliss Hardware Company, South Man 
Chester, Conn., say: "We note in comparing the 
freight and prices by the foot that there is an 
advantage to us in selling on your plan and we 
anticipate that we are going to profit and like 
it better than selling rope by the pound." 



^ Plymouth Cordage^^^. 
^ J Company t^^// 

i/isa^a^ No. Plymouth, Mass. VcjjS^e^ 
*ǣ^ Welland, Can. '&iȣ^ 

INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Ltd. 

Canadian Sales Agents, TORONTO, CAN. 







....'^i«. 









// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



HARDWARE AND ^lETAL 



July 20, 1918 




They are as durable 
as the high-grade steel 
that composes them, and 
will render faithful service 
for generations. The comfort- 
able handle and various lengths of 
blades make them suitable for all classes 
of work. 

Your Jobber Can Supply 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



OFFICIAL 

AWAR D 
RIBBON 



TRIMO TOOLS 




PANAMA PACIFIC 

INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITIOH " 
SAN FRANCISCO 

1915: 



PReSIDENTOFTHE SUPERIOR JURY 



..4>jU^ -6. /3aMt,^ 



DIRECTOROF EXHIBITS 

SECrV Of THE1NT£RNATI0NAL 
AWARD SYSTEM 

MEDAL 



DEPARTMENT OF 

MANUFACTURESAMD 
VARIED INDUSTRIES 




Nut with Nut Guards 

BE sure to ask for the 
Trimo Wrenches, 
both Pipe and Monkey. 
They are equipped with 
Nut Guards that pre- 
vent the accidental turn- 
ing of the adjusting nut 
in close quarters, and 
with Steel Frames in the 
principal size that will 
not break. 

SEND FOR CATALOG 
NO. 55. 

T RI MONT 
MFG. CO. 

55-71 Amory Street 
Roxbury, Mass. 
U.S.A. 



TRIMO PIPE WBENOH 




WITH FLAT-I-INK OB CABLK CHAIN 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 







r"- 



'irS 



r< 



\s^ 



The Needs of the Empire 



NEVER BEFORE in the history of Canada has greater 
opportunity been offered her Sons and Daughters to 
render SERVICE to the Empire; — and 

NEVER BEFORE have the needs of the Empire 
demanded as high a standard of QUALITY in thought, 
deed and product as at present. 

HOW NOBLY CANADA has responded is now known 
around the World and history will record it for the future. 

THE PRODUCTS OF OUR MILLS are at the Fronts 
and on the Seas, in the Shipyards and Factories and in 
the Fields, faithfully fulfilling their mission of reliable 
performance wherever the Government's War- Winning 
Programme directs, as we are, and have been, stripped for 
action since the first call to arms. 

THE NEEDS OF THE EMPIRE are many and the 
War-Wmning Programme changes as necessity demands; 
but it matters not, the needs of the Empire are paramount 
and must be supplied. 

THEREFORE, if in these trymg times, we do not deliver 
promptly to you such of the products of our Mills or 
Blast Furnaces as you may need, console yourself with 
the thought that through us, you are rendering Service 
to the Empire and to the Cause that matters most for 
the Liberty, Justice and Freedom of the World. 

THE 

STEEL COMPANY 

OF 

CANADA 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON MONTREAL 




t.--i. 



k-j, 



tm^v 



ii I 



^:^. 



h 



r 



lr> 



iP 







If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



K 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 





Stanley Nail Sets and 
Centre Punches 

"STANLEY" Nail Sets and Center Punches 
are made of a special grade of tool steel. 
They are hardened on both ends by an im- 
proved process, given an oil temper and will 
be found to "stand up" under the most severe 
conditions. 

Special care has been taken in selecting the 
proper knurling for the shank, and the user 
will find that the feeling of security as to 
"grip" is a particular feature of "STANLEY" 
Nail Sets and Center Punches. 

The neat and handy boxes in which they 
are packed make them an attractive article 
for counter display. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

StanleyRule 8c Level Ca. 

New Britain, Conn. U.S.A. 




Are You Selling the 

Taylor-Forbes Post Hole Auger? 



Like the other Taylor- 
Forbes hardware lines 
it is made to give the 
customer satisfactory 
results and long ser- 
vice. 

Every hardw^are 
dealer should show it. 
Made in sizes varying 
from 4 inches to 10 
inches, japanned and 
packed in bundles of 
% dozen. 



Dealers can always recommend Taylor- 
Forbes Hardware. We are the largest 
manufacturers of hardware in Canada. 

Our lines are always made up to a stand- 
ard beyond which there is no other. 




The T. F. Hydrant Keys 
TAYLOR. FORBES CO., LIMITED 

Head Office and Works: GUELPH, ONT. 



// any advertisemfint interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



Sci'ew Plates 



Eveiy Gma^e 
needs a Set of 

Little Giant 

Taps ^w Dies 















•j-i^jj{^\ 




..J.L 



i/ 



L^^i^t. 



,;•// 




Little Giant Combination Screw 
Plates are a very important part of 
the working equipment of every 
up-to-date garage. 

They contain taps and dies for cut- 
ting practically all sizes of screw 
threads found in automobile, truck 
or tractor construction, and besides 
the regulation stock and tap 
wrench, many of them contain a 
Bit Brace Die Holder which is very 
useful in threading out-of-the-way 
parts without removing them from 
the car. 

Little Giant Screw Plates are made 
and backed by the largest tap and die 
manufacturers in the world. 

Have you the latest Little Giant Cata- 
log and Discount? 

Wells Brothers Co. 
of Canada, Ltd. 

Gait, Ontario 

Sales Agents: Canadian Fairbanks-Morse 
Company, Limited 

Canadian Factory : Greenfield Tap and Die 
Corporation 



■»s 



m^rr: 




If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



12 



HARD AV ARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 



GET THE 
REPUTATION 

for selling "standard-grade" tools, 
and you'll get the trade of every 
good mechanic in your locality. 



The "standard grade" for files is 
the 

"FAMOUS FIVE" 

Specify them when ordering from 
your jobber. 

They are : 





WHY NOT BE GUIDED 
BY THE JUDGMENT OF 
HUNDREDS OF WELL 
KNOWN LUMBERMEN. 
WHO ACKNOWLEDGE 
THE SUPERIORITY OF 

"SAGER AXES" 

AND 

"SOO LINE" 
LOGGING 

TOOLS? 

GET THE HABIT. 

(AND THE PROFIT) 

Canadian Warren 
Axe & Tool Co. 

LIMITED 
ST. CATHARINES. ONT. 




Soo Line 
Logging Tools 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



ISHINGLES SIDING CEILING CO RR U GATE D I RON TROUGH and p| PE, ETC. ETC, 



"Metallic never cracks or falls off 

In being put up it doesn't 
till the place with dirt, 
muss, fuss and dust like 
lath, plaster and wall- 
paper. And "Metallic" is 
easy to put up — it's clean, 
sanitary, washable, paintable 
and permanent. 

We help you land the business, 
Write to-day for catalogue and full 
information 

Stock carried by 

GEO. W. REED & CO., LTD. 

37 St. Antoine Street Montreal 




DesigTi Registered 1916 






;<ea!ea«y.<mwMiBi.<?M<i^^jaiaK^^ 



Im^'n'I:! : FV?iSC-?r U :R"E-^^ 



Have You Read '*7 Pumps That 
Take the Place of 700' 7 

Have you the idea that handling pumps is still an intricate 
and "fussy" business? Do you shy at the thought of pumps 
because of the huge stock you would be forced to carry? 
Are you passing up a good source of profit because you're 
afraid it would tie up too much space and money? 

If you feel that way about pumps, send for a copy 
of "7 Pumps that take the Place of 700." Read it 
carefully and you'll get a new idea of the pump busi- 
ness. You'll realize that you're losing good money 
every day you are without BT Pumps. You'll under- 
stand how you can satisfy any demand without 
going to the trouble and expense of putting in 
a big stock. And you'll know why BT Pumps 
are so near perfect. 

Send for a copy of this book to-day and read it 
all through. 



Beatty Bros., Limited 

Fergus, Ontario 
St. John, N.B. Montreal Winnipeg Edmonton 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 191S 



^Jhe World -Famous 

WILKINSON 

Sword - Steel Razor 

— The envy of every 
man who loves aa 
easy shave. 





Made from our Special Steel. 

and Ground, Hardened 

and Tempered by 

Special Process. 



The$e Razor* 
are Fu I ly 
Guaranteed. 



Anticipate 

the "After-the-War" 
rush by placing Orders 

NOW 



THE output of our 
famous WILKINSON 
Silver Sword -Steel Razors 
has been largely restricted 
through war requirements. 
We feel the time has arrived 
when factors and retailers 
( should be placing their orders 
for "after -the -War" delivery, 
and we invite such orders, 
to be executed in strict 
rotation as received. Every 
effort made to meet sample 
orders from present limited 
output. 



WILKINSON 

SWORD 

CO., L™ 

53, Pall Mall, 

LONDON, 

S.W. 1. 

T. H. RANDOLPH, Managing Director. 



"Uhe PALL MALL 
7- Day Safety Shaver, 



in Best Leather Case. Extra 
Blades may be obtained for 
the "Pall Mall" Safety Razor. 
The blades are solid, there- 
fore most suitable for stiff 
beards and tender skins.^''. 




We are Makers of 

RAZORS, 
SHAVERS, 
SWORDS, 

GUNS, 
PISTOLS, 

CAMP 
EQUIPMENT, 
HUNTING 
KNIVES, etc. 



MiUM 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with .CUrs to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 




A Guide to 

Hack Saw Thrift 




If you want to secure the last 
ounce of work from hack saw 
blades, you must bring the 
right saw and the right job 
together. The 

Starrett Hack Saw Chart 

tells you instantly what 
number blade to use for any 
kind of metal or for any par- 
ticular shape. It tells you the 
saw which will do the work 
quickest and with the maxi- 
mum endurance — ^in fact, it 
is a real guide to Hack Saw 
Thrift. 

A Starrett Hack Saw Chart 3 will be sent 
free to any address. Ask it — It Knows. 




The L. S. Starrett Company 

THE WORLD'S GREATEST TOOLMAKERS 

"Manufacturers of Hack Saws Unexcelled 

ATHOL, MASSACHUSETTS 



NEW YORK 



LONDON 






CHICAGO 



N6.250 
STARRETT 



42-793 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



16 



HARDWARE AND METAJv 



July 20, 1918 






Butterfield's Tools Have Many Years' 
Reputation for Accuracy, Speed and Strength 

They come into your store every day — users 
of Butterfield Tools. 

The Butterfield reputation for serviceable 
Taps, Dies and Reamers has taken years to 
bviild up. 
^ It is at your disposal, however, in strength- 

ening sales by bringing customers to your 
store. 

Write for a copy of our catalogue. 



Butterfield & Company 

Inc. 

ROCK ISLAND, QUEBEC 

CANADA 




SMALL MACHINES 

Are Made for Service. They Combine 
Durability, Speed and Accuracy 




No Tinshop can afford to be without a set of these machines 
We manufacture a full line of Tinners' Tools 

Drop us a line for full particulars and prices 




The Brown-Boggs Co., Limited 

Hamilton, Canada 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 





et the Boys 



The quality of Dominion 22's has been demonstrated 
by their use by members of rifle clubs in Canada and by 
cadet teams that competed successfully abroad. 

22's that stand tests like these, where accuracy, posi- 
tive operation and penetration are not only necessary but 
essential, will go over your counter easily. 

Thousands of boys are shooting in Marksmen's Clubs 
throughout Canada. Every marksman is using 



D 



ominion 



22'i 



If you haven't a rifle club in your town let us help you 
develop one. It will mean new customers for you — the 
boys of to-day, who are the big buyers of to-morrow. 

Write for GUI' Handbook on Rifle Shooting and Club 
Organization. 

This, and a full stock of all Dominion 22's, will be a 
means to new ammunition profits to you. 



I 

I 



B. B. Caps 

C. B. Caps 
.22 Short 
.22 Long 

.22 Short Mushroom 

.22 Long Mushroom 

.22 Long Rifle 

.22 Extra Long 

,22 W. E F. (.Black 
Powder) 

.22 W.R.F. (Smoke- 
less) 

.22 Winchester Auto- 
matic. 



Dominion Cartridge 
Co., Limited 

120 St. James Street, 
Montreal 




18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 






\ 




FIVE WORKS-OVER 3,000 EMPLOYEES 

It is our intention after the 
War to devote our energies 
to the intensive production of 
the following Specialities : 

Ounmetal aad Brass Valves and Cocks. 

Steam, Water and Compressed Air Fittings 

generally. 
Cast Iron Stop and Sluice Valves. 
Semi-Rotary Pumps. 
Extruded Brass and Bronze Bars. 
Brass Bolts and Nuts, Studs and General Turned 

W^ork from the Bar 
Cast and Malleable Iron Cocks and Pipe Fittings. 
Pressure and Vacuum Gauges. 
Injectors, Engine Governors. 
Spraying Machinery. 
Coppersmiths* Work. 

"Stella" Brand Alloys, Manganese Copper, Sili- 
con Copper, Ferro Zinc, Phosphor Copper 
and Tin, etc. 

Business After the War 

If you are interested in any or all of the lines 
mentioned and are in a position to take a hand 
in the energetic distribution of the same, please 
communicate with us NOW to our Head Office 
at the address below . 

UMITED BRASSFOUNDERS 
and ENGINEERS, Limited 

EMPRESS FOUNDRY 

Cornbrook, Manchester, England 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



WixY^m Should Be A 
Michelin Dealer 



Michelin Advertising 
Produces Unusual Results 








iI(glSglLSf 



Michelin advertising produces extraordinary results 
because it does something which no other tire adver- 
tising undertakes or could accomplish, 

Michelin advertising not only tells about Michelin 
durability, but it actually points out unique features 
in the construction of Michelin Tires which even the 
most inexperienced motorist must recognize as lead- 
ing inevitably to greater mileage. 

Michelin advertising appears the year 
round. 



It reaches practically every motorist in 
the country — and above all, it is different 
and better. 




20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 19 JS 



THE BICYCLE YOU OUGHT TO SELL 



FOR FATHER 



H 
Y 

S 



FOR MOTHER 



HYS 




LOP 



FOR SISTER 



L 
O 
P 

Models for the whole family 

It will pay you to write us for our proposition. 



FOR BROTHER 



HYSLOP BROTHERS, LIMITED 

SHUTER AND VICTORIA STREETS, TORONTO, ONT. 





a 



Worm Drive Trucks 



99 



Anywhere 
Quickly! 



The solution of YOUR delivery problem lies in a LITTLE GIANT Model for 
your business. One, two, three and a half and five tons 

One- Year Guarantee backed by a Corporation with resources of $14,000,000. 



Little Giant Trucks are equipped with Duntley Gas Generator, permitting the use of 
Kerosene, Distillate or other low grade mixtures at a saving in fuel costs of full 50%. 



Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co., Limited 



for Territorial Agencies, write 

Montreal Office 



345 CRAIG STREET WEST 
MONTREAL 



BRANCH: 

107 Church St., Toronto 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 




ORIGINAL PRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 



BUTTS AND HINGES 



if- 






Complete line of Butts and Hinges of all sizes and styles. 

Highest grade of steel and first-class workmanship. 

Write for prices and particulars. 



PRODUCED AT 

THE JAMES SMART PLANT 



BROCKVILLE, ONT. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 




22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, I'Jlo 



TOOL 





STEEL 



FOR ALL PURPOSES 



Every Description of Rolled Iron and Steel 
r BARS,ISHAPES, PLATES, SHEETS, BOLTS, ETC. 



BAINES & PECKOVER 



Warehouses: 

98-116 Esplanade 



IRON AND STEEL MERCHANTS 

TORONTO 



Yards: 

Harbor District 

18-23 



The Dispute Settler 

Here is a scale that captures confidence the minute 
you show it. And confidence "sells goods." In a 
dispute over correct weights, for instance, the owner 
of a Renfrew can defend its accuracy against any 
other scale, no matter how elaborate. The Govern- 
ment Inspector's Certificate, accompanying every 
Renfrew, is indisputable evidence of accuracy in 
every weight from % oz. to 30 lbs. That is one 
reason why the Renfrew sells like everything, these 
days. The housewife is ferreting out every leak 
due to honest mistakes in weighing. Get the 

Renfrew 

HOUSEHOLD 
SCALE 

Capacity % oz. to 30 lbs. 
Government inspector's 
certificate with every 
Renfrew. 

Finished in black or all 
nickel plate styles. 
Write to-day for litera- 
ture and attractive sell- 
ing proposition to 

The Renfrew Machinery Co., Limited 

Head Office and Works, Renfrew, Ont. 

Eastern Branch; Sussex, N.B. 

Western Representatives : P. A. C. Mclntyre & Co., 1206 Mc- 

Arthur Bldg., Winnipeg, Man. ; Crandall Co., Ltd., Vancouver, 

B.C. 

Our Other Lines: "Renfrew" Cream Separators; 2,0(M)-lb. 

Farmers' Truck Scales, Tractors, Wood-Saws, Grain Grinders, etc. 




FAIRBANKS HALVES 




Renewable Disc Valves 

The only tool required is a wrench to 
remove the bonnet. The vise, hammer and 
cold chisel are all eliminated. Once sold 
always demanded by your trade. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 

"Canada's Departmental Houae for 
Mechanical Goods 

St, John, Quebec, Mcntreal. Ottawa, 
Toronto; Hamilton, Vrindsor, Winnipeg, 
Saskatoon, Calgary Vancouver. Victoria, 




^ 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



pXh 



TRADE MARK 



FILES 



HARD AS A DIAMOND 
AND 
STRAIGHT AS A STRING 

TWO BRANDS 

ONE QUALITY— THE BEST 

They Cut Faster and Wear Longer 



PORT HOPE FILE MFG. CO., 

LIMITED 

PORT HOPE - ONTARIO 

"Ask your jobber" 



\^?E«/4 



TRADE MARK 



P LEWES LIMITED 



The Famous Sawyer 
jEndless Thresher Belt 



N 



.'LmJ 



Every thresher- 
man knows the 
value and quality 
in a Sawrver 
Belt. He 
k n o v^f s 
they'll stand 
u p under 
hard usage, 
remain pli- 
a b 1 e and 
elastic in all 
wr e a t hers, 
are uniform 
i n weight, 
s t r e n g th 
and surface, 
and unaf- 
fected b y 
^ heat and 

cold. 

There is no 
gamble for the 
merchant in Saw- 
yer Belts. They 
always sell. 



WINNIPEG 




FIG. 141 

JENKINS BROS. 

Standard Pattern Iron 

Body Globe Valve 

Screwed with Yoke. 



For use under steam service there are no 
valves quite as satisfactory as 

JENKINS BROS. 
Globe and Angle Valves 

Fitted with Jenkins' No, 119 Discs 

The composition of the disc is very hard, but becomes 
tough and flexible in service when under steam pressure. 

It shows remarkable freedom from cracking and flak- 
ing and unrivalled durability in working steam pressures 
up to 150 pounds. 



Write for Catalogue No. 8. 



103 St. Rami St. JENKINS BROS., Limited Montreal 



24 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 15, 1918 





Collins' 
Patent 
Stove Pipe 

is Easiest 

Put Up and Strongest Pipe Sold 

A strong and serviceable stove pipe 
— easy to put together and easily 
sold. 

Fastened with two rivets. Holes are 
punched true. 

We'll ship the same day we receive your order. 

The Collins Mfg. Company 

LIMITED 
415 Symington Ave. - Toronto 



HARVEST GLOVES 
COTTON GLOVES 

Also a full line of Leather 
"Gloves and Mitts, Horse 
Blankets in stock for next 
season. 

Fall goods arriving every day. 

Order early and be certain of 
your fall and winter supply. 



Thos. Birkett & Son Co. 

LIMITED 

OTTAWA, ONTARIO 








American Self- 
Oiling Grinders 

Manufactured by 

American Grinder 
Mfg. Co. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Will find a ready 
sale in Canadian 
hardware stores. 
Anyone who has 
tools to sharpen will 
readily recognize the 
superior features of 
these grinders. Let 
us recommend your 
> displaying them in 
your windows and 
stores. 



Leading jobbers cata- 
logue and sell them. 



Agents for Canada : 
Merchants Hardware Specialties Co., Calgary, Alta. ; D. Philip, 
138 Portage Ave. East, Winnipeg, Man. ; John H. Graham & Co., 
113 Chambers Street, New York City. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear__it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



Most Durable and Longest Lived 
Gas Water Heater Made — 
And Quickest to Instal 

The Morrison Stack Gas Water Heater, in addition 
to being the most durable and longest-lived copper 
coil Gas Water Heater made — is the easiest and 
quickest to instal. 

The small extra cost of the Stack is quickly covered 
by the saving afforded. 

It makes hot water in one minute. 

James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited 

93-97 ADELAIDE STREET WEST, TORONTO 




\ stackYeaterI 





Canadian Rivet Forges are 
built to last. 

Easy running blower, power- 
ful, uniform blast, rigid steel 
plate construction. 

Write for Catalog 100-19. 

Canadian Blower & Forge Co. 

Kitchener, Ont. 



// any advertisement interests you. 



nil. 
tear it 









STOVER 
HARDWARE 

This popular hardware is salable 
during all seasons of the year. Many 
items are suitable for 10 to 25c 
counters. The quality is the best 
and will make your stock more 
attractive to the trade. 

Send for our new catalog, P-17. 
Some of the articles it shows are: 



Mop sticks 
Fireplace fixtures 
Latches 

Ice Picks & Shaves 
Chest Handles 
Saw Vises 
Cast Hatchets 
Lemon Squeezers 
House Numbers 



Stove Trimmings 
Pulleys (all kinds) 
Coat & Harness 

Hooks 
Hinges 

Lamp Brackets 
Waffle Irons 
Door Pulls 
Nut Crackers 



WE ALSO MAKE 
Wind MilU, Feed Mills. Ensilage Cutters 
and Gasoline Engines. 



STOVER MFG. & ENGINE CO •^ 



^<?>' 



Freeport, lU. 

Canadian Agrents: 

Duncan & Cadman, 
618 Mclntyre Block, 
Winnipeg. 



V^V 



^^4.^> 



G. L. Cohoon, 
St. Sacrament 
Montreal. 



11 
St., 



/- ^'^^ 



>-c° 






.^°^ 









.^-' ^><^ 



out now and place with letters to be answered. 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 





Are You Ever Asked 
For Something in Metals 
Not Included in Your Stock ? 

[f you must answer the above question in the 
affirmative, remember that Hoyt's not only turn 
out huge quantities of the best babbitts you can 
buy, but that also they make bar and wire solder, 
sheet lead, came lead and all manner of spe- 
cialties. 

If ever you are asked for a lead 
specialty, or something out of the 
ordinary in mixed metals, write at 
once to 

HOYT METAL CO., Toronto 



nEW YORK, N.Y. 



LONDON, ENG. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



'o' 



o? 



<r- 



'"/o/v/ 



. • 



='^^, 



^■^■^?z- 



^-^^ 



L'C 



ILII' 



WENT\l/ORTH I 
ELL Worth i 

LAWN SPRINKLER-CIRCLE TYPE | 




j-^ 



S The most popular type of sprinkler, especially for large lawns ^ 

= and gardens. , , , ^ 

= Throws a misty spray covering a large area— stands level ^ 

S on ground. t ij? • u '% 

^ Made of brass, 8 inches in diameter, connections for halt inch, ^ 

s % and % hose. ^ 

s Order from your jobber or direct. = 

I Wentworth Mfg. Co., Limited | 

S Hamilton, Canada s 



Wrought and Steel Pljl^ 

WASHEBa 




of all descriptions 




Round & Square 
Plain or 
Galvanized 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





China Wood Oil Tinplates 
Lithopone Spelter 

Blue Vitriol Borax 

Glycerine, Etc. 

We have the above in stock and 
can make immediate shipments. 

B.& S.H.THOMPSON 

a COMPANY LIMITED 
MONTREAL 

SraneiMK TORONTO WINNIPEG NEW GLA3GOW, N.S. 

C«aadian Sal«« Atentc: United States Steel Products CempMir 
Ex»orter« for American Sheet & Tin Plate Companr 



^dni Flush 



For 

Cleaning 

Closet BoiNb 

Only 







Keep Sani-Flush 
before the eyes of 
your customers. 
Many of them have 
been convinced by 
the manufacturer's 
advertising that 
they need 



SanirFlush 

They will buy it as soon as you let 
them know you handle it. 



Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Limited 

10-12 McCaul Street, Toronto. Ont. 



E. Roy, 
65M St. Andre St.. Montreal, Que. 



C. C. Cartwrieht, 

85 Water St.. Winnipeg, Man. 




t 



MADE 
IN 



CANADA 




4 



Good Reasons 

—READ 'EMI 



Why you should sell Rolled Thread Bolts and 
Screws : 



BETTER QUAiLITY— Rolled Thread Bolt* ean 
only be nude from first auality Basic Open- 
Hearth Stock. 

STRONGER— Actual tests show 13 per eent. 
greater strength than Out Thread Bolts. 



THE NORTHERN BOLT, SCREW AND WIRE COMPANY, LIMITED 



NO USELESS WBIGHT-^kufcs an 

than threads. No useless weight to pay freigfat 
on. 

BIG FIRMa ADOPTING THEM— Some of the 
largest users on the continent will accept BOth- 
ing else— and they always investigate befoie 
acting. 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 




Mendets Will Solve the 
High Cost of Kitchen Utensils 

Dealers! Get busy! Take advantage of present high cost of 
iron, tin, granite and aluminum ware. 

Mendets are popular with every housewife right now, because 
they quickly and permanently repair kitchen ware and utensils 
at small cost. 

Put them on display. They sell themselves. 



CoUette Mfg. Company 

Collingwood, Ont., Canada 




28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 19iS 




This symbol, on any rubber product, is a warranty 
for quality and service. Behind it is an organization that 
has been manufacturing rubber goods for more than half 
a century. It is a guarantee that the product will stand up 
under the most trying conditions and that its service is 
easily the best to be had. 

The best way to prove our statement is to put our pro- 
ducts to the test. One of our service branches is within 
your reach. Get in touch with that branch and find out 
for yourself how well we can serve you and those you 
wish to serve. 

Everything in Rubber, 
"Made in Canada!* 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. 

Limited 

HEAD OFFICE - MONTREAL 

Branches at Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Kitchener, 
London, North Bay, Fort William, Winnipeg, Brandon, Regina, Saskatoon, Cal- 
gary, Lethbridge, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



:!9 



"Member Audit Bureau Circulations." 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

CANADA'S NATIONAL HARDWARE WEEKLY 

Vol. XXX. TORONTO JULY 20, 191 8 No. 29 

CONTENTS 

Save Coal By Using Electricity 31-32 

The Specialized Newspapers 32-33 

More Paint Should be Used and Sold 34-35 

Making Steneil« For Rapid Cardwriting 36-37 

Editorial Comment • 38-39 

Make the Chimney Draw Well • • 40 

Auto Accessory Window Display Contest 41 

ivent.s in the Trade 42-43 

New IlardAvare Goods 46 

The Clerks' Department — Just Average Ability — But Work and an Idea 47-48 

The Markets at a Glance 49 

Weekly Hardware Markets • • 49-55 

Weekly Paint Department — Get the Barns Painted 56 

Weekly Paint Markets 58-60 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President. 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager. 

Publishers of Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post. MacLean's Magazine. Farmers' Magazine. 
Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review, Men's Wear Review, Printer and Publisher, Bookseller and 
Stationer, Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News, The Power House. The Sanitary Engineer, 
Canadian Foundrynian, Marine Engineering of Canada. 

Cable Addresa : Macpubco, Toronto; Atabek, London, Eng. 

ESTABLISHED 188Y 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

GEO. D. DAVIS, Manager and Editor 
C. L. DUNN, Montreal Representative. G. S. WILLIAMSON, Associate Editor 

J. C. EDWARDS, Toronto Representative. .1. G. LUCAS, Associate Editor. 

E. A. HUMPHRIES, Ontario Representative. A. H. ILLSEY, Associate Editor. 

C. W. BYERS, Western Representative. H. L. SOUTHALL, Associate Editor. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 
CANADA— Montreal, Southam Bldg., 128 Bleury St. ; Phone Main 1004. Toronto, 143-153 University Avenue. ; 

Telephone Main 7324. Winnipeg, 1207 Union Trust Bldg. ; Telephone Main 3449. 
GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited. 88 Fleet Street, E.C., E. J. Dodd, 

Director : Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address : Atabek, London, England. 
UNITED STATES— New York, R. B. Huestis, Room 620, 111 Broadway; Telephone Rector 8971; Boston, C. L. 

Morton, Room 733, Old South Building, Telephone Main 1024; A. H. Byrne, Room 900, Lytton Bldg., 14 E. 

Jackson Street, Chicago. Phone Harrison 1147. 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, $3 a year; Great Britain, South Africa and West Indies, 12s. 6d. a year; 

United States, $3.50 a year; other countries, $4 a year; Single Copies, 10 cents. Invariably in advance. 



30 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 191' 



SHEET ZINC 

Best American brands 

We carry a large stock and 
are in a position t o make 
prompt shipment. 



Send us your enquiries. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., LIMITED 

560 St. Paul St. West, MONTREAL 



JOHN LYSAGHT 



LIMITED 

BRISTOL and NEWPORT 

Manufacturers of 
High- Grade 

Galvanized Sheets 
Black Steel Sheets 
Wire Netting, etc. 



A.C.LESLIE& CO., LIMITED 

560 St. Paul St. West, MONTREAL 

Managers for Canada 



THE 






ar 

Polish 



TRADE 
MARK 



\J OU and your customer are assured of service, satisfaction and value 
■1 when you stock and prominently display' 0-Cedar Products. 

The Manufacturers of 0-Cedar Products have so consistently followed the 
ideals of quality that their Trade-Mark is now invariably accepted as an assur- 
ance of standard quality, quantity contents and value. 

0-Cedar Products have exceptional merits. The extensive advertising of 
them widens the circle of their friends; but it is the ever-increasing repeat or- 
ders for these lines that most surely indicate their worth. 

Display O-Cedar Products where they can be easily seen; or, still better, display them in your 
window occasionally. We have some beautiful window cards and hangers which we will send 
on request. These form a strong "link up" with the other 0-Cedar advertising in newspapers, 
magazines and street cars. 

Ask your jobber's salesman about the 0-Cedar Special Assortments and 0-Cedar Profit Deals. 

CHANNELL CHEMICAL COMPANY, LIMITED 

369 SORAUREN AVE., TORONTO 



Canada's ^^ 



National 



Hard 



ware 



Weekly □£■ 



mRDwmE-^m/iL 



!□ Published 
Every 
Saturday 
Since 

1888 



DO 



Vol. 30 



TORONTO, JULY 20, 1918 



No. 29 



Save Coal By Using Electricity 

Only in Niagara District is There Shortage of Power at Present — All Other Systems 
Have Ample — Shortage Will Soon be Overcome in Ontario — Electrical 

Appliances For the Farm 




An Attractive Window Showing "Electrical Helps for Weekly Housework." 



THAT the cost of cooking by coal 
is very wasteful as compared with 
the cost of cooking by electricity 
is apparent from the fact that it is es- 
timated the average family of five con- 
sumes for cooking purposes about 800 
pounds of coal per month. To supply 
this family with ample cooking current 
requires 262 impounds of coal at the cen- 
tral station. In the one instance it re- 
quires 5 tons of coal per annum for the 
cooking arrangements of the average 
family: in the instance of electric cook- 
ing it requires only IVz tons of coal per 
annum — only one-third as much. 

Taken on the basis of 800,000 homes 
in Canada who use coal there would be 
an annual saving of 2,800,000 tons per 
annum in the difference between what 
it would cost to cook by electricity and 
the cost by coal. This is a saving that 
reaches an astounding figure. And the 
saving does not stop in the mere item 
of coal either. For there is a labor sav- 
ing and saving in the cost of transpor- 



tation and the number of freight cars and 
engines required to transport that a- 
mount of coal each year. To bring the 
coal from the mines in Pennsylvania 
and other points entails a haul of several 
hundred miles. The use of electricity 
for this purpose would do away with the 
hauling of thousands of coal cars hun- 
dreds of miles each year. 

Opportunity For Real Conservation 

And it should be remembered that this 
saving is only in the one item for cook- 
ing purposes alone. The Society of 
Electrical Development of the United 
States estimates there are 9,000,000 us- 
ers of coal for cooking purposes in that 
country. And these users require 90,- 
000,000 tons of coal per annum. The 
amount estimated as used in Canada is 
taken on the same basis, according to 
the difference in population. 

In Canada where there is an abunti- 
ance of water power there would be 
an even greater saving. With the trans- 



formation entirely to electrical heating 
and cooking there would be an enormous 
saving. This is a condition that is bound 
to come about. For the present methods 
of heating and cooking by coal are 
wasteful and inefficient. It is within 
the march of progress and events that 
all waste should be eliminated within 
the years immediately in the future. 
There has been such an enormous drain 
upon the nations of the world in this 
war that they will be compelled to econo- 
mize in every possible way in their in- 
dustrial life. 

This is being realized in Great Britain 
at the present time. In that country 
a commission on conservation was some 
time ago appointed to report on ways 
and means of husbanding the nation's 
resources. One of the recommendations 
that committee has made is that there 
shall be something like sixteen super- 
power stations located in various parts 
of the islands for the generation and 
distribution of electrical current. Coal 



32 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 



that is now used in tKe individual homes 
will be turned into power at the central 
stations and distributed to the users. 
The saving thus effected is estimated 
at 50,000,000 tons of coal per year. 

Electrical Development in Canada 

There are signs that Canada is not 
backward in her development along elec- 
trical lines. Increases in the power fa- 
cilities are being made as fast as pos- 
sible. Only recently at London, Ont., 
it was announced by Sir Adam Beck 
that orders-in-Council had been passed 
authorizing the development of 130,000 
horsepower at Lake Nepigon, providing 
for an increase in electrical equipment 
at Niagara Falls to the extent of $500,- 
000, and for the development of from 
25,000 to 30,000 horsepower at High 
Falls on the Rideau and on the St. Law- 
rence Rivers. 

Soon Be Plenty of Power 

There is a scarcity of power in the 
Niagara district at the present time, 
but it only applies to that one particu- 
lar district. This has been occasionea 
through the great use for electricity on 
munition work. There are several sys- 



tems in the province of Ontario besides 
the Niagara system, and all of the other 
systems with the exception of the Nia- 
gara have an abundance of power. For 
instance, the other systems comprise: 
The Severn system, Eugenia system, 
Wasdell's system, Muskoka system, St. 
Lawrence system, Ottawa system. Port 
Arthur system, Renfrew system. Central 
Ontario system and the Ontario Power 
Company. 

The chairman of the Hydro-Electric 
Commission stated that the province ol 
Ontario would be in a position to supply 
the United States with 200,000 horse- 
power by the Fall of 1919, increasing 
30,000 horsepower a month until a maxi- 
mum of 300,000 horsepower was reached. 
From this it will be seen that there 
will soon be an abundance of power 
available for every purpose. During the 
past two years the capacity of every 
system in Ontario has been doubled. 
It is the plan of the commission to have 
available within five years 2,250,000 
horsepower, which is equivalent to 50,- 
000,000 tons of coal. 

Power for the Farm 

And it is not alone in the city that 
this power is going to be available. 



Already it has been carried to manv of 
the farms of the Dominion and wi!l be 
carried to still a great many more. The 
lighting of the barn and the farm house 
• by electricity will soon be as essential 
as the use of the automobile. In each_ 
of the farm homes of this Dominion 
there is the possibility for the sale of 
electrical equipment and appliances. » 
Each farm will require its lighting sys- 
tem, its motor-driven churn, its motor- 
driven washing machine, motor-driven 
sewing machine, motor-driven separator, 
automatic milkers, electric ranges, elec- 
tric toasters, electrical fixtures, electric 
irons. The list of articles is indeed in- 
numerable. The hardware store is the 
logical place for the farmer to get the 
majority of these lines. The hardware- 
man should be prepared to take care of 
this trade when it is ready to come lo 
him. It has already started to come 
to him in considerable amount, but 
the business possibilities of these lines 
have as yet only been scratched. Eler- 
trical development is the trend of the 
future and those who take time bv the 
forelock and prepare for it now will be 
the ones who will benefit when the full 
surge of the business sets in. 



The Specialized Newspapers 

Why the Daily Press Does Not Publish the Important Information Bearing on Conduct 

of the War is Explained by Col. Maclean — The Business and Technical 

Newspapers Have Made Careful Study of Conditions 



IIEUT.-COL. John Bayne Maclean, 
president of the MacLean Publish- 
^ing Co., has been writing for MAC- 
LEAN'S MAGAZINE a strong series of 
articles on the war which have without 
doubt been creating more interest among 
Canadians than any other articles pub- 
lished. They give a clear insight into 
conditions under which we are working 
and go into a great many points un- 
touched by the daily newspapers. In 
the July issue of MACLEAN'S Col. 
Maclean, deals with the influence of the 
specialized business paper and explains 
why it is in position to give its readers 
definite, practical information that the 
daily press either has not access to or 
not the specialized writers to present 
it properly and intelligently. His article 
says: 

"The question has been asked many 
times how it is that the big daily news- 
papers have not had access to and thus 
have not published the long series of 
important and conclusive information 
bearing on the war and political prob- 
lems that have appeared in our columni. 
Do we know more than the dailies? Gen- 
erally, no; on many matters, yes. 

"The writers on the dailies are far 
better informed on a greater variety 
of current topics of general interest than 
we of the specialized press, but we have 
the advantage in our much more thor- 
ough knowledge of a number of particu- 
lar topics. 

"The dailies are the general prac- 
titioners of the newspaper profession. 



while the financial, business, technical, 
agricultural and other class newspapers 
are the specialists. In fact the smaller 
dailies and rural weeklies are to some 
extent specialized also, in that they de- 
vote the greater part of their space to 
local problems. Many weeklies now give 
no space to national topics excepting 
where they affect local conditions. One 
rural editor told me that when Queen 
Victoria died not a line appeared in his 
paper, but that week he devoted a col- 
umn obituary to an old resident in a 
back township. 

"Specialized newspapers are a develop- 
ment of the last half century, to fill a de- 
mand for more complete news on certain 
important topics than the daily papers 
can afford to procure or give space to. 
Many of the greatest class papers are 
little known outside of their own field; 
but there, if they are well edited, they 
are very powerful and have built up 
such a reputation as accurate, honest, 
fearless authorities that the good will 
of any one of half a dozen leaders is 
valued at more than the good will of 
combined dailies of Toronto. The Iro7i 
Age, for example, the weekly authority 
in the metal manufacturing industry, is 
valued to-day at over $3,000,000. 

"Some years ago the city of Toronto 
paid the editor of another class paper 
$10 000 for his advice on an engineering 
problem v;hich he prepared in his spar- 
time. You can estimate the value of hit 
regular weekly services to the perma- 
nent readers of his paper. Notwithstand- 



ing this there are some newspaper edi- 
tors in Toronto who are still so far be- 
hind progress that they want such papers 
suppressed that they may have a mono- 
poly of news selling. The manipulation 
of the Associated Press in the interests 
of inefficiency shows what would happen 
if they had their way. 

"Many of the specialists on the class 
papers are recruited from the best writ- 
ers on the daily press, and there may be 
several of them, highly paid, studying, 
investigating, travelling at great expense 
in the interest of papers that have not 
more than 2,000 to 3,000 subscribers. 
But these subscribers may be the mott 
important men in the country, having 
invested in that particular field tens of 
millions in money and employing or de- 
pending upon them hundreds of thou- 
sands of Canadians; and who depend, for 
their most important news, upon these 
specialized newspapers. 

"There is another great difference be 
tween the work and training of the gen- 
eral and the specialized writer. The chief 
aim of the former is to seek out the cur- 
rent, novel and sensational, and to writo 
and to display it in the way best calcu- 
lated to attract attention and promote 
the street or newstand sales of his paper. 
He must be most careful to please his 
readers by expressing no opinions or by- 
appealing to their prejudices. Otherwise 
they will buy a competitor's paper next 
day. There are, of course, some out- 
standing exceptions where a paper is so 
much stronger than others in its fiel't 



JaTiy 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



that it can afford to be, and is, indepen- 
dent. 

"The specialists must not only follow 
their own particular lines and keep in 
touch with all the topics handled by the 
general writers as they affect their 
readers, but must dig deeper down. 
The general writer's work is done when 
he records happenings, sometimes inac- 
curately and unfairly for lack of time. 
The writers in the business papers must 
also study the immediate and future 
effects on the investors and men and 
women employed in his particular indus- 
try and indirectly on the whole country. 

"Again, the general writers cover 
primarily the official world, and the 
chance occurrences that originate there, 
from the police and fire halls, courlci, 
municipal buildings, small ward politi- 
cians, public meetings, conventions and 
on up to the departmental officials and 
professional politicians and wire pullers 
at the provincial and national capitals. 
We do not pay as generously as we 
should, and there is no doubt we have 
many able men in our public service 
and life who could earn more elsewhere, 
but who are enthusiastically ana con- 
scientiously devoted to their work. But 
a great many are mediocre in ability 
and regard their jobs as the Iifo pensions 
for party services. Yet these are the men 
Mho, to a great extent, inform or mis- 
inform, and insnire the general writers, 
the Associated Press and special corre- 
spondents. 

"The special writers come in contact 
with verv few of this class. They have to 
handle the big problems, and their in- 
formation must come from the highest 
sources. Their daily life is spent among 
the leaders in finance, industry, busi- 
ness, agriculture and labor. If it is a 
question affecting business they must see 
the Cabinet Minister in whose depart- 
ment it is, or the Prime Minister him- 
self. And usually he is just as anxious 
to see the specialist as the latter is to 
see him. for often he knows more abjut 
the matter and the effect it may have 
than does the Minister. If it is a big 
railroad problem the presidents must al- 
ways be seen. An important financial 
mitter calls for an interview with the 
ablest bankers or other snecialists. All 
for information, not inspiration or ad- 
vice. The class newspaper specialists 
must see other sides to a question and 
act on what is in the best interests of 
all — the 2-en^ral public as well. Also 
thev must be accur->te whether it pleases 
their readers or not. 

"In the evidence which c^me out in 
the correspondence seized hv the Gov- 
ernment in the orocerv and in the metal 
tr^d?s combines inve3ti"-ations Fome 
years ago manv letters -—er-e made pub^ic 
.showing the strenuous, but unsuccessful, 
pfforfs that h^d been mide bv isome of 
the bi"- men in t>'ese nowerfnl or^fniza- 
ti^ns ^■'i secure tho sumort of Th^^ Cana- 
dian Grocer and Hardware and Metal to 
policies that we, with our broader out- 
look, saw would rebound, as they did 
rebound, upon the promoters. Two of the 
men who were defendants in these cases 
were big enough to tell me since that we 
were right. It is interesting to note now 
that for years I was accused of being in 



league with these combines. The publi- 
cation of some of the, seized correspond- 
ence and minutes showed that while our 
relations were friendly I had refused 
right along to be their organ. Our policy 
lost us many thousands of income in ad- 
vertising, but became an asset in the in- 
creased confidence of our subscribers. 

"What I have written is in explanation, 
not condemnation, of a condition and a 
system the world over. In proportion to 
population no country is more honestly 
or better served by its big dailies than is 
Canada. But they are liable to be mis- 
led by men seeking to gratify their ovvn 
envies or prejudices. The Canadian Asso- 
ciated Press as it exists to-day originated 
in my own office — see records Canadian 
Press Association — at a time when Brit- 
ish news came to us through New York, 
where it was sometimes doctored to meet 
the prejudices of certain U. S. readers to 
such an extent that it was developing a 
misunderstanding of the motherland m 
Canada. 

"But the C. A. P. can even now be un- 
fairly manipulated. When Colonel Bruce 
and his committee of Canadian officers 
on Sir Sam Hughes' instructions investi- 
gated our medical organization he uncov- 
ered fearful conditions due to ineffici- 
ency, favoritism, neglect, under which 
our men suffered and millions of Cana- 
dian money, was wasted. Sir Sam's ene- 
mies and the men responsible for this 
state of affairs brought influence to bear, 
and an Imperial officer. Sir William Bab- 
tie, was requested to pass on the Bruce 
report, which he did in very unfavorable 
terms. Influential in the Associated 
Press were certain Canadian newspapers 
which were fanatical in their dislike of 
Hughes, and the Babtie report was play- 
ed up right across Canada. Then a pe- 
culiar thing happened. The report of 
the committee investigating the Mesopo- 
tamia affair showed that Babtie was the 
man chiefly responsible for the medical 
arrangements that will go down as one 
of the most disgraceful occurrences in 
our military history. Yet the Canadian 
Associated Press in dealing with this 
gave all the other names, but carefully 
omitted any reference to Babtie and the 
severe exposure of his incompetence. Not 
a word of this got out in Canada until 
we publiished the real facts in The Fin- 
ayicial Post, taken from the original re- 
ports in our own office. The London pa- 
pers of that date were then referred to 
and it was found that none of them sup- 
pressed Babtie's name, which suggested 
conclusively that certain interests behind 
the C. A. P. had intentionally omitted 
it. It is needless to say that such tactics 
created intense indignation among the 
more reputable dailies. It was brought 
up at a meeting of the C. A. P. but 
certain Toronto interests have so far 
succeeded in side-tracking a free discus- 
sion. 

"The specialist in journalism leads a 
strenuous life. He is constantly in con- 
flict with rival interests and he must ever 
be on the alert to avoid being misled. The 
only advice I got from my chief, when I 
began to specialize on finance and busi- 
ness, was: "All men are liars when their 
pockets are affected; verify everything." 
I have not found them so. I have seldom 



been misled by a big man. But small men 
hedge or are untruthful. 

"The problems and information I have 
been dealing with in these columns 
may be new to the general writers on 
the daily press, but they have been more 
or less part of rriy daily life for well over 
thirty years. We have had to follow 
them for their immediate and future ef- 
fect upon the business interests of the 
country. And I have had the additional 
advantage of twenty-eight years' con- 
tinuous service in the Canadian militia, 
nearly all of it as an Adjutant or Com- 
manding Officer. Add to it the control 
for many years of the Canadian Mili- 
tary Gazette, in our long fight for the 
Army against Headquarters inefficiency 
and political interference. Finally a 
short experience attached to an Imper- 
ial Cavalry Brigade, with Gen. French 
in command and Haig as one of his 
staff, gave me an insight into British 
iirmy conditions as they are; and an in- 
creased admiration and respect for the 
splendid capacity of our military lead- 
ers, if given the support and opportunity 
our damnable politicians refused them. 

"International affairs have not hither- 
to come within the sphere of Canadian 
writers, and I have had perhaps a lilt'e 
more experience than the average Cana- 
dian journalist. My best friends m 
Europe for many years were two Tory 
journalists, J. M. Maclean, M.P., a rela- 
tive of the former Canadian Chief Jus- 
tice, born in the West Indies, educated 
in England, lived many years in India; 
and Lord Glenesk, owner of the Morning 
Post. The big political problems of Em- 
pire were their constant topic of conver- 
sation and correspondence. They feared 
the present international developments. 
Premier Salisbury's inactivities and his 
and Balfour's surrenders to Germany and 
Russia in the East worried them. Lord 
Glenesk conisidered the Asquith Ministj>' 
a positive danger to the Empire. Writing 
me shortly before his death he said: "I 
am sure that your active intelligence 
and powers will be steadily worked at 
this crisis when the doings of our new 
ministry are tending to imperil so much 
of what you and I hold precious." He 
clearly saw where such a group of in- 
competents were leading the Empire. 

"I would have been very useless, in- 
deed, if, with all these experiences I 
had not gained a fair knowledge of ac- 
tual conditions and come into most cor- 
dial and confidential relations with a 
number of the truly great British sol- 
diers and sailors who have been doing 
some of the big work in this war. Some 
of them have not hesitated to write me 
frankly and fearlessly in endorsation of 
the policy I have been following. 

"Anyone with common-sense can see 
there is no miracle in obtaining the in- 
formation I have published, or in plead- 
ing for the changes absolutely necessary 
to help our army and navy to win the 
war. I am merely reflecting the views 
of our great men who are on the spot 
and know what they are talking or writ- 
ing about. They demanded first "Piti- 
less Publicity," knowing that it will lead 
to reform and efficiency. One of the 
(Continued on page 48.) 



34 



July 20, 19;?,, 1 



More Paint Should Be Used and Sold 

Charley Wright, of the Acme Hardware, Gives Jim Rogers Detailed Suggestions For 

the Financing and Administration of a "More Paint" Campaign — He 

Criticises Present-day Methods of Advertising and Its Distribution 



IT is out of all records when Jim Rogers had ever sat 
as long in any one place, and allowed any one man 
to monopolize the long end of a discussion as com- 
pletely as he had permitted the proprietor of the Acme 
Hardware Co. to do in presenting his views concerning 
the paint trade and the possibilities for its extension in 
Canada with his "more paint" idea. 

It wasn't from lack of interest in the subject. It was 
downright, unmitigated concern in these new viewpoints 
that kept him glued to his chair and his attention fixed 
on Charley Wright's proposed extension of co-operation 
in the trade. There appeared no incongruity in the minds 
of either this retail buyer or the travelling representative 
of the manufacturer of paints and varnishes that such a 
scheme should be hatched over a plain oak desk in the 
two by twice office of an average town merchant. Charley 
Wright had selected bold facts as the basis for his argu- 
ment, he spoke from the accumulated depths of everyday 
experience in presenting his reasons for changes and co- 
operation. Yet how often had weightier men directly 
responsible in a larger measure for the distribution of 
paints and varnishes discussed hitherto unco-ordinated 
fragments of this question in upholstered luxury around 
the directors' mahogany and without approaching a solu- 
tion as comprehensive as Wright was propounding. 

The evening dusk gradually extended the length and 
density of the shadows in the Acme office, but it in no 
way dampened the ardor of either Wright or Rogers who 
were all unconscious of time as their conversation waxed 
in interest from one point to another on the subject 
of more paint! 

A lull brought about by Rogers' persistent devotion 
to his notebook drew Wright's attention to the deepening 
shadows. He reached up and turned on the tungsten. 

Rogers thinking that possibly this might be a hint 
for adjournment remarked, "Your wife's welcome home 
will feel as though it had come from the ice-box if I 
keep you here much longer, Charley, a cold shoulder 
and a cold supper for yours to-night." 

"I'll fix that up over the phone," answered Wright. 
"Since we're both warmed up to the subject I'd rather 
take a cold snack than leave a half-baked argument." 

"Same here," rejoined Rogers, "give me that phone 
and I'll fix it with the International for a dinner when 
we're through, there ought to be something on me after 
all this talk, even if it's only a meal." 

Committee Ready For Action 

"Let me see," reflected Wright, "I guess it's about 
time we were getting down to details — and any discussion 
of details is never a one-man job, so we'll have to ring 
in that committee representative of all branches interested 
in the trade. Under the limited circumstances you and 
I'll have to constitute a quorum to thresh it out." 

"Motion before the house is moved and carried," ap- 
plauded Rogers, "anything to boost this thing along. 
Committee is now ready for action. You're chairman, 
I'm secretary. We'll find a treasurer easy enough when 
we've raised the cash for this enterprise." 

Anyone to whom an advertising appropriation has been 
doled out grudgingly or otherwise and who has followed 
the conversation between Charley Wright and Jim Rogers 
will readily agree that they were ranidlv approaching 
the Gordian knot of their more paint project in any attempt 
to budget through the necessary financial backing. 

Rogers had learned, from scraps of conversation with 
the advertising manager of his house, that extracting the 
where-with-all from the big boss for any new advertising 
venture was the direct antithesis of taking candy from 
the baby. 

"As you said awhile back, Charley, the chap that can 
devise ways and means of separating sufficient coin from 
all the branches of the trade to put this scheme over 



will certainly have to take a bull-dog grip on the hip- 
pocket end of the trade and pull for grim death." 

How to Get the Cash 

"It all depends on how you put it up to them," coun- 
tered Wright. "If you approach them for contributions, 
subscriptions or anything of that sort with an air of 
'come across, old chap, it's for the general good of the 
cause,' you're pretty sure to meet with a 'Oh, yes, put 
me down for a ten-spot, now beat it; I'm busy' response. 
The low per capita consumption of paints and varnishes 
in Canada points to excellent returns on a sound invest- 
ment in this propaganda. My idea would be to approach 
each one just as confidently as if you were selling Victory 
Bonds or C.P.R. stock. The financing of this more paint 
scheme will stand far better chances for survival if we 
call it an investment and treat and administer it as such." 

"I agree with you there," responded Rogers, "but 1 
happen to know that individual advertising investments 
have never been unduly thrust upon their respective 
managers; unlike mushrooms, they don't spring up just 
anywhere overnight. The most important question before 
the house seems to me to be how are we going to collect 
from the variety of interests that ought to be in on this 
scheme?" 

Wright's hesitation signified a measure of apprehension 
of the difficulties in this direction as well, although he 
approached the question without dismay. "We mustn't 
lose sight of the fact that this whole scheme is to be co- 
operative, the carrying out of the details must be ad- 
ministered in the same fashion with constant attention 
to having the returns collective and co-operative. It will 
be also necessary to remember that like all individual 
advertising investments, the measure of the cloth will 
determine the size of the coat to be cut. However, we 
might look at it from the other end, too. Considering 
those figures stuck up in front of us last fall, we have 
pretty well sized up the subject to be fitted and could 
tailor away accordingly. In other words the amount to 
be invested should be determined by the size of the 
opportunity and task presented. Now this ought to 
keep our committee out of mischief and provide other 
diversion than auction pinochle or figuring up and com- 
paring our probable income tax. Each branch of the 
trade could have placed before it some idea of the possible 
returns and would be expected to invest accordingly." 

"Can you put your ideas down in figures, Charley?" 
pressed Rogers. 

"You want to get me on thin ice, don't you?" parried 
Wright. "However, here's where our pencil and paper 
will get some more action. In the first place let's divide 
up our collection of interests into little bits and go 
at it one piece at a time." 

"As chairman you do the dividing, Charley, and being 
secretary, I'll engineer the pencil and chart out the plot," 
volunteered Rogers. 

"Take them down in this order," began Wright; "manu- 
factui-ers of naints, varnishes and colors, manufacturers 
of linseed oil, pigments and other raw materials, can 
makers, master painters, makers of brushes and other 
supplies, jobbers and retailers." 

"Any sub-heads?" enquired Rogers. 

"No! I'll probably dive deen enough into this budget, 
stay under longer, and come up drier than any chancellor of 
the exchequer ever dreamed of, without using sub-heads 
for sinkers," laughed Wright. 

Manufacturer in the Press 

"Alright then, let's put the paint manufacturer in 
the cider-press and see how much juice you can extract," 
suggested Rogers with a twinkle in his eyes. 

"As I pointed out last fall if our more paint plan 
could induce Mr. and Mrs. Householder to make their 
annual paint up every three years, as it should be, it 
would come pretty close to netting Mr. Manufacturer 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



$15,000,000 annually instead of the present $3,000,000 he 
now realizes for the protection of our 1,600,000 homes." 

"That means $12,000,000 increase which you'll admit 
is some figure," added Rogers. 

"This world is forgetting to figure in anything else 
but millions and billions," continued Wright, "and taxes 
are jumping into their own accordingly so we'll assess 
our friend Manufacturer 1-5 of 1 per cent, on his expected 
returns." 

"That gives us $24,000 to start with," noted Rogers, 
jotting the sum on his pad, "that sounds simple enough 
but do you think they will cough up?" 

"Never know till you try," suggested Rogers, "if I 
could pour into the ear of old Colonel Cap. I. Tal the 
cold proven fact that $24,000 would return $12,000,000 or 
even half or quarter of that sum, I could lead him around 
by the lug wherever I chose." 

Raw Material Now in the Hopper 

"Alright, then, let's put Mr. Raw Material into the 
hopper and see how much you are going to separate 
from him," continued Rogers. 

"Naturally his returns will ratio with those of the 
manufacturer, altliough I'll have to rely on you for the 
figures this time, Jim. How much of this $12,000,000 
would be represented by raw materials in the products 
turned out?" 

"Offhand I'd say from 50 per cent, to 60 per cent.," 
replied Rogers. 

"How much of that is the can and package maker 
responsible for?" 

"Probably 10 per cent, to 12 per cent." 

"And say the linseed oil crusher?" 

"Probably 20 per cent, to 25 per cent.," ventured 
Rogers; "of course, Charley, this is only a rough estimate 
in dollars and cents value, no doubt the house could figure 
it out more closely if they wanted to." 

"Approximate estimates will serve our purpose for the 
present, Jim, it would be up to the permanent executive 
bureau to collect these figures more accurately from the 
different manufacturers. Now for argument's sake we'll 
hold the supply houses responsible for 60 per cent., or 
$7,200,000 of the manufacturer's increase and we'll tax 
them 1-10 of 1 per cent." 

"Another $7,200 to grind out 'more paint' education. 
This beats a tag-day for the Belgians to a frazzle," gloated 
Rogers. 

"Of course this would be divided up amongst them 
in proportion to the amounts that they supply." 

"By the way," interrupted Rogers, "you didn't suggest 
how vou were going to settle each manufacturer.'s share." 

"No, they'll have to settle that amongst themselves. 
I don't want to deny them the privilege of settling a 
certain amount of these details. While this scheme is 
a co-operative affair, I don't wish to attempt to extinguish 
any existing individual identity. There are several ways 
that they might do it — as for instance each manufacturer 
could contribute pro-rata on his invested capital — oi they 
might do so pro-rata on the gallonage each one produces. 
However, that's a matter they can decide amongst them- 
selves." 

Master Painter in the Scheme 

"Now then for the Master Painter," suggested Rogers 
with a good deal of curiosity in his eye and voice. "He's 
your next victim." 

"H'h," murmured Wright, "now then we have a real 
nut to crack. I happen to know that there are a good 
many of the more wide-awake master nainters that are 
quite well aware of the possibilities of a 'more paint' 
campaign. In fact, some of them are doing all in their 
power to promote efforts along this line. Their plight 
lies principally in their lack of organization and when 
you face that problem you go up asrainst a real hard 
stone wall. It is a great deal more difficult to allot any 
levy against unoreanized effort than it is to ask a thor- 
oughly organized branch of any trade to invest in such 
a proposition as ours." 

"You've said something now,*' affirmed Rogers, "but 
it strikes me that if this 'more paint' idea carries, it 
would afford the master painter an excellent opportunity 
to organize more thoroughly and to assume more of its 
responsibilitv as it goes along." 

"That's just exactly one of the things i wanted to 
bring out later on when I told you about Jake Sounders 



and his work on Bob Wagner's house," answered Wright. 
"Now perhaps we can use some of our figures to give 
the master painter an insight of what lies before him. 
Of course the biggest percentage of his returns will be 
in labor, and when you come to tax labor you can begin 
to look for a fuss with compound interest. His possi- 
bilities can be approached in two ways. We've estimated 
1,600,000 homes in Canada, which if each one is painted 
every three years, gives him 533,333 or thereabouts to 
work on annually. Now I don't suppose he'd undertake 
to paint these under an average of $50 apiece for labor 
alone." 

"Your estimate happens to be low, lower perhaps than 
mine was for paint materials for the average house," 
interrupted Rogers. 

Great in Labor Possibilities 

"We'll let it go at that," continued Wright, "but as 
low as that may be it would yield upwards of $26,500,000 
annually. That looks pretty big and it is big. If our 
'more paint' idea did nothing else than promote the oppor- 
tunity for that amount qf labor it certainly would accom- 
plish something. No single industry in Canada had a wage 
bill anywhere near that size in 1915. In fact there were 
only two or three groups of industries that anywhere 
approached it. The food industries paid a little over 
$22,000,000, textiles $27,000,000, iron and steel products 
$27,267,716, timber, lumber and re-manufactured products 
$28,964,555. These were amongst the largest wage bills 
paid. The trouble is our figures for the master painter 
at best are only estimates, and we have no known statis- 
tics under norn.al or existing conditions to make com- 
parisons with. There is another way of approaching 
an estimate of his returns also. Take into consideration 
the possibility of $15,000,000 for the manufacturer, and 
the usual estimate that about 75 per cent, of the cost 
of painting is ued in labor, this would give us a labor 
bill of $45,000,000 for paint application. Modify this by 
the fact that perhaps 50 per cent, of your manufacturer's 
goods would be used by the householder himself which 
would leave $7,500,000 used by the painter, with a con- 
sequent labor bill of $22,500,000. Even this is a pretty 
large sum to swallow, so to be on the safe side, let's take 
a whole lot of possible considerations into mind and 
shave our estimated labor returns down to a net of 
$15,000,000 in wages for our friend the master painter 
to handle." 

"Jumping Jehoshophat!" yelled Rogers, "you're nothing 
if you're not an optimist, Charley. The way you look 
off into starry space would make the horn-rimmed high- 
brow at the end of the Lick telescope look like a small 
boy viewing his first eclipse through a smoked window- 
pane." 

"I'm glad you've got that off your chest, Jim. This 
is a business meeting and not a cartoon exhibition," re- 
plied Wright, with some heat at Roger's levity. "I'll 
admit these estimates for the painter are pretty much 
guess work. It may appear grotesque to you, but what 
I'm trying to do is paint a picture in words and figures 
of what the future possibly has in store for him." 

"Alright, I'll stop throwing cold water on your ideas," 
hastened Rogers soberly. "I think the boss had men 
of your type in mind when he told a bunch of us one 
day that a man who would make suggestions for the 
firm was worth ten who sat mum and tight in their ruts, 
even if his suggestions were all wrong. How much 
revenue are you looking for from Mr. Master Painter?" 

"Put him down for 1-20 of 1 per cent.," said Wright 
decisively, "we might not get all of it but we'll put it 
up to him, anyway." 

"That's $7,500 more in grist for the mill," responded 
Rogers, putting the sum down in the estimates. "Now 
then for our other friends such as the brush manufacturer. 
Do you think he'll stand for a touch of this nature?" 

"Forget that word 'touch' " protested Wright; "as I 
pointed out to you we are considering the financing of 
this scheme as an investment and I'm taking this matter 
seriously as such. We have discussed this matter pro 
and con from a good m.any angles and I haven't any 
doubt that there have been a good many pro arguments 
and advantages in it that will hold out good sound finan- 
cial inducements to the brush manufacturers to come in 
as well. Let me point out a single instance. You've 
(Continued on page 44) 



36 



July 20, 1918 



Make Stencils for Rapid Cardwriting 

Midsummer is a Month of Sales in Order to Stimulate Business — Show Cards Will 
Help Move Goods — Colored Cards Have Drawing Power — 

Cardwriting Made Easy 



By Robt. T. D. Edwards 



JULY or midsummer is universally re- 
cognized as the season for saleii. 
This has come about on account of it 
being a quiet time of the year for the 
retail store, and in order to stimulate 
business sales of regular stock or spe- 
cially bought goods are put on. So with 
the knowledge that these sales must have 
some special display cards it behooves 
the cardwriter to make his plans now. 

This month's lesson is especially deal- 
ing with quick work, both in letter for- 
mation and in method of doing it. There 
are two things we must recognize as be- 
ing most important for sale cards. They 
are speed and effect. First, we musL 
select an alphabet which can be formed 
quickly with as few strokes as possible, 
and on the other hand, the cards must be 
effective and hit the customer as bein-^ 
something out of the ordinary. 

The alphabets we are showing in the 
chart are very speedy and yet readable, 
and can be worked up with two color 
combination on show cards, with good 
effects. 

Both these alphabets are entirely brush 
stroke throughout, the first being of 
Egyptian formation and the second a 
knock-out type, which is much more 



Law n Mowerg 
Garden Hose 
Rakes Etc. 






speedy than the first. No finishing 
strokes are needed on this one. The latter 
type is especially adapted for rush sale 
work. For quick work this formation 
cannot be beaten. A 7 x 11 in. card with 
one line and a price can be made in a few 
seconds. 

For Better Class Shew Card 

While these two forms of lettering are 
especially adapted for sale purpose;., 
they can be used to good advantage on a 
better class of show card as well. If you 
work in a large store, it is well to adovL 
a uniform style of lettering throughout, 
and no better type could be selected tha t 
the one illustrated. There are no un- 
necessary strokes used. 

Speed in Cardwriting 

Juit to give an idea of how quickly the 
sl^nt type can be formed, four 5i/^ x 7 







cards, as shown in Fig. 2, were lettered 
at the rate of seven seconds each. This 
does not include ruling the border. Of 
course, this takes considerable practice, 
and would take the person, who only 
does a few cards a day considerably 
longer. 

Practice is the main thing. Practise each 
and every stroke many times, and the 
ones you have the most difficulty with you 
should practise most. Each stroke is 
numbered and should be made in its 
turn. Draw the brush from left to right 
and from top to bottom. 

Make sure that the brush is in good 
working order at all times. It should be 
kept flat-pointed with a good clean chisel 
edge, both in use and when put away. 
Always wash the brushes out thoroughly 
in clean water, making sure to remove all 
particles of color from around the fer- 
rule. This is one of the most important 
points in the care of the brush. If the 
color be allowed to rem.ain in the upper 
part of the hair, in time the hair will 
split and render the brush useless. Re- 
member good brushes cost money and 
should be taken care of as you would 
your watch. 

Life Needed in Sale Cards 

If the brushes are in the best of con- 




dition you will find that a finishing 
stroke is not necessary to make the ends 
of the strokes square. The straight edge 
of the brush skilfully handled will suffice. 

For sale purposes you need more life 
to the show cards than just white card 
with a black letter. Many various color 
combinations are worked out by the 
various stores. Some use a white card 
with a blue letter, or a white card with a 
green letter, both being good summer 
colors. Many use colored railroad card- 
boards, with colors of ink to correspond. 

A blue board with a white or black 
letter, or a combination of both, make a 
good card, or a green card with a black 
letter. There are many other combina- 
tions, especially for two-color work. The 
use of yellow and red cards, in our esti- 
mation, is just a little too warm for the 
hot weather and should be avoided. 

Of course, there are some cardwriters 
who do not have a great number of cards 
to make, and who can make all their lay- 
outs individually. But the majority have 
at frequent intervals to do many cards 
of the same lay-out, and it is to these 
that we make the following suggestion: 



Our Simal Line 



95t 



standard-Sized Cards 

Throughout your store you, of course, 
have standard-sized cards, and in all 
probability they are hVi, x 7, 7 x 11, 11 x 
14, etc. The lay-outs of these cards, with 
the possible exception of a few, are all 
very similar. For instance, you have 
price cards only — those with one line at 
the top and a price, also two lines at the 
top and a price; price at the top and one 
line underneath, and three lines without 
a price. These will invariably catch the 
majority of lay-outs, and they should be 
standardized^ — that is, they should be 
kept uniform, and to do. this successfully 
you require various lay-out patterns for 
the different sized cards to be used. 
These patterns can always be kept on 
file and ready, for instant US3. 

By this method you are always sure of 
getting the lines square on the card with- 
out the worry of using a "T" square, and 



Ouly 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



37 




the work can be done in a quarter of the 
time. 

Decide en Letter to be Used 

The first thing- to do is to decide on a 
standard-sized figure and letter to use. 
Then make the various lay-outs you re- 
quire. Mark them out in pencil first, 
making sure all lines are parallel with 
the top and bottom of the card. When 
this is done, cut out the spaces where the 
lettering is to be, as shown in Fig. 1. 

The stencil should be made of some 
stiff cardboard, which will wear well, and 
a sharp mat cutter's knife should be 
used to do the cutting. Have the stencii 
edges clean, not ragged. 

To do the ruling use a hard lead pencil 
and make the lines very faint, and they 
will not require erasing. A stilus is 
sometimes used to rule the cards. This 
makes a crease only, but should not be 
made too deep. A round stick of hard 
wood, such as a penholder with the re- 
verse end sharpened, makes a very satis- 
factory tool for creasing the cards. 

Your attentit)n is called to Fig. 1. Here 
stencil. This is the most popular lay- 




out in large stores. The first line can 
be used for description, the second for 
regular selling price, and the third for 
the reduced price. 

No. 4 shows a single price stencil. 

No. 5 shows a stencil that can be used 
for ruling a pencil border. The four 
points on the corner are left so as to 
get the pattern straight on the card. 

No. 6 shows a three-line stencil. This 
are six lay-outs which will give a fair 
idea of what a completed stencil looks 
like. The black inside sections are the 
spaces which have been removed. 

No. 1 shows a two-line and a price 
stencil. This can he reversed and have 
the two lines at the top, with the price 
spaced at the right-hand bottom. 

No. 2 shows a space at the top for the 
price and a line underneath for some 
wording or regular price. This stencil 
can also be reversed to put the single line 
at the top and can be used for various 
wordings. 

No. 3 shows a two-line and price 
lay-out is very often used for a descrip- 
tive card. There are many other lay- 
outs which could be shown, but these 
will give you an idea of how to carry out 
the stencil idea to your own lay-outs. 

The collection of cards shown here 
illustrates some of the various ways this 
quickly formed type can be used. These 
cards are not intended for masterpieces, 
but merely to show how readable a 
f|uicl:l7 made alphabet can be. 



Fin-^nce Corporation is organized and 
ready to do business, but a serious 
diflSculty has been encountered in 
dealing with the class of cases for 
which it seems to have been chiefly 
designed, which consists of corpora- 
tions in need of capital either foi 
refunding or expansion purposes. It 
had been assumed that bankers would 
provide the capital wanted in such m- 
stances, and then recoup themselves by 
borrowing upon their own notes through 
the War Finance Corporation, which, 
above its own capital of $.500,000,000, 
would obtain credit at the Federal Re- 
serve banks. But it develops, as migh*- 
have been foreseen, that bankers are 
unwilling to expand their liabilities in 
this manner. Commercial bankers wouid 
be • outside their proper field of opera- 
tions in lending them credit for the pur- 
pose of providing capital, and investment 
bankers would find the policy equally 
impracticable. Their business is not to 
carry investments, but to distribute 
them, and they need to have their capi- 
tal in hand. 



U. S. WAR FINANCING 

The circular of the National City 
Bank of New York savs: The War 




38 



July 20, 1918 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 



iiiiini!; 



BRIEFS 
THE extent to which enemy inspired incendiarism 
and sabotage has prevailed in the United States has 
been so much greater than in Canada that many 
of our plant owners may be permitted themselves 
to be lulled into a false feeling of security. An 
ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure, 
and precautions against enemy damage are just as 
essential as precautions against fire, contagious dis- 
ease or any other known and avoidable danger. 
Despite the care and knowledge displayed in the 
erection of war time factories, there are always S'Ome 
few things which need adjusting after work is started 
and many of these involve a high degree of tact 
and good administration before they are finally dis- 
posed of. 

* * * 

MERCHANDISE is the equivalent of money from 
a trading standpoint, and should be dealt with in 
the matter of credits similarly to the manner in 
which money is handled by the banks. Many per- 
sons who could not raise a loan of any small amount 
of money from a bank can negotiate a credit of 
many times that amount at the local hardware or 
grocery store simply because the local merchant in 
his desire for increased volume of 'business shuts 
his eyes to the undesirability of granting credit to 
certain customers and to the matter of educating 
the public to place a higher valuation upon his credit. 

MODERN methods are being established throughout 
the business world to-day in keeping with the ad- 
vances of the age, and those who adopt such prin- 
ciplesi are gaining increased |3restige and more friends 
than the ones who stick to the old careless methods 
of years ago. Efficient service in every branch of 
the business is admired by the buying public and 
respect and admiration is gained thereby. There 
is no reason why customers of all classes cannot be 
educated to settle their bill promptly at stated in- 
tervals. There is in fact no good reason Avhy most 
of them should not pay cash. 



manufactured with our present resources an'd mar- 
keted wath more or less facility. 

The attitude of Canadian manufacturers toward 
export business has been the subject of much dis- 
cussion in recent months, and in view of disparag- 
ing remarks from some parties it is interesting to 
note that the Canadian Bank of Commerce has not 
grounds for attributing to Canadian manufacturers 
reluctance to enter foreign markets. 

Discussing the impression that a foreign buyer 
is not as reliable to do bu.'-r'iness with as a domestic 
customer, the bank referred to declares this to be 
erroneous — "It is true that the foreign importer 
frequently seeks time on his purchases, so that if our 
exporters hope to secure orders in countries where 
it is usual to allow 30, 60, 90 or 120 days on pur- 
chases, credit must be granted in accordance with 
the prevailing custom. Credit risks must, of course, 
be carefully scrutinized in the foreign markets as 
in those at home, but the banks and mercantile 
agencies are only too pleased to secure reports on 
foreign traders and to place their facilities at the 
disposal of all shippers. . . A great many of 
our exporters are inclined to insist on cash with 
the order or cash on production of the documents 
at the shipping port, but little can be gained in 
endeavoring to develop an export business along 
these lines. . . Other exporting countries have 
seen fit to grant reasonable credit where conditions 
warrant it, and if our exporters hope to succeed in 
their foreign endeavors they must at least accord 
similar terms; otherwise the business will go else- 
where." 



REMOVING OUR BURDENS 

THE hope for meeting the burdens which the 
war has placed upon us in the way of interest 
obligations is in the production of goods which will 
utilize our natural resources and which can also be 



DEPARTMENT STILL SLEEPING 

IT is refreshing to note that the daily newspapers 
are at last awakening to the seriousness of the 
"deathlike stillness" of Canada's Department of 
Trade and Commerce. For the past two or three 
years the trade newspapers have been urging that 
some action be taken at Ottawa to put some life into 
the Department of Trade and Commerce. At times 
it looked as though some action would be taken to 
waken the sleepers, but matters have been allowed 
to drag on as usual. During the past few weeks many 
daily newspapers throughout Canada, alive at last to 
the serious effects which are bound to become appar- 
ent, are urging that the Department awake to its 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND MKTAL 



39 



duties and opportunities. The Toronto Globe, one 
of the newspapers which has taken up the matter, 
comments as follows: — 

"Canada owes to the creditors abroad who have 
loaned money to the National, Provincial and Civic 
Governments, or who have provided capital for rail- 
way building, for house building, and for the de- 
velopment of indastry, not less than three billions of 
dollars. It requires more than a hundred and fifty 
millions to pay the annual interest bill. The pay- 
ment does not take the form of gold or silver. The 
production of these metals totals scarcely thirty mil- 
lion dollars' yearly. The interest bill is paid chiefly 
by shipping out the products of Canadian farms, 
forests, and factories, and if the exports of Canadian 
products are not at least a hundred and fifty million 
dollars a year greater than the total of the country's 
imports either the people of Canada during that 
year have failed to pay the interest on their foreign 
debt, or their creditors are not demanding their in- 
terest payments, but are reinvesting them in Canada. 
This last consideration may be left out of the calcu- 
lation at the present time. The people of Great Bri- 
tain, who are the chief creditors of Canada, are not 
reinvesting interest in Canada. They need every 
dollar they can gather from their investments abroad 
to finance their tremendous war efforts. 

"If, therefore, the debtors of the Dominion indi- 
vidually and collectively are to pay the interest on 
their obligations Canadian exports for the first quar- 
ter of the fiscal year which began on April first should 
be about $37,500,000 greater than the imports. What 
are the facts? Imports, $251,391,000 ; exports of do- 
mestic produce, $258,673,000. This is an exceed- 
ingly poor record, the worst in years. The falling off 
in exports compared with 1917 is $71,815,000 for the 
three months. The decline is chiefly in agricultural 
products, the exports of which dropped from $141,- 
105,000 in the first quarter of 1917 to $81,502,000 
in the first quarter of 1918. This enormous decline 
took place at a time when the farmers of the Do- 
minion were raising live stock and producing dairy 
products upon a scale never before attempted in the 
Dominion. 

"What Ls the explanation? Manifestly a short- 
age of shipping. Since April first almost a million 
American soldiers and the necessary supplies and 
munitions for their use have been transported to 
France. That has caused the diversion of Allied 
shij^ping from all over the world to American ports. 
Canada has suffered in the process. There must be 
large accumulations of Canadian products at tide- 
water and interior depots. The Department of Trade 
and Commerce has a plain duty to perform. Now 
that the first rush of American troops is over there 
should be insistence on the return to Canadian trade 
routes of vessels diverted from them. The liners 
which formerly sailed from Montreal during the sea- 
son of St. Lawence navigation carried great quanti- 



ties of dairy products and other perishalble freight. If 
the flow of our exports to Europe is stopped, paralysis 
of industry, and especially of agricultural industry, 
will speedily follow. There is need for Sir George 
Foster and the officers of his department to be up 
and doing. Canada needs more ships — now." 



ON KEEPING A SCRAP BOOK 

HOW often does it happen that the merchant sees 
in his trade journal or elsewhere some idea that 
he thinks at the time he could make use of? He 
makes a mental note to keep track of that idea, and 
then something crops up, an extra busy week, or 
clerk away or something of the kind, and before he 
knows it the idea is either entirely forgotten, or the 
details of it mislaid. Memory is not always to be 
counted on, and for that reason many a good idea is 
wasted. For this reason one progressive merchant 
has adopted a policy that might well be of service to 
many. He keeps a scrap book, a scrap book devoted 
to his store. When he reads in his trade paper some- 
thing that might be of service to him in his business, 
he promptly clips it out and pastes it in the book. 
Items of interest in his business culled from the news- 
papers and many other sources are also included, and 
as a result he has gathered a treasure trove of ideas 
and information that is of constant service to him. 
The idea may not be of service at the moment, but 
may come in useful later. Hardware and Metal ha? 
received many letters asking for information for this 
or that item that appeared in its columns perhaps 
years before. This information can usually be sup- 
plied, but there are a multitude of other sources of 
assistance that once neglected cannot be recovered, 
and for such as these the scrap book idea Ls one that 
might cbmmend itself to the majority of merchants. 



TEA3J WORK IN THE STORE 

THERE are far too many merchants who do not 
make the most of their clerks. They look upon 
them as merely instruments for passing the goods 
across the counter. When a merchant adopts that 
attitude he has no good ground for complaint if the 
clerk does just that and lets his interest in the mat- 
ter drop when the last sale has been made. 

The great majority of clerks, however, will one 
day own and operate their own stores". They are 
there not only to earn a salary, but to learn a busi- 
ness. In the vast majority of cases they will take a 
real interest in the welfare of the store if this interest 
is encouraged. The merchant who depends on himself 
to generate all the ideas is putting himself at just that 
much of a disadvantage. Many times the clerk is 
more closely in touch with the customers than is the 
proprietor. If he is put on his mettle he will in nine 
cases out of ten largely increase his own selling power 
and that of the store. Many merchants have found 
this fact to be true in actual experience, and have 
found it of value to delegate some of their authority 
to their clerks. 



40 



July 20, 191S 



Make the Chimney Draw Well 

Much Depends on Kind of Ventilator Placed on Top — Emerson Type Deflects Wind 

From Whatever Direction it Blows and Gives a Horizontal Current of Air 

Over Top of Chimney — How to Make Ventilator 



THIS is the season of the year when 
hardwaremen with tinsmithing 
and heating departments should 
begin to lool< forward to the fall trade. 
Evidence of this is already to hand by 
an inquiry as to the way to make a ven- 
tilator for a chimney top. The method 
of making a ventilator has previously 
been described in HARDWARE AND 
METAL, but for the benefit of those 
who may be interested again the pro- 
cess is again described. 

The accompanying illustration. Fig. 1, 
describes a type of ventilator which ap- 
pears at first glance to be a common 
one. Many sheet metal workers simply 
make this top with pieces A C and D, 
but such tops are little better than orna- 
ments, except that piece A serves as a 
cover to the pipe D. 

The top described in Fig. 1 is known 
as an improved Emerson ventilator, the 
old and original Emerson top was fitted 
with a flat top, which took the place of 
the solid cone A.B. It will be noted that 
the two slanted surfaces B.C. will de- 
flect the wind from whatever direction 
it blows, so as to form a horizontal cur- 



rent of air over the top of the open end 
of pipe D, and not only will this top give 
satisfaction as a ventilator, but also as 
a chimney top too. 

The first step to take when develop- 
ing patterns for such a piece of work is 
to draw the elevation Fig. 1. The size 
of cone A.B. and flared piece C should 
be about two-thirds the diameter of the 
pipe and the cone should have a depth 
from upper and lower point of about 
one-quarter its own diameter. Piece C 
should be flared at a little over twice 
that of the cone. The perspective view, 
Fig. 4, shows a fairly well balanced de- 
sign, which is not only effective, but 
looks well proportioned. 

Having drawn the elevation on the 
centre line a b extend the slant line c d 
to e on ab as shown at d e, and with e 
as centre draw a circle. Fig. 3, which is 
the half pattern of piece C. 

Next place the compass at f and draw 
two arcs from c to dotted line ab, and 
divide this arc into five equal parts, 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and transfer same to arc 
in Fig. 3, and repeat, beginning with 6 



to 1, and 1 to 6. Then by using e on Fig. 
1 as centre and d as radius, the half 
pattern of C is completed except that al- 
lowance for locks and seams must be 
made. 

To develop the cone requires two full 
pattern pieces, one should be at least 
one-quarter of an inch larger all round 
to allow for seam 

Place point of compass at a, and with 
g as radius draw an arc as shown in Fig. 
2, and transfer the measurements from 
quarter pattern E, Fig. 1 to Fig. 2, as 
shown, beginning at 1 to 6 and 6 to 1. 
This will only give pattern for one-half 
of the design which means that four 
pieces like Fig. 2 are required to make 
a cone. 

The quarter pattern shown at E in 
Fig. 1, is simply a round flat flange 
which forms the lower half of piece C. 
No seam allowance is needed for this 
pipe as it should be fitted to the under- 
side of C, and C should be made large 
to enable it to be placed over piece E. 
Fig. 1 is almost self-explanatory and re- 
quires no further description. 



MPRovED Emerson Yemtilator Top 
f i- 





FlG ^. 



Half Patterm 
OF A.B. Fig 1. 

Half Pattern 
OF C FiGl 



Fig. 1 



July 20, 1918 HARDWAREANDMETAr. 41 



Have You Dressed Up Your 
Auto Accessory Window ? 

If you have and you think it a good one, why not have a 
photo taken and enter it in Hardware and Metal's contest 
for the best window displays of auto accessories? Four cash 
prizes are offered: 

First Prize — $10. 
Second Prize — $5. 
Third Prize — $3. 

In addition $iwill be paid for each window that does not 
get a prize but which is good enough to receive honorable 
mention and which we can reproduce. 

Auto accessories are becoming a big line with the average 
hardware store. They will become still greater as time goes 
by. Many are right now considering the idea of taking on the 
line. 

Those who are already handling these lines should take 
a keen interest in their window displays. It is one of the very 
important points in connection with the selling of these lines. 

Mere is an opportunity for hardware merchants and sales- 
men to show what they are doing in the way of accessory dis- 
plays. Your selling ivindows will no doubt be improved be- 
cause you make the effort to have them the best you know 
how. 

Photos of windows must be at least 5 inches by 7 inches 
and preferably 8 inches by lO inches, printed on glossy paper, 
as the latter kind of paper is best suited to have cuts made 
therefrom. 

Contest closes July 20 and photo must be mailed not later 
than that date. Winners will be announced in our issue of 
July 27. 

GET INTO THE CONTEST AND SHOW 
YOUR ART AT WINDOW DISPLAY. 



42 



July 20, 1918 



IIIIIIIIII 



EVENTS IN THE TRADE 



Business Changes 

CANOEA, Sask.— R. R. Sturgeon has 
purchased the hardware business of I. 
D. White. 



Obituary 



ELMIRA, Ont.— Michael Weichel died 
on Tuesday of this week. He was the 
founder of the hardware firm of M. 
Weichel & Son, of Elmira and Waterloo. 
Mr. Weichel was in his 76th year. 

LONDON, Ont.— The death occurred 
here last week of E. H. Grenfell, for 
upwards of 40 years a travelling sales- 
man for the McClary Mfg. Co. of this 
city. Mr. Grenfell was one of the ola- 
est and best known and also best liked 
travellers on the road. 



Personal 

George Peacock, hardware merchant, 
Mimmico, Ont., was a Toronto visitor 
early in the week. 

J. Mclntyre, hardware merchant, 
Whitby, Ont., was in Toronto on busi- 
ness during the week. 

Mr. Smith of Smith Schaffer, hardware 
merchants, Bolton, Ont., spent a day in 
Toronto this week. 

J. B. Kee of Lawrie's Hardware, For- 
est, Ont., has joined the staff of the 
Sarnia Hardware Co., Sarnia, Ont. 

Frederic Sara, manufacturer's agenu, 
Calgary, Alta., visited the Toronto office 
of HARDWARE AND METAL during 
the week. 

D. B. Ritchie, St. Chrysostome, Que., 
visited the Toronto office of HARDWARE 
AND METAL during the week. Mr. 
I^itchie proposes purchasing a hardware 
business in Ontario and moving his fam- 
ily to the province. 

Joseph Granatstein of M. Granatstein 
& Sons, Ltd., manufacturers of cotton 
waste, Toronto, is ill with typhoid fever. 
His condition is reported as favorable 
and progress towards recovery being 
made. Mr. Granatstein recently joined 
the ranks of the Canadian army. 



Montreal News Notes 

Mr. Knox of Wellpr B»-os'. Department 
Store at Victoria, B. C, was in Mon- 
treal, where he called on the trade. 

Fr. Max Hill, manager for the 
James Walker hardware store, Montreal, 
is taking a holiday of several w^eks. 

J. M. Shellenberger, with Baeder, 
Adamson and Co., Philadelphia, was a 
visitor to Montreal this week. 

Thos. A. Arzidone of the sales depart- 
ment, Binney and Smith Co., New York, 



spent some time calling on the Montreal 
trade this week. 

L. M. Croft, manager of the Western 
division of S. C. Johnson and Son, Ra- 
cine, Wis., was in Montreal during this 
week. 

E. Bourret, late warehouse manager 
of Lewis Bros., Ltd., died recently and 
was buried from his home in Montreal. 
His connection with Lewis Bros., Ltd., 
covered many years, as he entered their 
employ while still a boy. 




Late E. H. Grenfell for upwards of 40 
years a traveller for McClary Mfg. Co., 
London, Ont. 

L. L Matts, for many years a general 
merchant of Feme Neuve, Quebec, died 
very suddenly last week. Mr. Matts " 
had just gone to his summer cottage .'t 
Old Orchard Beach and was suddenly 
stricken after arriving there. He was 
quite widely known in this district, hav- 
ing been also connected with a number 
of other business enterprises. 

Mr. Taylor of the late firm of Taylor 
Bros., Vankleek Hill, was in Montreal 
this week. The above firm is suceeded 
by the Perfection Manufacturing Co., 
Ltd., who will undertake the manufac- 
ture of milking machines at VankleeK 
Hill. 

Foreign Trade agent E. I. Omelt- 
chenko, of the Central War Industries 
Committee of Russia, at Washington, 
stated in Montreal a few days ago that 
there would be splendid opportunities 
for trade between Canada and Russia 



lirs 



after the war. Among other things he 
advocated a direct steamship line be- 
tween Canada and Russia, in fact two 
of them, one to operate between Van- 
couver and Vladivostock and another be- 
tween Montreal and Petrograd. He em- 
phasized the value of the work done by 
the Canadian Trade Commissioner to 
Russia and advocated the continuance 
of this. 



London Picinc 

Date Changed 

On account of transportation difficul- 
ties the London, Ont., hardwaremen 
have changed the date of their annual 
picnic to Wednesday, August 7. The 
hardwaremen are planning to hold a 
bigger and better picnic than ever, and 
as a result, to make further donations 
to the Byron Sanatorium, a most worthy 
institution. 



Sanderson-Pearcy Co. 

Burned Out 

TORONTO, Ont.— A spectacular fire 
destroyed the warehouse, paint and oii 
plant of Sanderson Pearcy & Co., Ade- 
laide Street, on Sunday morning. The 
fire was a most stubborn one to fight 
requiring the efforts of a large force of 
firemen and over 30 streams of water, 
including the high pressure system. The 
loss on stock and fixtures is estimated at 
$130,000, with insurance of $123,000. 
The company has already opened tem- 
porary offices at 88 Adelaide street west 
and is now carrying on business. It is 
probable that new premises will be ac- 
quired where trackage facilities are 
available, and where there will be 
greater room for the company's expand- 
ing business. 



Toronto Hardwaremen 

Hold Picnic 

The third annual picnic of Toronto 
Hardware Travellers and Merchants was 
held on Wednesday afternoon at Lamb- 
ton Park. A motor parade formed at 
Queen's Park and upon arrival at Lamb- 
ton Park an extensive programme of 
sports was carried out. A baseball game 
and a drawing contest also proved popu- 
lar features. In the evening dancing 
and entertainment at the pavilion pro- 
vided a pleasant evening for the pick- 
nickers. Donations of prizes were made 
by manufacturers and wholesalers. The 
officers in charge of the picnic were J. 
C. McFadden, chairman, J. Buscombe, 
secretary, J. Caslor, treasurer. 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



4S 



MANUFACTURERS ADOPTING WAR-TIME FINISHES 

Manufacturers of mechanics' tools, cutlery and steel goods with a polish 
are now turning out their products without the former finish, terming 
it a "war-time" finish. Nail hammers, for example, are now being shipped 
with a black finish, only the pole and the outside of the claws being 
polished. This change, however, will not in any way effect the working 
qualities of the tools but they will not have the same highly finished 
appearance that they had formerly. , 

These changes have been made at the instigation of the governments, 
in order to release high-priced labor for more essential work, and it is 
to be hoped that the users and the trade in general will treat these con- 
ditions in the proper spirit and so contribute in this way to the release 
of this class of labor. 

It will, of course, not be possible for jobbers to advise their customers 
of the changes as they come into force and the only intimation that such 
changes have been made will be when the goods are received by the mer- 
chant. 



Thos. Pink Co. 

Plant Destroyed 

PEMBROKE, Ont.— For the second 
time within a week this town has been 
visited by a disastrous fire, the second 
fire starting where the first one was 
stopped. The plant of the Thos. Pink 
Mfg. Co., manufacturers of lunibermg 
tools, occupying a whole block, has been 
destroyed with a loss of upwards of 
$400,000. Despite the fact that two 
watchmen were on the property the fire 
had made great headway before being 
discovered. Among other places de- 
stroyed in the same fire is the hardware 
store of Stewart & Bowden. 



Halifax Building 

is on the Boom 

HALIFAX.— The work of recon- 
struction goes on rapidly, and the value 
of the building permits for the month 
of June, chiefly on this account, was 
$200,000, as compared with $102,750 for 
the month of June last year. The tota; 
for the year to date is $975,192. The total 
for the month of May was slightly higher 
than in June, namely, $298,940. These 
totals do not include the work that is 
being carried on by the Dominion Gov- 
ernment or the military authorities. 

The Relief Commission will start worK 
soon on the construction of forty houses 
of concrete in the devastated area, and 
in addition some wooden houses in Dart- 
mouth. Preliminary work for the tem- 
porary building and train shed at the 
south end terminals is going ahead. Woi'k 
on several hospitals will soon be com- 
pleted, including an addition to the chil- 
dren's hospital. 



Change in Eastern 

Steel Co.'s 

SYDNEY, N. S.— Col. D. H. McDou- 
all has resigned as manager of the Dom- 
inion Steel Corporation and will become 
president of the Nova Scotia Steel and 
Coal Company, succeeding F. H. Crock- 
ard, who has resigned to enter upon new 
duties in the United States. Mr. Crock- 
ard succeeds Col. Cantley. 

Mr. McDougall was appointed as- 
sistant general manager of the Do- 
minion Coal Company in 1909. 

Mr. McDougall's connection with the 



Dominion Iron and Steel Company has 
been almost continuous sines the turning 
of the first sod in the construction o"f 
the pliant at Sydney, since which time 
he has been successively resident engin- 
eer, resident manager of the Wabana 
iron ore mines, superintendent of mines 
and quarries, and latterly general man- 
ager of the Dominion Steel Corporation, 
which position he has filled since the be- 
ginning of 1916. The Steel Company 
properties have undergone extensive ex- 
pansion under his direct supervision. 
Mr. Dougall's successor has not yet 
been named. 



F. Morton Morse Back 

F. Morton Morse, president of the 
Miller-Morse Hardware Co., Winnipeij-, 
has returned from Victoria, B.C., after 
an absence of five months. He went there 
for his health, after an attack of double 
pneumonia. At one time his condition 
was critical, but his friends will be glad 
to learn that he has completely recov- 
ered. 



Reducing Deliveries 

Important Savings Effected by Retail 
Stores 

WASHINGTON.— It has just been re- 
ported to the conservation division of 
the War Industries Board that prac- 
tically all of the retail stores of New 
York City have decided to comply with 
the request of the Government for 
economies in delivery service. The re- 
quest is that each store shall make only 
one delivery a day over each route, 
eliminate special deliveries, and refuse 
to accept the return of merchandise that 
has remained in the customers' posses- 
sion more than three days. 

Other cities in which the merchants 
have recently adopted the conservation 
programme are St. Paul, Minneapolis, 
Detroit, Denver, Boston, Memphis, New 
Orleans, Montgomery, Baltimore, New- 
ark, Los Angeles, Portland, and Oak 
land. These are in addition to those 
which have previously complied with the 
request made by the Government in time 
of war for the general welfare of the 
country. 

The adoption of this programme has 
made it possible to avoid replacing em- 
ployees who have been drafted or who 
have entered essential war work. The 



large stores of 30 cities have been able 
to operate with 35 per cent, less of a 
force, and the saving in automobile 
trucks has been 40 per cent. This 13 
according to the reports made by these 
stores to the War Industries Board. Lim- 
iting the return of merchandise to not 
more than three days has made an aver- 
age reduction of 36 per cent, in tiie 
amount returned, because of greatei 
forethought in the selection and order- 
ing of goods. 

In smaller stores one delivery a day 
has enabled one delivery man to do 
the work that formerly required two. 
In 30 small stores in several towns in 
one Eastern State the number of de- 
livery men employed has been reduced 
from 116 to 55, as their men have been 
called away for other service. 



British Manufactures 

to Extend Trade, etc. 

Through co-operative scheme mean to 
cover trade in Canada more thorough- 
ly — Will give Canadian buvers better 
service and price — Details being work- 
ed out at present — Various metal 
trades will be interested. 
A policy of very considerable signifi- 
cance is contemplated by a large group 
of British manufacturers in connection 
with their overseas trade development. 
This will apply primarily to Canada but 
it is proposed to make it so comprehen- 
sive as to encompass most of the Over- 
seas Dominions. 

The schemes proposed and now receiv- 
ing consideration are, in the first in- 
stance, confined to the development of 
the bicycle and accessory trades. Re- 
cently, however, it has been considered 
possible to embrace several other lines 
of manufactured goods and in this con- 
nection various products of copper, 
brass and other metals will figure pro- 
minently. 

HARDWARE AND METAL is inform- 
ed on the best of authority that plans 
are thus far advanced to the point where 
a real active interest is assured by those 
approached in the scheme outlined. 
Legislation is being secured and the de- 
tails are now under advisement. In the 
near future HARDWARE AND METAL 
will be in a position to further inform its 
readers of the details and to give a more 
specific announcement of the proposals. 
It is probable that when such details 
T^-^Ye been comnleted, stocks of mart" 
British lines sold through the trade will 
be available with a minimum of delay 
and at very favorable prices. 



A Gasoline Tax 

DETROIT. — Announcement from 
Washington that the Treasury Depart- 
ment has recommended to the Ways and 
Means Committee of the House of Rep- 
resentatives a list of "luxuries" upon 
which it suggests that heavy taxes be 
levied in the new revenue bill, and among 
which recommendations is a tax of ten 
cents a p-allon on gasoline, created a 
feeling little short of consternation 
among automobile manufacturers. 



44 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 



MORE PAINT SHOULD BE USED AND SOLD 

; .-.••-)., (Cont:nu:d T. om page 35.) 

prbbably'^noticed during the last winter that one of the 
■brush manufacturers has been advertising his goods in 
some of the larger daily papers, amongst them were paint 
brushes. His ads. were good, well illustrated and showed 
4ip'iine. I must confess I took more than usual interest 
in them. Time and again he had them running when 
there wasn't a paint ad. anywhere in sight in newspapers 
or anywhere else. That looked funny to me, and the 
more ;l thought it over, the more I admired the indepen- 
dent , goi^rsige of the man in bucking up against what 
seemed to me a lack of sequence in events. I've sold 
a good inany,, gallon^ of paint out there in the shop, Jim, 
and foUbwed'il up with a lot of sales of brushes, but I've 
yet to sell a brush and then have a man buy paint for 
the sake of getting action out of his purchase. You can 
see for yourself that if we sell more . paint, the sale of 
more brushes will naturally follow not only to painters but 
to householders as well, but I haven't very much hope 
that the sale of more brushes will have much encourage- 
ment to the paint trade. I don't mean to discourage this 
man in advertising his individual brand of brushes. He's 
done good work and I'm going to sit up and take more 
notice of his goods from what he's already done. But 
you can see with one eye that a little investment in this 
'more paint' fund would not only bring him results from 
that source, but would greatly strengthen returns from 
his individual efforts." 

Time and Place Even For Advertising 

"Never thought of it that way before," mused Rogers, 
"my old dad always tried to drum it into me that there 
was a time and place for everything — but like a lot of 
other fellows I never thought it applied to advertising." 

"Too many advertisers have been tricked into think- 
ing that all they had to do was shut their eyes and cast 
their advertising bread upon the waters at flood tide, 
ebb tide, or any old time and then wondered why it never 
came back even after waiting many days and moons. 
It has often come to me that a little more logic injected 
into some advertising I've seen done would lead to less 
disappointment and more returns." 

"Right you are," affirmed Rogers, "but since we're 
only at the dollars and cents stage of our plans how 
much money do you expect from him." 

"It would be difficult to tell just whether this 'more 
paint' campaign would increase the sale of brushes in 
proportion to the expected returns for paint or not. Since 
his actual production has only been about 15 per cent, 
of the paint manufacturers during the same periods we 
could only expect him to put in his investment in that 
proportion. However, I've told you about this to show 
the probable effect this scheme would have upon other 
trades related to the paint business." 

"That makes another $3,600; going up like a regular 
little old Patriotic Fund," exclaimed Rogers; "now then 
for Mr. Jobber." 

Here Wright laughed. "Mr. Jobber is so unused to 
getting into water of this kind that he'll shiver like the 
small boy at the old swimmin' hole before his first spring 
plunge." 

"Tie knots in his shirt and throw it over on the other 
bank so's he'll have to swim for it," cried Rogers, "that's 
the way I learned to swim. It's roughstuff but it gets 
you on to the knack of keeping your head above water." 

"Seriously though," proceeded Wright, "I guess you 
and I know Mr. Jobber well enough to realize that he 
will have to be just invited in and leave it to his own 
free will to drop whatever small change he feels like on 
the collection plate." 

"I'm not very strong on donation parties, Charley. It 
leaves you about in the same fix as the country parson 
after the church's annual donation bee. A couple of 
Sundays after it took place, his family came marching 
down the aisle just as he was announcing his text: 'Behold 
Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of 
these.' " 

"How much have we in the treasury now, Jim?" asked 
Wrisht with amusement at Roger's smile. 

"Fortv-two thousand three hundred dollars net — plus 
vour jobbers friends' free will offering," replied Rogers 
after totalling his figures. 



"By the way," enquired Rogers, "where do you retailers 
come in on this investment? Looks to me, Charley, as 
though you're trying to slide out the side door and pass 
the buck to the rest of us. Mighty nice of you to stand 
round waiting till this scheme works out, then reach up 
on the shelf for the paint and tap up your cash register 
without throwing into the hat for the piper." 

"Ha!" laughed Wright, "now you're pinching me, Jim. 
Think you've got a shirker, don't you? Well, I'm one 
of the breed, afflicted by and with all the sins of omission 
and commission, common to the tribe. However, you've 
been on the road long enough to know that we are a 
pretty ornery bunch when it comes to forking over real 
money. In a good many ways we are as bad as you 
manufacturers in camouflaging our business to ourselves 
because we've never stood off and given ourselves a good 
straight up and down look over. We're pretty good fel- 
lows all round but to deny that we've got our faults 
would be foolishness in the extreme. As a whole we're 
not much better nor not much worse than other bodies 
of men. We've got some kinks that could very well be 
straightened out and we've got some good qualities that 
I think could be developed in our paint departments with 
a 'more paint' campaign to back us up. I can't for the 
life of me bring myself to think that now and for all 
time the manufacturer cannot do absolutely without us 
in the distribution of his goods. Co-operative societies, 
mail order houses and recent developments in house-to- 
house canvassing have convinced me that we retailers 
have got to steo up and toe the line in retail merchandis- 
ing. Some fellows think they are indispensable as re- 
tailers. All right! Let us suppose that the manufacturers 
should suddenly jump out from behind us both in supply- 
ing us with goods and in advertising. It would leave us 
nretty high and dry. I don't think they will, but still 
I can never get it out of the back of my head that some 
day they might have the power to do so. However, to-day 
and for some days to come our interest will be pretty 
much entangled with each other — perhaps I ought to say 
knitted — because good knitting is a mighty sight more 
useful than a tangle. Now then it's up to both the re- 
tailers and manufacturers to tend closer to this knitting, 
straighten out any snarls and promote their mutual in- 
terests with a clear understanding of each other's aims 
and usefulness in the trade." 

"A good deal of a salesman's job is to spread the 
salve," ventured Rogers; "the hard knocks of the road 
teach him to pocket the kicks and shortcomings of his 
customers, keep the glad hand wagging and shoot the 
sunshiny smile. However. I believe I can safely confide 
to you, Charley, that I often feel as though I'd like to 
"ut a well-placed number ten boot into some retailers' 
business methods where it would do the most good." 

Retailers the Spoiled Babies 

"You've hit it right there," broke in Wright, "it's 
been a case of too much for nothing in your wasteful 
advertising competition. You paint fellows have been 
paying too much attention to out-doing each other in 
eiving stuff away instead of makine your advertising pay. 
You've made us retailers the spoiled babies in the trade — 
and it's no wonder that you've developed the little tin- 
god idea in the heads of some whose perspective in askew 
in ideas of merchandising. I heard a missionary say 
once that if you give Bibles away to the heathen they 
forget or neglect them — charge them a little and they 
take them home and read the Good Word. It's pretty 
much the same with your advertising. Fix it so that 
we get a little of our own money tied up in your advertis- 
ing. Where vou get our money tied up you're sure to 
drag in a little of our moral support with better returns 
fo^- both of us and far less wasteful expense to your- 
selves." 

"Ts that your u]p^ of o-etting the retailer to chip in 
on this iriA'estment ?" asked Rogers. 

"It's about the only way that I know of that's likelv 
to be successful. Make us fellows paddle our own canoes 
for a while. It won't hurt us to get a little advertising 
eyerci<'P of this sort — fact of the matter we would be 
a healthier bunch if we did. If you manufacturers under- 
take a f-^neral 'more paint' campaign you'll have your 
hands full without dabbling into every little local hole 
and corner on the man. sunplv us with all the ide^s you 
can scrape up. Let us know what's going on. Give us 



July 20, 1918 



II A R D ^V A R E AND M E T A J. 



:,.,;;>'!' 



4) 



cuts and other helps if you want to, but make it pMin 
that we've got to pay for the space used." 

"The trouble is," exclaimed Rogers, "a lot of fellows 
won't use them. I've seen the town pump and horse trough 
taken right up under the noses of some of my customers 
and then they'd refuse to drink." 

Wright smiled. "You'd probably have to do as the 
darky explained to his colored brother about conscription: 
'Dere's no use bein' a conscientious objector; de govern- 
ment '11 just come 'long and take you wheder you wants 
to fight or not. Dey'll hand you a gun and a bayonet and 
march you up to de firin' line wid shells poppin' off all 
'round you; after dat dey leaves you to use your own 
judgment.' You paint men can make general advertising 
campaign shells pop all 'round and if a man can't use 
his own judgment to take advantage of it, there's plenty 
of others around that will. In a nut shell my idea is 
that you fellows should provide a general awakener to 
the public by means of this 'more paint' campaign. Use 
it as a background for the retailers' local advertising. 
Put it up to the local man to use it along lines which 
you can outline in your trade papers and through the 
mail and you'll probably find that the retailer can con- 
tribute a pretty neat little sum in this way." 

Some Wide-awake Retailers Pay 

"You're right there," reflected Rogers, "there's more 
ways than one of choking besides on butter. While 
there's a lot of my customers foot part or all of their 
paint advertising bills, there's a lot that put up an unholy 
roar if you even hint at them paying out a little for 
their own welfare and profit. But I've noticed this that 
those that do pay, are the most wideawake and we have 
less trouble and kicks from them about business being 
on the eternal blink." 

"Now there's another way to gauge this budget that'll 
perhaps show us where we can cut down on this sum. 
Perhaps you already know that our friends in the paint 
trade across the border have organized to put a 'more 
paint' campaign of this nature into operation. They figure 
on $100,000 per year to cover their population of 100,- 
000,000 people. Figuring on these proportions, we could 
very comfortably consider $10,000 to $15,000 for Canada 
and it would be a sum not at all out of the way. How- 
ever, I have some new wrinkles in mind that would make, 
say, $20,000, a nice little sum to have around. Divide 
this up in the proportions we have just gone over and it 
wouldn't make a very heavy investment for any of those 
concerned." 

"Well that looks reasonable to me," replied Rogers, 
"so just for the sheer swank of loosening up with some 
loose coin I'll vote you your $20,000. Now let's see how 
much financial debauchery you can execute with that sum 
in your jeans." 

Financial Debauchery? 

"Before I begin leaving stubs in your cheque book, 
Jim, there's one far-sighted provision that our United 
States brethren have arranged that strikes me will be 
the keynote of their success, and I think we ought to 
consider it very carefully. They have based their estimates 
on an amount which shall be a minimum for at least five 
years. To my mind this 'five-year determination' of theirs 
will be the real key to their success. If you fellows had 
got together with a five, eight or ten-year determination 
to keep pounding away at fall painting, clean uo and 
paint up, indoor month painting or whatever all year 
round effort you undertook, I believe you'd have something 
to show for it to-day and my paint department along 
with many others would be up in the front of the store 
where you wanted it. It takes the public some considerable 
time to break away from ingrained habits handed down 
to them from time immemorial. It's only by continually 
battering away year after year in season and out that you 
can hone to accomplish anything. Just between you and 
me and the town constable, I believe that that five-year 
provision of theirs is just as important as the money 
they are raising. Anyhow it's going to do more to insure 
returns for their investment, perhaps, than any other 
part of the scheme. Furthermore, if you're not prepared 
to hand out that $20,000 for the next five years, Jim, we 
might as well save our breath, shut uo shop and call 
the deal all off." 



"Twenty thousand dollars for five years it is then, 
Charley," assured Rogers. 

"Thanks, Jim, that's the kind of sand I like to see a 
man put into any proposition." :- 

"A little mohey mixed with a lot of persistence and a 
determination goes a long way," affirmed Rogers. "As a •] 
salesman, I'll say your point is good^ — in fact, I know : 
it's good from bitter experience. I've seen lots of things, 
put on the market, fail because those behind put in the 
money but forgot to mix a little persistence with it. 
I've also seen sales managers, advertising managers, sales- 
men, everybody down to the little blonde haired flinger 
of form letters hoist themselves into the seventh heaven 
of anticipation over some new-fangjed idea that had lots 
of merit but lacked the backing of this 'five-year deter- 
mination' as you call it. Everything and everybody starts 
off with a hurrah the first year and flattens out ker-plop 
the second year or third; because some other idea dis- 
tracts and sidetracks their enthusiasm. In reality many 
such propositions would be just about ready to sit up 
and take their own nourishment w^hen somebody ■ takes »> 
the bottle, nipple and milk and feeds it to the new infantas' 
in the family. Quite true it's money makes the mare^g^, ' 
but a little bit of the persuader on her fla;D:ksjid:$n't .do . 
any harm occasionally." , -j!j;. ,; j'w '■•.■;•!■ ;• 

An Instance of Co-operative Advertising"^^''*'^ ^-^"^\ 

"If this scheme works out as other co-operative ad- ■; 
vertising efforts have done it's quite likely we won't be 
content to tie ourselves down to just that little $20,000 
per year," added Wright. "I understand the Portland 
Cement Association of the United States have been in- 
creasing their co-operative advertising and promotion in- 
vestment each year since they started it. In 1915 they 
spent $220,000 and increased it to $650,000 in 1916. And 
you know men of this caliber don't increase their invest- 
ments for nothing, so it wouldn't surprise me if we might 
have to fall back on our original estimates and perhaps 
increase our tithes as this thing gets swinging along 
year by year." 

"You're handling cement here in the Acme, aren't 
you?" asked Rogers. 

"Yep! And I know that we have felt the benefits of 
the work they have done." confided Wright. 

"So you think that general advertising of this nature 
works?" pressed Rogers. 

"I sure do," was the confident reply. 

"That settles it," exclaimed Rogers, "if it works with 
one class of building material like cement, why wouldn't 
it work with another? And paints and varnishes are 
used not only when a building goes up, but should be 
used as long as one board holds to another. Another 
thing: There's no dobut our American brethren will be 
using the bigger magazines in their advertising which 
come into Canada at the rate of about 300,000 a month. 
You can't tell me but what that'll have a tremendous 
influence over here. If we Canadians don't do something 
along the same line to clinch that influence by supple- 
menting it with advertising it our own papers and maga- 
zines then I say we ought to be classified amongst the 
galoots. Boy, oh boy! what a chance we'll have if the 
trade will take this thing to heart and prepare itself to 
take the field when our American friends do. If ever 
they had an opportunity handed to them on a silver platter 
it will be then." 

"What's the matter with this little Canadian organiza- 
tion of ours, loosening up their glad hand and extending 
their co-operation to big brother Uncle Sam?" quietly 
asked Wright. 

"Well, it wouldn't hurt Uncle Sam and it would cer- 
tainly do us a lot of good, and I know Sam's got big 
enough heart to say, 'Come right along,' " answered Rogers. 

Rogers by this time had satisfied himself that Wright's 
general working plans would hold water. Undoubted Droof 
of the success of co-operative advertising plans carried 
out by other associations in both United States and Canada 
were furnished him in a booklet which Wright had given 
him during their conversation. Eagerness to laarn Wright's 
ideas to the last detail lead him to press for more ideas 
which he fully recognized came from a practical mind 
balanced with sufficient grounding in every-day experience 
to avoid anything entirely Utopian. 
(To be Continued) 



July 20, 1918 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliilllllllllllll 



NEW HARDWARE GOODS 

OFFERED TO CANADIAN HARDWAREMEN 



MANILA CLOTHES LINES 

The Plymouth Cordage Company is 
placing on the market a new article in 
their Plymouth Manila Clothesline, whicn 
is being furnished for the first time by 
this company in convenient hank form. 
It is claimed for this product that it has 
all the features which clotheslines must 
have to be saleable andi serviceable. K 
is asserted by the manufacturers that 
the new line will not stain the clothes 
or chafe the hands, will not stretch, is 
very pliable. The lines are furnished 
in unit hanks of 50 feet each— four 
hanks connected, which gives the chance 
to sell in convenient 50-foot, 100-foof, 
150-foot and 200-foot lengths. The hanks 
are packed in substantial cartons, which 
hold one-half gross or six dozen hanks 
each — a dozen hanks forming a bundle. 



ELECTRIC STEAM RADIATORS 

Rapid Radiators, Limited, 196 King 
St. W., Toronto, is placing on the mar- 
ket a new electric steam radiator. It is 
claimed for these radiators that they 
will heat a room quickly and can be seL 
up with a minimum of trouble. It is 
also claimed for these radiators that they 
not only create heat but conserve it for 
suitable distribution, as the radiator cir- 
culates the heat on all sides in the same 
manner as ordinary steam radiators. No. 
15 radiator is stated to weigh 50 pounds, 
using 660 watts in 10 hours. No. 20 
radiator is stated to weigh 62 pounds, 
uses 880 watts, and the claim is made 
for it that it will heat a room 8 x 10 x 9 




IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII! 



":'™™™''™'''lll™ll'll>l™l™lllllllllllllllllll- ,„„„ ,„„„„„„„„ „J 



with one window and two sides exposed 
from zero to 70 degrees temperature. 
Ten feet of extension cord, socket and 
plug are supplied with each radiator 
The heating element in each radiator is 
stated to be guaranteed for one year. 



NON-FREEZE SOLUTION 

By perfecting a non-freeze solution 
that the motorist can test with an ordi- 
nary battery hydrometer, the Northwest- 




Electric Steam Radiator 



Twelve-Twenty Non-Freeze Solution 

em Chemical Co., Marietta, Ohio, feels 
that It has supplied a need which has 
been long felt by every motorist who 
has ever driven a ear in freezing 
weather. Norwesco "Twelve-Twenty" is 
the name of this liquid. The easy-to-test 
feature is stated to be the big idea back 
of it, but running close second in im- 
portance is the fact that "Twelve- 
Twenty" requires no mixing or dissolv- 
ing — it comes ready to use right out of 
the can. Because it can so readily be 
tested, it is claimed "Twelve-Twenty" 
does away with all guesswork in connec- 
tion with radiator protection. 

If evaporation or leakage cause 
changes in the solution the hydrometer 
discloses that fact and a weak solution 
may then be restored to standard 
strength by the addition of fresh mate- 
rials. If the test shows undue strength, 
dilution with water corrects the defect. 
A motorist may test his non-freeze solu- 
tion as he does his tires or his battery. 
The fault of "finding" scales is said 
to ^be totally lacking in "Twelve-Twen- 
ty." On the contrary, it is claimed, the 
tendency of the new product is to keep 
the cooling system fluid-tight. Its boii 
ing point is 12 degrees higher than that 
of water, so it evaporates very slowly. 
In this way it overcomes one of the 
chief objections to alcohol mixtures. The 
claim is made, also, that it warms the 
motor more quickly than water, thus re- 
ducing the "popping" and enabling the 
engine to settle sooner into a smooth, 



easy motion. The product is to be sold 
in one-gallon, three-gallon and five-gai- 
lon cans. 



Y PLUG SOCKET 

The Metal Specialties Manufacturing 
Co., 338-352 N. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 
is placing on the market a new article, 
known as the 3P Double Outlet Y Plug 
Socket for autojnobile dashboards. Un- 
like the straight plug socket, it is claim- 
ed. It IS made in a Y shape. This shape 
it IS asserted, converts a single outlet 
mto a double outlet. By using this Y 
plug socket the owner uses his single 
dash lamp socket for two purposes at 
the same time, for example, one side of 
the plug may be used for spotlight and 
the other side either for an inspection 
lamp, regular dash lamp, or cigar 
lighter. The Presto Y plug has a stan- 
dard Ediswan type plug connection on 
one end which can be plugged into any 
dash lamp socket on the dashboard of 
an automobile. It is stated the Y plug 
is neat and ornamental with the exposed 
parts handsomely nickel-plated. It is 
made in three styles as follows: Double 
contact, single contact, and double to 
single contact. 



REED CALIPER 

The Reed Small Tool Works, Worces- 
ter, Mass., are manufacturing a new de- 
sign of caliper micrometer that has re- 
cently been placed on the market em- 
bodying some new features. The frame 
is made of drop forged steel. It is claim- 




Reed Caliper Micrometer 

ed for it that the concaved web is a na- 
tural finger fit and that the tool as a 
whole is well balanced. One spanner is 
used for all adjustments which it is a* 
serted makes a simple way of quick 
changing. The manufacturers claim 
their micrometer caliper will che:k with 
the Johansson gauges to an accuracy of 
one ten-thousandth of an inch. It is 
claimed for the micrometers that they 
are simple, accurate, pleasing in design 
and high value. 



July 20, 19Y8 



47 



THE CLERKS DEPARTMENT 



"JUST AVERAGE ABILITY- 



BUT WORK, AND AN IDEA" 

Marcus Loew's Own Estimate of His Methods in Reach- 
ing Success of Continent-Embracing Kind in 
the Theatre Business 



1 



■FOUND that there was no royal 
road to success, but that what 
we have in this world comes, as 
a rule, only through sheer hard work 
of hands and brains. It was by fight- 
ing for favorite street corners that I 
learned which boys I could lick. It 
was by sizing up my customers that 
I added to my knowledge about hu- 
man nature. And it was because of 
absolute necessity that I forced my 
brain to figure out plans to increase 
my sales of newspapers." 

These words read like the first lines 
of the first chapter in the history of 
more than one great business builder 
of this continent. Not many business 
men, however, know that Marcus 
Loew, the amuser of millions, the 
man who has made it possible for peo- 
ple to enjoy a show pretty much just 
whenever it suits them from daylight 
to dark, began as a newsie. That was 
just how Marcus Loew started, how- 
ever, and here in his own words is an 
account of one of his methods of 
making more sales than his rival 
newsies could manage. 

"On Saturday nights," he says in the 
American Magazine," "I always went to 
the newspaper offices on Park Row, and 
slept on a bale of bags. I did this be- 
cause, if I waited until Sunday morning 
to get the papers I should have to com- 
pete with the other boys. As it was the 
men woke me up at three or four o'clock 
in the morning; I had my papers all 
folded, and I was out on the street 
several hours before the wagons brought 
the papers to the other newsboys. When 
the other boys came on the street they 
would not find me there, and they used 
to wonder why I never sold Sunday 
papers. It v/as not until years later 
th.nt some of them discovered what I had 
done, and how I managed to be in bed 
by the time they were starting to work. 

Good Gear in Small Bulk 

"When I meet new people this is 
generally what happens: First, they ask 
me how I managed to become the owner 
of more than two hundred theatres in 
this country and Canada. Then they 
look down curiously at my five feet six 
inches, and I know they are adding, in 
their own minds: 

"How did a little fellow like you 
ever do it?" 

Forty-six years ago I was born on 
the East Side of New York of parents 



so poor that it hurts to look back to 
those days. Corditions were so bad that 
at the age of six I was selling papers 
on the streets, running errands, and do- 
ing all sorts of odd jobs in the en- 
deavor to help out at home. 

The Spark That Lit Loew's 

Sometimes I went to school, but al- 
ways I sold papers. Though I was little 
more than a baby I fought bitterly to 
hold on to corners where crowds of 
people were passing. My mother would 
beg me not to go out in the freezing 
weather or in storms; but there was a 
spark of something in me that drove 
me out, not only "to get on the job" 
but to try to mr.ke my father and mother 
proud of me. 

Yet, hard enough though the life was, 
it did me good. 

Small Physique as a Spur 

From the time I was eight years old 
I worked at various things. At twelve 
I entered a shop where maps were made. 
At the time I was much smaller than 
other boys of my age. The matter of 
my height and weight came a serious 
problem to me. I once even thought of 
having my neck stretched in an attempt 
to be as tal las other boys. But some- 
how I came to realize that it doesn't 
matter what your physique is, if only 
your brains and knowledge are big 
enough. 

It was my ideas on this subject, how- 
ever, that made me throw up that job, 
for when I asked for a raise one day, 
the boss shouted at me: 

"You Little Peanut!" 

"You little peanut! You ought to be 
glad you are getting such wages. You 
are only a little kid yet." 

I resolved, then and there, to show 
this man what a "peanut" could accom- 
plish in the world. So I told him to 
keep his old job, and I marched out. 

When I was fourteen I got work as 
salesman for a printing plant. I did 
nothing extraordinary — unless you call 
hustling all day long "extraordinary" — 
but the boss liked me and, in spite of 
my being shy on both years and inches, 
I become a full-fledged partner. 

For throe years I remained there, and 
then came the period which arrives to 
many young fellows who achieve a small 
measure of success: I began to think 
I knew everything there was to know 
about the business world. The printing 
business was too small for my abilities, 
I thought. So I quit the firm and went 
into the fur business on borrowed money 
and credit. 

To be brief, I failed, after two years 
of up-hill struggle. During those two 



years, I had sense enough to make a 
proper estimate of myself and to see that 
I was not quite as smart as I had once 
thought I was. Even more important was 
the learning of a lesson that I have 
never forgotten. I was only nineteen 
and so was not responsible for the busi- 
ness debts I had contracted. Many well- 
meaning friends pointed this out to me 
when I came face to face with the pro- 
position either of evading payments of 
my debts and starting a new store with 
fresh credit, or of going to work as an 
employe in order to save enough money 
to pay what I owed. There was only one 
thing to do, and I did it. I went out on 
the road and became a salesman at $30 
a week, paying my mother $12 a week 
to support her, and saving what I could 
from the remainder to pay back the 
$1,900 I owed. That involved, of course, 
much self-denial, but the happiest day 
in my life was the one when that debt 
was paid off. 

It was not until I was twenty-three 
that my big chance to make money came 
along. A man induced me to go into 
the manufacturing of silk capes. And 
we did well fro mthe very first. 

Began Theatre Idea at Thirty 

For ten years, from 1894 to 1904, I 
manufactured silk capes. At thirty, I 
had a large sum of money put away, 
and a prosperous business, but still I 
wasn't satisfied with my life. I was 
beginning to wonder where I would be 
at forty. And so, happening to meet 
just then the man who is now the dear- 
est friend I have, one of the noblest 
characters I have ever met, and my 
business partner still, I went into the 
theatrical busienss on a small scale with 
him. I refer to the greatest character- 
actor in America to-day — Mr. David 
Warfield. 

In Pittsburgh, Warfield had met, and 
had become interested in, a salesman 
for a wonderful machine. You dropped 
a penny into it, turned a crank, and 
saw moving pictures before your eys. 
These were the forerunners of the 
"movies" and Warfield was delighted 
with the- novelty of the idea. He put 
the proposition up to me and, eager to 
invest my money in something new, 
Warfield and I, together with some other 
men, put up forty thousand dollars, and 
built and opened the Penny Arcade on 
Fourteenth Street, New York City. It 
is still running. 

The place was a success from the very 
start; but my ideas of management dif- 
fered from those held by the other 
partners in the concern. So, after a 
short time, Warfield and I withdrew 
our money, and started other arcades 
under our own management. 

Another Failure 

I hated to locate them where they 
would be in direct competition with my 
former partners, and so I chose other 
locations, which turned out to be poor 
ones. At the end of three years I was 
forced to confess that I had made a 
failure. 

But I would not give up. I still had 
faith in the future of penny arcades, 
and moving pictures, and when another 
chance came to go back to the manu- 



48 



facturing business, I turned down the 
offer. 

The value of faith and keeping up 
good cheer is shown, I think, by the fact 
that an arcade purchased a few weeks 
later in Cincinnati turned in a profit 
of fifty thousand dolars the first year 
I ran it. Yet I had worked no great 
magic; I had only installed some new 
machines, freshened up the place a bit, 
and then just watched the crowds pour 
in day and night. 

But it was too dull for me, with 
nothing to do ail day long except watch 
the young and old drop their pennies 
into the machines and turn the cranks 
to see the pictures. I was impatient for 
some real work; and yet it was by 
watching these people that the great idea 
of my life came to me. 

Success, and the Reason For It 

I had been asking myself the reason 
for the popularity of these machines, 
and I worked it out like this: 

"They are successful," I said to my- 
self, "because they are a cheap and 
popular entertainment — above all a 
cheap entertainment. The poor man 
with a small earning capacity wants to 
be amused and entertained just as 
much as the comfortable man or the 
wealthy one. The only difference is 
that he cannot afford to pay two dol- 
lars, one dollar, or even fifty cents for 
a seat in a theatre, and, therefore, he 
crowds the arcade." 

Then the development came tu me. If 
he was willing to spend three or four 
cents to stand up and look at pictures, 
he would be just as willing to pay five 
or ten cents to sit down in a comfort- 
able seat and watch the real motion pic- 
tures on the screen. 

"The Movies" 

I tried in Cincinnati the idea of a 
theater devoted exclusively to pictures — 
and it was an instantaneous success. 
People came flocking to the place at a 
five-cent admission. Realizing that New 
York City would be a gold mine if the 
same principles would work there, I came 
to New York and opened the first real 
motion picture house the city had ever 
seen, taking in as my profit the first 
week five hundred and twelve dollars, 
at five cents a seat. 

My theater contained only one hun- 
dred and sixty seats, but they were con- 
tinuously filled afternoon and evening. 
I gave some six reels of pictures and 
the entertainment lasted for about half 
an hour. 

I could not patent the idea of show- 
ing only motion pictures, but I could 
realize quickly on it. In six months I 
had organized and run under my man- 
agement forty-two theaters in the heart 
of New York, each one of them charging 
five cents and each one making a big 
profit. New York seemed to go wild 
over the idea; and other men began to 
compete with me by opening bigger and 
better picture houses. 

The Typical Loew's Theatre 

It was then that I developed the idea 
of the neighborhood theater. I had 
been right in my idea of the masses 
seeking cheap entertainment, and so I 
had enough confidence in my judgment 
to carry the thing one step further. I 
had been observing that the man or wo- 
man who had worked hard all day, and 
who had traveled down-town to work in 
the morning and up-town again in the 
evening, did not care to travel up and 
down again, get dressed up, and spend 
the car fare necessary to reach a 
theater. In many cases a man would 
not do this even if he could afford to 
pay the high prices; and so I figured 
that from these two classes I could 
draw enough patronage to fill a theater 
giving vaudeville as well as motion pic- 
tures. So I began to build up my 
circuit of vaudeville houses. 

I rented a regular theater in Brook- 
lyn that had been playing two-dollar 



hardwake and metal 



July 20, 1918 



attractions, and put in my idea of a 
good family vaudeville show at prices 
ranging from ten to twenty-five cents, 
making it fifteen cents in the afternoon. 
Everyone scoffed at the idea of turning 
such a fine theater into a movie. house, 
but the first year of my lease it earned 
sixty-three thousand dollars. 

Encouraged by my success I went tc 
other cities, picked out favorable sites, 
and either built or leased theaters which 
I ran under the same policy. As the 
business grew, the small theaters were 
given up and we built nevi^er and more 
modern houses, costing from a half 
million to a million dollars each. In 
Brooklyn, where I made my first start, 
we are now building a theater that will 
cost two million dollars when completed. 



EMERY PAPER 

In names given in Hardware Letter 
Box, page 50, July 6th issue of HARD- 
WARE AND METAL, showing where 
supplies of emery paper are procurable, 
the name of Alexander Gibb, Montreal, 
was omitted. Mr. Gibb represents the 
United States Sand Paper Co., of Wil- 
liamsport. 



THE SPECIALIZED NEWSPAPERS 

(Continued from page 33.) 
three greatest British generals, famous 
in this, war. has written me a three-page 
foolscap letter full of most valuable and 
helpful information. In the course of his 
letter he said of my February article 
on "Why We Are Losing the War," ''I 
THINK YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY 
RIGHT," etc. He then proceeds to show 
how the great military leaders are in 
accord with and want the co-operation 
of the business men, and how certain 
politicians have prevented it, as I have 
been contending all along. What stronger 
endorsation do I need than these woras 
from such a man ? 

"What I cannot understand is that 
other writers and politicians do not see 
things as I do, and carry on the same 
campaign. It requires only ordinary 
common sense. Possibly Sir Harry 
Johnston's explanation as given in a 
recent article in the University of Cam- 
bridge Magazine when he said: 

"A person who like myself is always anxious 
to realize the exact truth about everything, who 



HORSE A CURIOSITY AT 
AUSTIN PICNIC 

Dominion Day celebration at 
Austin, Man., was the largest for 
man-^- years, in fact, the crowd of 
2.000 people who gathered in the 
town for the sports constitutes the 
record in Austin's history, states a 
report in one of the local news- 
papers. Gladstone, MacGregor, Sid- 
ney and other iiearbv towns all 
spnt large quotas while there were 
Eilso manv from Winnineg, visiting 
fripnds in the district. 

One of the most noticeable fea- 
tu'-es of the day was the fact that 
o'llv one buggy was to be seen. 
"^he f'lrmer has deserted the horse 
fo'- pleasure driving and over 200 
automobiles of pverv descriotion. 
from the ubiquitous Ford to the big 
touring car. were to be seen. 



thinks the truth more wonderful, more intricate 
than fiction, who believes that departure from 
the truth or oversight of the truth is much 
more ^ue to laziness, to deficient powers of ob- 
servation, than to maliciousness or direct in- 
spiration from the Devil, is not very happy in 
the world of our own time so fond of illusions. 
Firstly, he is not liked. He finds most of those 
who should be his natural associates and class- 
mates persisting in error, preferring the wrong 
view to the right view because a change of views 
is tiresome. Anyone, therefore, who tells them 
how to spell the name properly, how to read 
the text correctly, how to detect the sham or 
the anchronism is as objectionable as the ma- 
laria expert at the India Office or the accurate 
translator of Rumanian at another office. Second- 
ly, he is not believed. He can't be right because 
Ruskin did not think so, because the Church 
has always held. etc.. because the Cabinet must 
have been fully aware at the time. ... Be- 
cause you would not surely set yourself ap 
against Mr. Gladstone? and you don't imagine 
for a moment Eir Edward Grey overlooked this, 
or Sir Sidney Lee forgot that, or Sir Oliver 
Lodge invented the other thing? In short, we 
are most of us disinclined to question the authority 
we are too busy or too idle-minded to investi- 
gate. We are a prey to that inversion of genius 
which is an incapacity to take pains. It is so 
much easier in writing and in painting to be 
vague and inaccurate that whole schools of art 
and literature have arisen under the false re- 
ligion of the imagination ; nay, religions them- 
selves have been painstakingly reared on false 
premises and exaggeration, on dreams and guesses, 
on hearsay that was not verified, on any- 
thing rather than a plain statement of fact, even 
though that fact or that group of facts was 
far more wonderful to an educated mind than 
the silly and impossible legend or the reputed 
miracle could be to the untrained intelligence 
which so easily believed the incredible." 

TO ORGANIZE AUTO OWNERS 

Active steps are now being taken to 
organize a protective association for 
automobile owners of the Island of 
Montreal, and it is the intention to call 
tbis much needed organization the 
"Montreal Automobile Association." 

It is proposed to make the annual fee 
$5, and in addition to maintaining an 
accurate and up-to-date route informa- 
tion bureau, many features for membei? 
will be arranged, such as free legal ad- 
vice, reduced insurance rates, club rooms, 
etc. 

The aims and objects of the associa- 
tion will be to promote the interests of 
its members generally, and it is hoped 
that at a very early date the member- 
ship will be strong enough to make its 
weight felt and so enable the executive 
to tho^-oup'hly tackle the very many burn- 
ing questions of importance to automo- 
bile owners. 

T. C Kirby is devoting his entire ener- 
gies towards the organization of this 
association and the governing bodv will 
consist of a number of influential Mont- 
real motor enthusiasts. 



FINDS USE FOR ENVELOPES 

R. S. Woodruff hardware merchant of 
Chinook, Alta., finds a good use for all 
empty envelopes from his mail by put- 
ting them in a convenient place near the 
wood screws and uses them to wrap 
screws and other small articles. 



July 20, 1918 



49 



WEEKLY HARDWARE MARKET REPORTS 

STATEMENTS FROM BUYING CENTRES 



!l!lllllllll!l:!;::!:i!l!l!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll(l 



THE MARKETS AT A GLANCE 

ANOTHER eight to ten-cent advance in linseed oil has 
been recorded during the week, and the future is one 
of decided uncertainty. Most certainly lower prices 
are not looked for and that even higher levels may be 
reached seems quite possible. Seed shows another jump 
in price for the week, and the outlook for supplies is none 
too bright. 

Mixed paints are in a very firm position, and higher 
prices have been reached as HARDWARE AND METAL 
goes to press. The advances in linseed oil, with prospects of 
further ones being made, coupled with the recent advances 
made in white lead in oil, are considered factors. 

Eavetrough, conductor pipe, ridge roll and kindred 
lines have made an advance of 10 per cent, during the 
week. This follows higher prices named on corrugated 
sheets, metal ceilings and shingles some time ago, and is in 
line with predictions made in HARDWARE AND METAL 
at that time. 

Revised prices are announced on tarred roofing felt, 
tarred and dry building paper, coal tar, roofing cement and 
heavy dry and tarred strawboard. The present scale of 
prices provides for advances in each instance, which, while 
not very heavy, reflect the tendency of the market. 

Manufacturers of woodenware are faced with continually 
increasing costs which is borne out in many advances on 
their lines. Among the lines affected this week are clothes 
pins, clothes horses, pastry boards and skirt boards, with 
higher levels looked for on tubs. 

Wool waste and wipers have both reached a higher level 
of quotations. One manufacturer of cow ties, dog and hal- 
ter chains, tie-out chains and kindred lines has announced 
new prices which show an advance of about 12 1/2 per cent., 
though jobbers have not yet changed their quotations. 

Other lines to undergo revision during the week are food 
choppers, single-barrel shotguns, cross-cut saw handles, 
toilet clippers, flashlight bulbs, mouse and rat traps, steel 
squares, night latches, tackle blocks, rivet sets and egg 
beaters. Advances are recorded in each instance. 



MONTREAL MARKETS 



MONTREAL, July 18.— Hardware 
markets are quiet this week with- 
in the city. Country trade is 
very much better, a good demand being 
noticeable for harvest tools and these are 
going forward in good order at the pres- 
ent time. Price changes are being worked 
out on certain lines and in the meantime 
the revisions for the week are confined to 
various lines of auto accessories and to 
seine twine, which scored a strong ad- 
vance, one brand of horse nails, ready 
roofing and felt, wire rope thimbles and 
a line or two of building paper. The 
tendencies point to higher prices for 
stoves and ranges, although bookings are 



being accepted on present prices for 
shipment up to September! All twines are 
firm. Tin is again strong in London and 
harder to get forward; lead also is very 
firm. The expected change in freight 
tariffs will have a decided bearing on 
many lines, but these will depend upon the 
date when the rates become effective. 

Carburetors Moved 

Up About Ten Per Cent. 

Montreal. 

CARBURETORS.— Increases have been 
made in the price of carburetors. This 
applies to those known as Rayfield and the 



new prices are as folio—- "' '^-2, each 
$28.50; G-3, $33.56; G-4, $38.80; G-5, 
$46.50; G-6, $51.75; 1-2, $25.88; 1-3, 
$28.50; D 44-45, $37.88; C.B. and D-55 
each also $37.88. Rayfield-Dodge, $29.06; 
Reo 6, $35.81 and Reo 4, $20.62. 

New Prices For Parts 

On Carburetors, Wheels 

Montreal. 

STEERING WHEELS. — Revised 
prices are out for part of Rayfield 
carouretors. These are shown on the net 
price list now and the advance is from 10 
to 15 per cent, on the complete line. Ford 
steering wheels also are revised in price, 
the 17 inch selling now at $10.13 net. 
Esta water auxiliator is now priced at 
$15.00 each. 

Portable Cranes Up, 

Also Grease Cups 

Montreal. 

AUTO CRANES, GREASE CUPS.— 
The prices are revised on Manley cranes 
with hoist mechanisms. The old price on 
number 76 was $109.53 and the new is 
$117. The number 80 selling previously 
at $157.24 is moved up to $168.75, net. 
Samson grease cups are advanced to $1 
each from 90c and from $1 to $1.20 for 
number 801. 

Bumpers and Windshields 
Are Revised in Price 

Montreal. 

BUMPERS, WINDSHIELDS.— Lyon 
bumpers have declined in price. No. 
102 selling previously at $16.12 is re- 
duced to $15.23 net; No. 26 down from 
$16.12 to $15.23; No. 8 from $13.95 to 
$13.05 and the same applies for No. 18. 
Ford windshields are higher. Number 
317 is now $16 and was before $13.20 and 
the same revision applies to number 100 
with filler board. The style with slip 
dash for number 100 is now $19.20, this 
superseding the previous price of $16. 
These quotations are F.O.B. the factory. 

New Hi^h Prices On 

Cotton Seine Twines 



Montreal. 

SEINE TWINES. — Advances have 
been more frequent in connection with 
the prices asked for seine twines than for 
almost any other item in the list. The 
new prices make a high record and those 
obtaining at present are as follows: Six 
thread 76V4c; 9-thread 73c; 12-thread 72c 
and 15 thread and larger IWzC per pound. 
The terms are net 30 days. 



50 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



July 20, 1918 



Horse Nails and 

Roofing Are Higher 



Montreal. 

HORSE NAILS, ROOFING, FELTS. 
— Peerless horse nail list has been chang- 
ed and the new list quotations are as fol- 
lows: No. 5, 22c per lb.; No. 6, 21c; No. 
7, 20c; No. 8, 19c and Nos. 9, 10, 11 and 
12, 18c; the discount is 10 per cent. 
Tarred felt is advanced to $3.50 per 100 
lbs. and ready roofing of one brand is 
$1.20 per square for 2-ply and $1.48 for 
3-ply. Rideau dry paper is 60c and tarred 
of the same make 75c. 

Wire Rope Thimbles 

And Fencing Higher 

Montreal. 

WIRE ROPE THIMBLES, FENCING. 
— Advances are made for wire rope thim- 
bles of the tinned variety and the new 
prices are as follows: For % inch, $5.60; 
5/16, $6.75; %. $8.00; Vz, $10.25; %, 
$16.80; %, $19.60; %, $25.60 and 1 inch 
■$32.80 per 100. A new list also has been 
issued on the Dominion line of wire fenc- 
ing. 

Iron and Steel 

Hold Very Firm 

Montreal. 

IRON AND STEEL.— A good trade 
obtains for iron and also for some lines of 
steel bars. This is more marked from 
country dealers than from those inside the 
city. While prices are without any change 
some are expecting that an advance may 
be effected in the immediate future. 

Common bar iron, per 100 lbs $ 4 55 

Refined iron, per 100 lbs 4 80 

Horseshoe iron, per 100 lbs 4 80 

Norway iron 12 00 

Mild steel 6 06 

Band steel 5 05 

Sleigh shoe steel 6 05 

Tire steel 5 26 

Toe calk steel, per 100 lbs 6 95 

Mining tool steel, per lb IT^^-O 19 

Black Diamond tool steel, per lb 18 -0 19 

Spring steel 6 60 

Single reeled machinery steel 6 60 

Iron finish machinery steel 5 10 

Harrow tooth steel 6 20 

Black Diamond cast steel, lb 20-0 21 

Not Much Interest 

In Sheets is Manifest 

Montreal. 

SHEETS AND PLATES.— There is 
nothing of outstanding note to report on 
sheets. Some jobbers have less supply of 
galvanized sheets than for some time, one 
reporting his stock about exhausted. The 
supplies in hand are all that can be looked 
for at the present time and what require- 
ments there are may be filled on the basis 
outlined below: 

BLACK SHEETS— 100 lbs. 

10 gauge % $9 73 

12 gauge 9 25 9 65 

14 gauge 7 75 9 00 

16 gauge 7 85 9 15 

18-20 gauge 8 00 9 25 

22-24 gauge 8 00 9 60 

26 gauge 9 70 9 75 

28 gauge 9 90 

10% oz. (28 English) 10 80 10 75 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

10% oz $10 00 

2« ira 9 66 

26 KB 9 25 



22 and 24 ga S Qt 

20 ga t tS 

18 B« 8 16 

1« «r» < 70 

Some Expect Advance 

In Price Wire Nails 

Montreal. 

WIRE AND NAILS.— The market is 
ruling with a steady but firm undertone 
for wire nails. These are moving out 
well to country points and in view of the 
situation regarding w:re rods it is highly 
probable that revisions upward may be 
made at any time. The prices for the 
moment are without change on a base 
quotation of $5.35 per 100 pounds. Cut 
nai'.s still are $5.60 and smooth steel wire, 
for which the demand is only fai" at pres- 
ent, is unchanged at $6.25 per 100 pounds 

Stoves Very Firm; 

Wares May be Higher 

Montreal. 

STOVES, RANGES, WARES.— There 
is no tendency upon the part of the stove 
makers to book beyond a near date on 
stoves. As a matter of fact the limit of 
one large manufacturer is August 31, on 
present price schedules. In view of the 
outlook for supplies of raw material this 
should enable the stove seller to get his 
supplies forward. The outlook is that 
prices will be up materially and an ad- 
vance of 5 per cent, went into effect with 
one stove maker the past week — this 
bringing prices about to the level of the 
recent advances made by others. Wares 
are steady and firm with the probability 
of advances being made in the near future. 

Good Supply Gasoline; 

This and Oil Hold 

Montreal. 

GASOLINE AND COAL OIL.— There 
is a good supply of gasoline to meet the 
present heavy demand and prices are 
without change. It is expected that the 
market on this will rule steadily. The 
same may be applied to coal oil. Its 
use is restricted very largely at present 
but there is considerable used in oil 
stoves. Prices are as follows. Motor 
gasoline 34c. Coal oil, Electroline and 
Palacine, 22c and Royalite 19c. 

lute Advances Still, 

No Changes For Rope 

Montreal. 

ROPE, TWINES, CORDAGE.— While 
advances have been made for all soft 
fibres for some weeks, these do not seem 
to have reached their limit at all. As 
a consequence packings and twines will 
keep moving higher so long as th's is a 
condition. The position of rope is an un- 
changed one and business is, if anything, 
somewhat better. There is this to note, 
and that is that buying is usually done in 
smaller quantities than usual — a small 
fi mount of stock being sent forward on 
many orders. Supplies are ample and the 
market is steady. Pure Manilla is selling 
on a base pi ice of 39c; British Manilla at 
33c and sisal at 27V^c per pound. 



Old Materials Firm; 

Receipts Continue Fair 

Montreal. 

OLD MATERIALS.— The activity in 
old materials is still satisfactory for many 
of the items in the list. Receipts from 
dealers throughout the country are good 
in some respects, while there is a desire 
on the part of those buying for greater 
quantities. Prices are firm but there are 
are no changes this week, the advances 
made a week ago still holding. The local 
demand for old metals is not very marked 
eut there is a good request from over the 
line on many items represented, particu- 
larly for iron and steel. 

Tea lead O&l^ 

Heavy lead pipe 07^^ 

Yellow brass 15% 14 

Red brass 23% 24 

Light brass 08 

Scran zinc 06 06% 

Heavy copper 24% 24% 

Wrought iron. No. 1, per gr. ton .... 27 00 

No. 1 machinery C3st 38 00 40 00 

Heavy melting steel 22 00 23 00 

Pipe scrap 18 00 20 00 

Stove nlate. per ton 26 00 28 00 

No. 2 busheling 13 00 14 00 

Old rubbers, boots and shoes 08% 08% 

Overshoes, lumbermen's rubbers 

boots 07 .... 

Bicycle tires 04% 05 

Automobile tires 05 05% 

Lead Products Steady 

But Are Unchanged 

Montreal. 

LEAD PRODUCTS.— No changes have 
been made this week in the price of these 
lines and while the market is ruling firm, 
with a strong undertone, there is not a 
great deal of business passing. Zinc is 
firm but inactive and of course solder is 
decidedly firm, with the outlook for tin 
even more uncertain th"- ■'■ '--^^ been for 
some days. 

Lead pipe, lb O 15 

Lead waste pipe, lb 16 

Lead traps and bends Net list 

Lead wool lb 14 

Lead sheets, 2% lb. sq, ft., lb 14 * 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3% lbs. sq. ft., lb 13% 

Lead sheets, 4 to 8 lbs. sq. ft., lb 13 

Cut sheets, %e lb. extra, and cut sheets to size, 
le lb. extra. 

Solder (guaranteed) 56% 65 

Solder, strictly, lb 52% 60 

Solder, commercial, lb 48 55 

Solder, wiping, lb 51% 55 

Solder, wire (8 gauge) — 

40-60 62% 

45-55 68% 

Zinc sheets, casks .... 

Do., broken lots .... 

Tin Outlook Firm; 

Pig Lead is Scarce 

Montreal. 

INGOT METALS.— There is but a 
limited demand for any of the metals at 
this time and while this condition pre- 
vails most of the products are on a firm 
basis and some with a distinctly strong 
undertone. 

COPPER. — There is not a great deal 
of this on spot. Prices are high and it 

looks as thouf^ '■' ' ' ' — "" again. 

From the United States no supplies are 
looked for just now. Local price around 
31c per pound. 

TIN. — Requests for permits have been 
turned down and as a consequence little 
tin is available and prices have firmed 
in London again. Some stock is available 



July 20, 1918 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



51 



here still but the position is firm at $1.35 
per lb. 

SPELTER. — A season such as has now 
been reached is the dull one for this metal 
and there is little doing. It is somewhat 
easier but it is not expected this will re- 
sult in a great decline. Around 10 V^ per 
lb. is quoted. 

LEAD. — Advances were made at vari- 
ous points in the States and supply there 
is reported to be light. The demand is 



active from many sources and ^^'^'^y-s are 
booked for all supply for some time ahead. 

Prices are " ' ' "'ith local 

quotations held at 10% to lie per pound. 

ANTIMONY.— Little interest is evin- 
ced in this metal and price holds still at 
around 15-16c per pound. 

ALUMINUM. — Enough is available 
here to meet requirements and prices hold 
without change at .50c per lb. 



TORONTO MARKETS 



TORONTO, July 18.— Price changes 
have been decidedly numerous dur- 
ing the week and the tendency in 
every instance has been upward. One 
of the most important changes is that 
affecting roofing felt, roofing tar, dry 
and tarred building paper. Eavetrough, 
conductor pipe, ridge roll and valleys are 
all up 10 per cent. Other lines follow- 
ing the upward trend are clothes horses, 
pastry and skirt boards, toilet and fet- 
lock clippers, food choppers, mouse and 
rat traps and single barrel shot guns. 
A very satisfactory volume of business 
is reported. 

Building^ Paper, Roofing 
Felt Register Advance 

Toronto. 



BUILDING PAPER, ROOFING FELT. 
— New prices have been named on dr> 
and tarred building paper during the 
week, the No. 2 dry advancing to 60c 
per roll and the No. 2 tarred sheathing 
going up to 75c. Roofing felt, 16 oz. is up 
20c to $3.50 per 100 pounds. The heavy 
dry and tarred straw sheathing has also 
come under revision, selling at $3.10. 
Red Star Special roofing 2-ply has been 
advanced to $1.20 and the 3-ply to $1.48 
per 100 square feet. 

Coal Tar and Roofing 

Cement Also Higher 



Toronto. 

COAL TAR, ROOFING CEMENT.— 
Coal tar has joined the list of lines going 
up and is now quoted at $6.50 per barrel, 
while the refined sells at $7.75 barrel 
or 40c gallon in 5 and 10-gallon lots. 
Roofing cement or roof coating in barrels 
has gone up 2c to 29c per gallon; 1/2 bar- 
rels to 32c; 5 and 10-gallon lots to 40c; 
2-gallon lots to 51c and 1 gallon to 
69c. 

Tackle Blocks Make 
Advance; Valve Discs Too 

Toronto. 



TACKLE BLOCKS, VALVE DISCS.— 
Revised prices have been set on steel 
tackle blocks. The present range of quo- 
tations is higher than those previously 
ruling as will be noted in looking over 
figures on the single herewith: 3-inch 
are now 70c each; 4-inch 85c; 5-inch, 
90c; 6-inch, $1.10 each; 7-inch, $1.30; 
8-inch, $2.15. 

New quotations are now being made 
on Jenkins valve discs, the sizes Vs to 



2-inch selling at net list for orders of 
100 of a size and less than 100, advance 
on list 20 per cent. 

Mouse, Rat Traps, Egg 

Beaters, Clothes Pins 

Toronto. 

MOUSE AND RAT TRAPS, EGG 
BEATERS, CLOTHES PINS.— A sub 
stantial advance in prices on mouse and 
rat traps has been made, averaging 
about 15 per cent. The Holdfast mouse 
trap is now being quoted at $3.35 per 
gross and the Holdfast rat trap at $1.25 
per dozen. 

Dover egg beaters at the new figure of 
$1.75 per dozen are higher. 

A stiff increase in clothes pins has 
become effective, the loose going up 
about 20c and those in cartons 35c per 
case. Quotations now being made on 
this basis in some quarters are for the 
5-gross, loose, $1.15; 4-gross in cartons, 
$1.15; 6 gross in cartons, $1.60. 

Revised Prices on Squares; 
Truckee Wedges Up 



Toronto. 

SQUARES, WEDGES.— Revised prices 
have been issued on steel squares which 
provide for advances in these lines. The 
present range of quotations follows: No. 
3 polished, $22.80 dozen; No. 3 nickel- 
plated, $28.20; No. 3 blued, $29.10; No. 
12 polished, $17.40; No. 14 polished, 
$20.40. 

Truckee wedges No. 50 are now quoted 
at 14c and the No. 68 at 13c per pound. 
Triumph stroppers at $4.00 each and 
Colgate's shaving powder, cream or 
sticks, at $4.50 dozen represent revised 
figures. 

New Fixed Prices 

on Toilet Clippers 

Toronto. 

TOILET CLIPPERS, NIGHT 

LATCHES. — Quotations issued on toilet 
and fetlock clippers are higher than 
those previously ruling as will be noted 
by quotations given herewith: Toilet 
clippers — Khedive, $1.75 pair; No. 14 x 0, 
$2.75; No. 141 x 1, $2.55; No. Al, $1.00; 
Fetlock, No. 171, $2.00; No. Al, $1.00. 

Night latches have also been changed, 
some of the more familiar numbers be- 
ing quoted: Corbin No. 353, $6.25 dozen; 
No. 356, $30.25; No. R356, $3.00; Miller, 
No. 178C, $9.00 dozen; No. 64, $6.15 
The Miller padlocks No. 105 are quoted 



at $4.35 dozen. These prices are all 
advances. 

Rivet Sets Up; Chains 

Show Firm Tendency 

Toronto. 

RIVET SETS, CHAINS.— In line with 
other items, an advance on Irvington 
rivet sets has become effective, the No. 
now selling at $7.15 dozen; No. 1 and 2 
at $6.25; No. 384 at $5.40; No. 5 and 6 
at $3.85; No. 788 at $3.70. 

The tendency on steel chains is very 
firm, one manufacturer already having 
issued new price list which advances his 
prices about 12% per cent.. The items 
affected include cow ties, dog and 
halter chains, tie out chains and kindred 
lines. Resale prices have not been 
named as yet by the jobbers. 

Other Woodenware Lines 
On Upward Trend 

Toronto. 

WOODENWARE.— Practically all 
lines of woodenware are undergoing re- 
vision these days and new quotations 
being issued provide for advances in 
practi'-ally every case. Clothes horses, 
pastry boards and skirt boards are up 
about 10 per cent, in figures now named 
as follows: 

Clothes horses: Folding 4-foot, $7.45: 
5-foot, $8.90; 6-foot, $9.60 dozen; exten- 
sion, 4-foot, $1^.95; 5-foot, $17.85; 6- 
foot, $19.25 dozen. Pastry boards — No. 
2. $10.00; No. 3, $11.00 dozen. Skirt 
boards, 10 x 54 in., $9.55; 12 x 60 in., 
$10.65; 14 X 60 in., $11.75 dozen. 

Food Choppers Again 

Upward; Shot Guns 

Toronto. 



FOOD CHOPPERS, SHOT GUNS.— 
Once again revised figures have been 
named on food choppers, due it is said 
to the high price of tin. The quotations 
now ruling on the Universal ai-e: No. 0, 
$19.20; No. 1, $23.20; No. 2, $28.40; No. 
3, $38.40 per dozen. 

New Victor shot guns, single barrel, 
are 50c higher at $9.75 each; while the 
No. 1 ejector is quoted at $10.25. 

Saw Handles, Hay Fork 
Pulleys and Other Lines 

Toronto. 

SAW HANDLES, HAY FORK PUL- 
LEYS, ETC. — Cross cut saw handles 
have been undergoing revision and new 
prices set range about 15 per cent, higher 
than those formerly ruling. Hay fork 
pulleys are also advanced and new price 
has been made of $5.25 dozen. Franco 
flash light bulbs, which have been listed 
at 17c, are revised and will now be listed 
at 20c each. A supply of charcoal in 
paper sacks is being received by jobbers 
and is being quoted at $1.80 dozen packs. 

Oils and Gasoline Steady, 

Storage Outfits Up 

Toronto. 

OILS, GASOLINE.— There has been 



52 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



gISl M viul 

July 20, 1918 



no change made in oils or gasoline dur- 
ing the week. The demand for all lines 
continues very heavy and supplies are 
equal to orders, though some difficulty 
in getting prompt transportation is ex- 
perienced. Coal oil at 18c to 21c per 
gallon and gasoline at 33c gallon are 
firmly held. 

Stora2.e tank outfits for coal oil, gaso- 
line and lubricating oils have advanced 
about 10 per' cent, for some makes. This 
is said to be due to high prices and 
scarcity of steel. 

Stoves and Enamelware 

Remain Unchanged 

Toronto. 



STOVES, ENAMELWARE.— There 
have been no new developments in re- 
gard to stoves during the week. Prices 
hold very firm on all lines and some 
difficulty in taking care of the demand 
is experienced as far as summer lines 
are concerned. Enamelware remains 
very firm though unchanged with a very 
fa^'r demand in evidence. 

Steady Tone to Nail 

Market, Some Movement 

Toronto. 

WIRE, NAILS. — Just at present the 
tone of the market is very steady and 
no si<?-n 0^ anv '•hans'e is immediately 
evident. The feeling exists that higher 
prices on wire nails are justified but the 
move unward h'^s not materialized. The 
base on wire nails remains at $5.30 and 
cut nails at $5.65 per 100 pounds. Smooth 
steel wire at the base price of $6.25 is 
unchanged. 

Iron and Steel Bars 

Holding Firm 

Toronto. . 

IRON AND STEEL.— Firm price.« 
hold for iron and steel bars and a very 
fair demand continues to manifest it- 
self. Stocks are eciual to demands and 
the situation generally is quite satisfac- 
tory. Ranges of quotations follow: 

TORONTO— Per 100 lbs. 

Common bar iron $ 5 2.5 

Common bar steel 5 50 

Refined iron 5 65 

Angle base 5 75 

Horseshoe iron 5 50 

Tire steel 5 70 

Mild steel 5 50 

Norway iron 11 00 13 00 

Toe caulk steel 6 25 

Sleigh shoe steel 5 50 

Band steel. No. 10 5 75 

Do., No. 12 6 00 

Spring steel 9 50 1150 

Mining drill steel 19 00 30 00 

Sheet cast steel 42 45 

Tool steel 20 42 

Eavetrough, Conductor 

Pipe Go Up 10% 

Toronfo. 

CORRUGATED SHEETS, EAVE- 
TROUGH. — In line with predictions 
made in HARDWARE AND METAL 
some time ago, prices on eavetrouf.;h, 
conductor pipe, ridge roll and valley 
liave all been pdvanced. New prices are 
on a net list basis which represents a 
10 per cent, increase over previous quo- 



tations. Present figures on eavetrou^h 
will be for 0. G. square head and half 
round— 8 inch, $6.90; 10-inch, $7.70; 12- 
inch, $9.10; 15-inch, $12.50; 18~inch. 
$16.00 per 100 feet. Conductor pipe will 
now be quoted for the 2-inch, $8.00; 3- 
inch, $9.70; 4-inch, $12.«0; 5-inch, $17.50; 
6-inch, $21.30 per 100 feet. The other 
lines are up proportionately. A verv 
fair demand is apparent, indicating a 
fair amount of bui'dino'. 

Corrugated sheets hold firm and un- 
changed at advance recorded a short 
time ago. Quotations are as follows: 

TORONTO— Per 100 Sq. Feet 

Corrugated Sheets — Gal'zed Painted 

No. 28 gauge $ 9 00 $ 7 50 

No. 26 gauge 10 00 8 50 

No. 24 gauge 15 00 11 25 

No. 22 gauge 18 00 14 00 

No 20 gauge 21 00 17 50 

No. 18 gauge 27 00 21 00 

Discount. 7% per cent. 

Good Sales for Sheets; 

Stocks Grow Lighter 

Toronto. 



SHEETS, PLATES.— A very brisK 
demand for sheets is in evidence and 
jobbers intimate th^t supplies are going 
out much more freely than thev CTn 
be renlaced. Stocks are commencing to 
feel the drain of orders in a shortage 
develonin? of sizes ^nd erauges. though 
this is not acute bv anv means veL. 
Shipments from U. S. points are few 
and far between. Quotations are un- 
changed on the following basis. 

BTACK SHEETS— 

10 gauge 

12 gauge 

14 gauge 7 45 

16 gauge 7 50 

18-20 gauge 7 80 

22-24 gauge 7 85 

26 gauge 7 90 

28 giuge 8 00 

3/16-inch nlate 

14-inch boiler plate 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— 

10% oz 

U.S. 28 

U.S. 26 

22 and 24 

18 and 20 

16 

14 

Wrot. Iron Pipe Holds 
At Advance; Tubes Scarce 

Toronto. 



Per 100 lbs 




10 00 


$12 00 


10 10 


10 00 


7 90 


8 40 


8 00 


8 60 


7 55 


8 05 


7 60 


8 19 


7 65 


8 15 


7 75 


8 25 


10 10 


10 25 


.... 


10 00 


9 50 


9 75 


9 20 


9 45 


8 90 


9 15 


8 75 


9 00 


8 60 


8 85 


8 45 


8 70 


8 35 


8 60 



WROUGHT IRON PIPE. B':^ILER 

TUBES.— There has been no further 
change made in wrought iron pipe dur- 
ing: the week, prices holding at advance 
of last week and noted in current mar- 
Vet Quotations. Sunplies are dwindling 
owing to scarcitv of skelo and difficulty 
gettino; anv further shipments throu'>ii. 
Boiler tubes are a very scarce article 
•'nd f^e outlook by no means encoura^^r- 
ing. All shipments that may arrive wiil 
be under Government control. Prices 
are unchanged as follows: 

Boiler Tubes— Cold Drawn Lapwcld 

1 inch $36 00 $ 

1% inch 40 00 

IV2 inch 43 00 36 00 

1% inch 43 00 36 00 

2 inch 50 00 36 00 

2% inch 63 00 38 60 

2% inch 55 00 42 00 

3 inch 64 00 60 00 

3% inch 68 00 

3% inch 77 00 60 00 

4 inch 90 00 76 00 



Uead Products Steady; 

Solder Holds Firm 

Toronto. 

LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTS.— 

Quotations on manufactured lead pro- 
ducts have been firmly maintained dur- 
ing the week. The lead market shows 
a little added strength but this is not 
yet reflected in lines listed below. Sol- 
der holds firm with one price on strictly 
of 68 %c being named. Business is fair 
but not by any means heavy. Prices 
lange as follows: 

Lead pipe, lb. . . 15 .... 

Lead waste pipe, lb 16 .... 

Lead traps and bends Net list 

Lead wool, lb I51/2 16 

Lead sheets, 3 to 3"2 lbs. sq. ft., lb 13^4 

Lead sheets, 4 to 8 lbs. sq. ft 12% 13 

Cut sheets, %c lb. extra, and cut sheets to si^.e. 

Solder, guaranteed, lb 60 

Solder, strictly, lb 55V2 681/2 

Solder, commercial, lb 51 62 

Solder, wiping, lb 55 

Solder, wire, lb 70 80 

Zinc sheets, per lb 26 

Old Materials in 

Unchanged Position 

Toronto. 

OLD MATERIALS.— Old materials 
are in an unchanged position, activity 
seemingly having deserted these lines. 
Prices hold at unchanged levels at fig- 
ures shown herewith. 

Tea lead $0 O514 

Heavy lead pipe 07% 07% 

Yellow brass 12 13 

Red brass 21 

Light brass 09% 

Heavy zinc 05% 06 

Heavy copper 21% 22 

Stove plate, per ton 17 00 18 00 

Old cast iron, per ton 26 00 26 00 

Overshoes, trimmed Arctics 06% 

Auto tires 04% 

Bicycle tires 03% 

Per gross ton. 

No. 1 railroad wrought 26 00 27 00 

No. 2 railroad wrought 15 00 16 00 

Pipes and flues 12 00 

No. 1 busheling 16 00 17 00 

No. 2 busheling 12 00 

Country mixed scrap 16 00 

Quiet Marks Cordage 

Situation; Prices Hold 

Toronto. 

ROPE, TWINE.— Quiet prevails in 
regard to rope and twine, the present 
being an in-between period when book- 
ed orders have largely been taken care 
of and repeat business has not yet start- 
ed. There has been no change made in 
prices on rope, manila selling at 39c 
base per pound; British manila at 33c 
and sisal at 27 %c. 

Wool Waste Goes 

Higher; Oakum Steady 

Toronto. 

WASTE, OAKUM. — An advance in 
prices applying on wool waste has been 
made and quotations now range at 13c, 
18c, 25c or 30c per pound according to 
quality. Wipers is also higher at 10c, 
lie and 13c per pound. The demand is 
fair although mills are operating largely 
on contracts. Oakum remains firm and 
unchanged at prices shown in current 
market Quotations. A fair volume of 
trading is being done. 



July 20, 1918 



Lead, Antimony, Tin 

All Show Strength 



■roronlo. 

INGOT METALS. — Lead, antimony 
and tin show the greatest strength of 
the week in that prices on each have 
stiffened in some quarters. Copper for 
commercial purposes is scarce. Odd 
shipments of tin continue to arrive but 
are quickly absorbed. 

COPPER.— This metal is in very light 
supply and there is little available for 
commercial purposes. The demand cen- 
tres around war work principally. 
Quotations range from 30 to 32c per 
pound. 

TIN. — A little higher price is gener- 
ally noticeable. Tin is available in very 
limited quantities and the few shipments 
getting through are quickly used up. 
Price runs from $1.20 to $1.40 per 
pound on spot offerings. 

SPELTER.— There have been no par- 
ticularly interesting features in connec- 



IIARDWARE AND MLTAf. 

tion with this market. Prices . have 
eenb maintained at lOVz to lie per 
pound locally with the demand small. 

LEAD. — A little higher price has been 
named in some quarters, quotations now 
ranging from WVz to 11 4c per pound. 
There is little moving commercially with 
ample stocks available. 

ALUMINUM.— The same conditions 
prevail in regard to this metal as have 
existed for some months past — in one 
word, uninteresting. Price is held at 
50c per pound 

ANTIMONY.— Another advance has 
been made in some quarters of Ic per 
pound which serves to widen the i-ange 
from 18c to 21c. Trading is a little 
more inclined to be active. 

PIG IRON. — Production though heavy 
continues to be largely absorbed in var- 
ious phases of war work and as far as 
domestic requirements go, there is little 
to be said. Manufacturers cannot secure 
ample supplies and must face a period 
of dwindling stocks. 



LONDON MARKETS 



LONDON, July 18. — Prices continue 
very firm with numerous advances 
ind conditions at present point to 
further advances on many lines. Lin- 
seed oil is up 10c per gallon and new 
quotations have been named on wash- 
boards, nine tar, fibre tuhs, clothss pins, 
and stable brooms., Other items on 
which revised prices have been named 
include anti-rattlers, fence pliers, shoe 
stands and lasts, pipe fittings and soap 
stone crayons. 

Although the holiday season is having 
a quieting effect on trade, business is 
seasonably good. 

Washboards Make Advance 
Clothes Pins Follow Suit 



London. 

WASH BOARDS, CLOTHES PINS.— 

New prices which represent advances 
have been named on wash boards during 
the week. The present scale of quota- 
tions follows: Pony (zinc) $2.25 dozen. 
Improved Globe (zinc) $4.90 dozen. Im- 
•proved Globe (tin) $3.35 dozen. Dia- 
mond King (glass) $6.00 dozen. 

A further advance on clothes pins has 
also been put into effect the round wood 
pin, 5 gross to a box loose, are now sell- 
ing at $1.20 per box. 

Fibre Tubs Reach 

Higher Levels 

London. 



FIBRE TUBS.— After a period of 
steady prices, new fis-ures have been is- 
sued on fibre tubs which are at higher 
levels than those previously ruling. The 
present range of quotations is given out 
as follows: No. 0, $22.35 dozen. No. 1, 
$19.15 dozen. No. 2, $15.95 dozen. No. 
3, $13.60 dozen. 



Pine Tar Higher; White 

Lead, Putty Firm 

London. 

PINE TAR, WHITE LEAD, PUTTY.- 
A new price has been issued on pine 
tar in tins, pints being higher at $1.75 
dozen. 

The market on white lead in oil and 
putty are very firmly held with light 
sales reported. Quotations on pure 
white lead in oil are in ton lots $17.25 
and less than ton lots $17.60 per 100 
pounds. Putty in drums sells at $5.55 
for standard and $7.55 for pure per 100 
pounds. 

Stable Brooms Move Up; 
Binder Tivine Selling 

London. . 

STABLE BROOMS, BINDER TWINE 
— Higher prices are the order of the 
day as applied to stable brooms on which 
new Quotations have been issued along 
the following lines: Set in pitch. No. 
4 X 12 inch, $7.50 dozen; No. 5 xl3 
inch, $8 00 dozen; No. 6 x 14 inch, $9.00 
dozen. Wire drawn. No. 112, $7.50 doz- 
en; No. 113, $8.25 dozen; No. 114, $11.00 
dozen. 

Binder twine is reported in good de- 
mand with prices uncliano-ed, 500 fl. 
selling at 223 Vac lb.; 550 ft. at 25i/4c.; 
600 ft. at 26 1/2 c and 650 ft. at 28c. Hay 
fork rope is still selling here though 
other sizes are somewhat quiet. Prices 
have been firmly held on the following 
basis: Pure manila 39c per pound. Brit- 
ish manila 33c per pound. New Zea- 
land hemp 33c per pound. Sisal 27 %c 
per pound. 

Higher Prices Named 

On Pipe Fittings 

London. 

PIPE FITTINGS. — Higher prices 



53 



have been named on pipe fittings, the 
following prices now being in effect: 
Black malleable fittings. Class A., 60c 
lb.; B, 27c lb.; C, 19c lb. Galvanized 
malleable fittings. Class A., 75c lb.; B., 
37c lb.; C, 27c lb. Unions, 30 per cent. 
bushings 15 per cent, discount; plugs, 
121/^ per cent, discount; nipples, 4 inch 
and under, 45 per cent, discount. 

Fence Pliers Up; Nails 

Selling Very Well 

London. 

PLIERS, NAILS. — Quotations now 
ruling on Red Devil fence pliers have 
reached higher levels than those former- 
ly ruling. Prices now being asked are: 
No. 1000 X 8 inch $10.00 dozen. No. 
1000 X 10 inch $12.00 dozen. 

The sale of nails has been good dur- 
ing the past month and is still fair. 
Price has held very firm, and no change 
is reported. The followinir is basis of quo- 
tations: Wire, $5.30 base per 100 pounds; 
cut, $5.60 

Stands and Lasts Up; 

Soapstone Crayons Also 

London. 

STANDS AND LASTS, CRAYONS, 

ANTI-RATTLERS. — Many miscellan- 
eous items in the hardwareman's stock 
have undergone revision during the week, 
among the lines affected being iron shoe 
stands and lasts which are adjusted on 
the following basis of selling: Studs, 12 
inch, $1.85 dozen; lasts. No. 1, 65c doz- 
en; No. 2, 75c dozen; No. 3, $1.25 dozen; 
No. 4, $1.50 dozen. 

Soapstone crayons have also under- 
gone a change, a higher price being es- 
tablished of $3.50 per gross. 

Quick shift anti-rattlers are now quot- 
ed at $3.25 per dozen pairs for % inch 
and 5-16 inch. This is an advance. 

Mixed Paints Move 

Up to Higher Levels 

London. ■ — ^ 

LINSEED PAINT.— New prices have 
been named on linseed prepared paints 
which provide for advances in this line. 
The high cost of oil and recent advan-^ 
in white lead are factors in the new 
quotations now prevailing as follows: 
5 gal. cans, $3.45 gal.; 1 gal. cans, $3.55 
gal.; 1/2 gal. cans, $3.65 gal.; % gal. 
cans, $3.75 gal.; pints, $3.95 gal.; 1/2 
pints, $4.35 gal.; white add. 10c gal.; 
flat white add. 45c gal.; special greens 
add. 40c gal.; special reds add. 65c gal. 

Linseed Oil Advances 

IOC Gal.; Turps Firm 

London. 

LINSEED OIL, TURPENTINE.— The 

position of linseed oil is reflected in an 
advance of 10c per gallon and the im- 
mediate future holds little promise of 
easier prices. The seed market fluc- 
tuates considerably but is generally on 
a higher level and with the visible sup- 
plies light, the tendency can be easily 
determined. New